Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'design'

Steph Wilson

Meet the newest member of the design team, UX designer Raul Alvarez, who will be working on the Ubuntu convergence story. Raul will be bringing new ideas to improve our apps to allow for a seamless experience across all devices. We caught up with him to tell us more about his background and what attracted him to the open source world of Ubuntu.

raul

 

You can find Raul’s blog here and reach out to him on Twitter using his handle @raulalgo.

Tell me about your background

If we go all the way back to university, I started as a computer engineer student, but after a while I got to a point where I was rather burnt out by it. Then almost by chance, I ended up studying another degree in Advertising and PR. When studying my second degree I gained a fresh perspective. I was coming from studying maths and physics to then finding myself in classes for Spanish, history, law, and eventually design, which is where I got hooked.

I turned 30 and decided to move to London, as everyone in the small town of Salamanca (West Spain) was either getting married or bored; I was the latter. I wanted to challenge myself to do the most difficult things and push a bit more. I moved into designing Forex trading apps, which was a great experience with very smart people. I got to work very close with the developers too.

I then went into e-commerce as a designer, which was another diverse industry I wanted to learn from. Getting into something I know nothing about is key for me. It’s tricky, as people want experience, but once I’m there and I learn, I feel that I have the ability to take a fresh look at things. From studying advertising and knowing how apps are build I could bring those disciplines together to work on different platforms.

Canonical was a company I wanted to be part of. Just so happens they were looking for a designer, and now here I am!

Do you have any projects you’re working / or have worked on?

In the late days of my computer engineering degree, me and some fellow students started our own business. It was when the Social Network movie was out and everyone wanted to be Mark Zuckerberg; and so did we. We created a photography social network that was like a Flickr wannabe, or closer to what 500px is now. We had good intentions and we worked very hard on it. However, we lacked the business vision and strategy to push it forward. We had two choices: we close it off and do something else, or we find a better way to make money.

Salamanca is a small town and has little going on, but it just so happened that a company was doing mobile apps on demand for clients. Instead of hiring more people when they had large spikes of work, they would reached out to other companies. My three partners were playing the role of developers and I was the designer. We spent four years designing mobile apps for various clients specific needs, most came from the advertising industry. We had some startups come to us who didn’t have much money and we would help them advertise and prototype their apps. It was always a rather constrained working environment with a low budget and working with trial and error.

What attracted you to the open source world of Ubuntu?

For me, being here is amazing because I had been using a laptop that ran Ubuntu in my uni days. I’ve always known open source and the ideas around it. I remember playing with Linux when I was at high school too.

What does UX mean to you?

User Experience (laughs). But seriously, I think the term ‘UX’ is thrown back and forth a lot and people forget what it means. It’s a lot of ideas that could or could not be UX.

People might think that UX is just associated with apps and web design. But it’s not. If you think about user experience, it’s in everything. You can use user experience to build your hotel for instance. I could say how is the lobby going to be decorated, what is the uniform going to be like, do I want the guests to find a little chocolate under their pillow? THAT is defining the user experience. You don’t need to do a lot of research. Well, you can research user experience in other hotels, that would be one approach. Or you can say I have this vision I want to make my approach work. For this you need good judgement and to think about people, but also be prepared to take risks.

One of the parts I enjoy most about designing is whenever I don’t know what I’m going to do. That is the fun bit.

What have you learned in your first week at Canonical?

I came here thinking I knew how complex an operating system was. I wasn’t even close. I realised the complexity was way down below, every single little thing is taken into account, which amazes me. Then I realised the scale of the task. It’s amazing how much work is going on here. I have a lot of respect for it.

What is your proudest achievement?

Making a decision like: I’m stuck and I need a change. I made the effort to move to a different country and to change my degree. It has always been very natural for me to take risks, but I didn’t realize how scary it actually is until I stop and think about it.

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Femma

Last week the design team had two interns undertaking their work experience at the London office.

Our first student is studying computer science for her GCSEs and has an interest in Python programming and software engineering. The second student is studying Geography and IT and had a general interest in IT.

The tasks

We wanted them to experience what working in the design team is like, so we set them two tasks:

Task 1 – Create a poster of your work experience

We asked them to keep a note of the key things that they had been doing and what they learned throughout the week.

They were then asked to create two paper versions of their posters, which were reviewed by one of our visual designers. After being reviewed, the designers helped the student to create a final electronic version, which they could take back to school with them.

Task 2 – Convergence tablet

We asked them to use the convergence tablet as their device during the week for user testing purposes.

We wanted them to:

  • Send emails
  • Take notes
  • Update social media
  • Take images
  • Organise their gallery
  • Share something with a friend
  • Play games
  • Play music
  • Read news articles or other articles

We asked for feedback on:

  • What they liked about convergence
  • What would they like to see on the tablet?
  • What was their favourite app
  • What can we improve?

They were expected to talk through their feedback for 15 minutes with two designers.

Feedback

By the end of the week we wanted our interns to have the confidence to present their findings to us, as well as experience a review process with their poster designs.

The feedback we got from our first student – who used the tablet for 4 days, in between her other tasks – said: ‘ready, not a prototype, sleek and lightweight’. What she liked most about it was that ‘it can be a whole computer if you connect it’. She also liked the UbuntuStore.

The feedback we got back from our second student – who used the tablet in between tasks of making bootable USB drives and learning code – was that he ‘likes how it has the capability to … just pick it up and plug it into a monitor … Because it means that you don’t have to carry anything around, just a tablet.’
His favourite app was the Browser, he said ‘because it gives you access to everything’ and he thought it was ‘better than Safari because Safari blocks a lot of things like Flash’. He thought that the camera was of ‘good quality and focused quickly’ and felt it was easy to take photos and videos.

We also received suggestions on what they wished to see in the future and what they thought could be improved, which was great to see from the student demographic. We have captured all of this and can incorporate some of these ideas.

Work experience poster

With the help of one of our visual designer’s, we reviewed our first student’s paper designs and helped bring her poster to life.

work-experience-poster

This poster was the fruits of her labour and she was then tasked with finishing it off at home, ready to take back to school with her.

Our London office really values the work our work experience interns undertake in the week they are here during the summer. Many of them tend to have interests in technology and our open source nature is a good way to give them a flavour of the Ubuntu design and engineering process.

Want to be an intern at Canonical?

If you’re a student and like what you’ve seen so far, and would like to undertake your work experience with us please do get in touch with Stefanie Davenoy – stefanie.davenoy@canonical.com.

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Steph Wilson

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You can now follow us on Dribbble and Behance for design inspiration.

See things like: the Ubuntu #reinvent digital campaign, Juju embeddable card and Suru app icon designs.

Follow us :)

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Inayaili de León Persson

Getting Vanilla ready for v1: the roadmap

We have been using our front end framework Vanilla across our sites for a while now, so it might surprise you to know that its first official version (let’s call it v1) hasn’t yet been released.

In preparation for v1 (which we are tentatively aiming for early September), there are a few tasks that we have been, and will be, working on to make sure that Vanilla is as robust as we can make it, and to make the process of using and improving it clear.

Future-thinking: defining a high level roadmap

It’s important that long-term, ongoing projects have defined goals that people can focus on and strive for. Having short, mid and long-term goals makes it easier to prioritise and concentrate efforts on tasks that will get you closer to achieving the ultimate vision for the project.

The first thing we did in order to outline a roadmap for Vanilla was to collect all the things that we felt needed to happen for it to be ready for release, things we’d like to improve, and wishlist items that might not be urgent but that we would like to tackle at some point in the future.

With this list at hand, we organised the tasks by priority and added them to a roadmap board in Trello, which is open for anyone to have a look at. You can see which tasks we are working on during the current two-week sprint, and which tasks are queued to be done next.

 

Vanilla roadmap in TrelloThe Vanilla framework roadmap Trello board

 

Contributing: defining the process for adding new patterns

Releasing Vanilla v1 does not mean that Vanilla will then be finished. As a working style guide that is used across Canonical on various different projects with different needs, new patterns will emerge and existing ones will have to be improved to be more flexible.

We thought that it would be good to document the process that a pattern should follow in order to become a Vanilla pattern, so after a little bit of brainstorming, we created a diagram that shows the different steps that should be taken from before submitting a pattern proposal to its full acceptance as a Vanilla pattern.

Most of the steps in the diagram happen in just a few seconds, but it is good to be able to visualise the entire process.

 

Vanilla process diagramDiagram of the process to submit a new pattern to Vanilla

 

As Vanilla itself, this process diagram is not really finished. Once we start using it more frequently, we will probably have to make some adjustments to improve it. Also, there are a few branches of the process that we still need to include, namely how a pattern is added to a theme as opposed to the main Vanilla framework, and how an existing pattern (in a website of Vanilla theme) can be promoted to Vanilla.

As part of this task, we also updated the existing GitHub template that pops up when you submit a new issue on the Vanilla repository to include the option of submitting a pattern proposal.

The proposals will be reviewed on a fortnightly basis by the web team during the Vanilla working group meetings. We are pondering how we can make these meetings open to anyone who’d like to participate, as we know that lots of you would like to contribute with new patterns and improvements. We’d be happy to hear your ideas on how this could work.

Defining browser support guidelines

While internally, in the web team, we tend to agree on and follow consistent browser support guidelines, the process isn’t documented.

We want to make sure that Vanilla is built following the latest web standards, and that people can build sites with it that will work on as many form factors as possible, so we thought defining the browser support guidelines that we want contributors to follow was a vital step in preparation for the v1 release.

The document isn’t yet finished, but we are working on it as we speak and will be sharing it soon enough.

Future tasks

You can see the roadmap that we have planned for Vanilla in preparation for v1 and after in Trello, but there are few key tasks that we want to carry out before September that we’d like to highlight:

  • Defining the accessibility standards that all patterns will have to follow, and adding automated tests to the build process to ensure they are adhered to
  • Conducting an internal accessibility audit and making as many changes as we can to improve accessibility
  • Redesigning the dedicated Vanilla website to include the new documentation we are writing and other pieces of useful information, including the style guide itself — all living together in one single site
  • And, obviously, making sure that Vanilla has its own logo — as any respectable framework does :)

Final words

This is all from me for now! Barry is writing a companion post that will go into more detail about the technical tasks that are being done on Vanilla, which he will be publishing soon.

We would love to know if you have any ideas on how to improve Vanilla — share your thoughts in the comments.

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Grazina Borosko

Every year since 2001, creatives from different design disciplines meet and share their ideas and innovations about digital, interaction and print design in the design festival called OFFF.

This festival was previously held in different countries, but has now found its home in Barcelona at the Design Museum. For three days the festival was jam-packed full of inspirational ideas and speakers such as Paula Scher, Tony Brook, Joshua Davis and many more.

 

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OFFF  space in the Design Musem

OFFF

OFFF 2016 book and program

What is the festival about?

The festival gives a great overview of design trends, work processes and implementation practices, as well as generating ideas and inspiration from around the world. A festival organizer claimed that: “it is more than just a Festival hosting innovative and international speakers, it is more than a meeting point for all talents around the world to collaborate, it is more than feeding the future. OFFF is a community inviting all those who are eager to learn to participate and get inspired by a three-day journey of conferences, workshops, activities, and performances.”

 

Ustwo

Ustwo

Hey studio

Hey studio

A word of advice…

Before coming to the festival make sure you have a list of speakers you would like to hear, because there are 50 different talks taking place covering a wide scope of topics. It was interesting to hear designers sharing their experiences in design, such as self-initiated projects, dealing with clients, social life versus private, time management and working in a team and solo difficulties.

 

Nonformat

Non-Format

Joshua Davis deisgn

Joshua Davis design

Why you should go to the festival

Being surrounded by creative people for a three days helps you look at your work from the different perspectives. It is always healthy to leave your comfort zone and talk to other creators to see what kind of issues other people have, and how they are solving them. There’s no wrong or right way in the creative process. There are different ways which might work for you, and some that don’t. Inspiring talks give you energy and make you believe that anything is possible to achieve; you just need to do it!

 

Mark Adamson

Danny Sangra

 

 

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Paty Davila

Last week I was invited to Beijing to take part in the China Launch Sprint. The focus of the sprint was to identify action items in our product roadmap for the next devices that will ship Ubuntu Touch in the Chinese market later this year.

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I am a lead UX designer in the product strategy team currently doing many exciting things, such as designing the convergence experience across the Ubuntu platform. I was invited to offer design support and participate in the planning of the work we will be doing with our industry partner, China Mobile, after reviewing the CTA test results.

What is CTA?

CTA stands for China type approval which is a certificate granted to a product that meets a set of regulatory, technical and safety requirements. Generally, type approval is required before a product is allowed to be sold in a particular country.

Topics covered:

  • CTA Level 1-4 test cases and developed a new testing tool for pre-install applications.
    We reviewed the content and proposed design for all five of Migu scopes with design team’s input.
  • Also, we discussed the new RCS (Rich Communication Suite) integration with our Messaging app and prepared demos [link] for MWC Shanghai, Asia’s biggest mobile event happening at the end of this month.
  • And explored ideas around the design of mCloud service integration with our storage framework.

Achievements

The sprint was very productive and a great experience to sync up with old and new faces. We were all excited to explore ideas and work together on the next steps for China Mobile and Ubuntu.

Downtown in Beijing

I had some downtime to explore the city and have a taste of Beijing’s most interesting local dishes and potions with people I met from the sprint…

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Michi has creatively named this one as snake juice.

Team dinner :)

A large team dinner.

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The famous Great Wall of China.

The city lights of Beijing :)

The city lights of Beijing :)

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Luca Paulina

Juju GUI 2.0

Juju is a cloud orchestration tool which enables users to build models to run applications. You can just as easily use it to deploy a simple WordPress blog or a complex big data platform. Juju is a command line tool but also has a graphical user interface (GUI) where users can choose services from a store, assemble them visually in the GUI, build relations and configure them with the service inspector.

Juju GUI allows users to

  • Add charms and bundles from the charm store
  • Configure services
  • Deploy applications to a cloud of their choice
  • Manage charm settings
  • Monitor model health

Over the last year we’ve been working on a redesign of the Juju GUI. This redesign project focused on improving four key areas, which also acted as our guiding design principles.

1. Improve the functionality of the core features of the GUI

  • Organised similar areas of the core navigation to create a better UI model.
  • Reduced the visual noise of the canvas and the inspector to help users navigate complex models.
  • Introduced a better flow between the store and the canvas to aid adding services without losing context.
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Empty state of the canvas

 

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Integrated store

 

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Apache charm details

 

2. Reduce cognitive load and pace the user

  • Reduced the amount of interaction patterns to minimise the amount of visual translation.
  • Added animation to core features to inform users of the navigation model in an effort to build a stronger concept of home.
  • Created a symbiotic relationship between the canvas and the inspector to help navigation of complex models.
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Mediawiki deployment

 

3. Provide an at-a-glance understanding of model health

  • Prioritised the hierarchy of status so users are always aware of the most pressing issues and can discern which part of the application is effected.
  • Easier navigation to units with a negative status to aid the user in triaging issues.
  • Used the same visual patterns throughout the web app so users can spot problematic issues.
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Mediawiki deployment with errors

 

4. Surface functions and facilitate task-driven navigation

  • Established a new hierarchy based on key tasks to create a more familiar navigation model.
  • Redesigned the inspector from the ground up to increase discoverability of inspector led functions.
  • Simplified the visual language and interaction patterns to help users navigate at-a-glance and with speed to triage errors, configure or scale out.
  • Surfaced relevant actions at the right time to avoid cluttering the UI.
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Inspector home view

 

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Inspector errors view

 

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Inspector config view

 

The project has been amazing, we’re really happy to see that it’s launched and are already planning the next updates.



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Luca Paulina

Design in the open

As the Juju design team grew it was important to review our working process and to see if we could improve it to create a more agile working environment. The majority of employees at Canonical work distributed around the globe, for instance the Juju UI engineering team has employees from Tasmania to San Francisco. We also work on a product which is extremely technical and feedback is crucial to our velocity.

We identified the following aspects of our process which we wanted to improve:

  • We used different digital locations for storing their design outcomes and assets (Google Drive, Google Sites and Dropbox).
  • The entire company used Google Drive so it was ideal for access, but its lacklustre performance, complex sharing options and poor image viewer meant it wasn’t good for designs.
  • We used Dropbox to store iterations and final designs but it was hard to maintain developer access for sharing and reference.
  • Conversations and feedback on designs in the design team and with developers happened in email or over IRC, which often didn’t include all interested parties.
  • We would often get feedback from teams after sign-off, which would cause delays.
  • Decisions weren’t documented so it was difficult to remember why a change had been made.

Finding the right tool

I’ve always been interested in the concept of designing in the open. Benefits of the practice include being more transparent, faster and more efficient. They also give the design team more presence and visibility across the organisation. Kasia (Juju’s project manager) and I went back and forth on which products to use and eventually settled on GitHub (GH).

The Juju design team works in two week iterations and at the beginning of a new iteration we decided to set up a GH repo and trial the new process. We outlined the following rules to help us start:

  • Issues should be created for each project.
  • All designs/ideas/wireframes should be added inline to the issues.
  • All conversations should be held within GH, no more email or IRC conversations, and notes from any meetings should be added to relevant issues to create a paper trail.

Reaction

As the iteration went on, feedback started rolling in from the engineering team without us requesting it. A few developers mentioned how cool it was to see how the design process unfolded. We also saw a lot of improvement in the Juju design team: it allowed us to collaborate more easily and it was much easier to keep track of what was happening.

At the end of the trial iteration, during our clinic day, we closed completed issues and uploaded the final assets to the “code” section of the repo, creating a single place for our files.

After the first successful iteration we decided to carry this on as a permanent part of our process. The full range of benefits of moving to GH are:

  • Most employees of Canonical have a GH account and can see our work and provide feedback without needing to adopt a new tool.
  • Project management and key stakeholders are able to see what we’re doing, how we collaborate, why a decision has been made and the history of a project.
  • Provides us with a single source for all conversations which can happen around the latest iteration of a project.
  • One place where anyone can view and download the latest designs.
  • A single place for people to request work.

Conclusion

As a result of this change our designs are more accessible which allows developers and stakeholders to comment and collaborate with the design team aiding in our agile process. Below is an example thread where you can see how GH is used in the process. I shows how we designed the new contextual service block actions.

GH_conversation_new_navigation

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Steph Wilson

Meet the newest member of the Design Team, project manager Davide Casa. He will be working with the Platform Team to keep us all in check and working towards our goals. I sat down with him to discuss his background, what he thinks makes a good project manager and what his first week was like at Canonical (spoiler alert – he survived it).

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You can read Davide’s blog here, and reach out to him on Github and Twitter with @davidedc.

Tell us a bit about your background?

My background is in Computer Science (I did a 5 year degree). I also studied for an MBA in London.

Computer science is a passion of mine. I like to keep up to date with latest trends and play with programming languages. However, I never got paid for it, so it’s more like a hobby now to scratch an artistic itch. I often get asked in interviews: “why aren’t you a coder then?” The simple answer is that it just didn’t happen. I got my first job as a business analyst, which then developed into project management.

What do you think makes a good project manager?

I think the soft skills are incredibly relevant and crucial to the role. For example: gathering what the team’s previous experience of project management was, and what they expect from you, and how deeply and quickly you can change things.

Is project management perceived as a service or is there a practise of ‘thought leadership’?

In tech companies it varies. I’ve worked in Vodafone as a PM and you felt there was a possibility to practice a “thought leadership”, because it is such a huge company and things have to be dealt with in large cycles. Components and designs have to be agreed on in batches, because you can’t hand-wave your way through 100s of changes across a dozen mission-critical modules, it would be too risky. In some other companies less so. We’ll see how it works here.

Apart from calendars, Kanban boards and post-it notes  – what else can be used to help teams collaborate smoothly?

Indeed one of the core values of Agile is “the team”. I think people underestimate the importance of cohesiveness in a team, e.g. how easy it is for people to step forward and make mistakes without fear. A cohesive team is something that is very precious and I think that’s a regularly underestimated. You can easily buy tools and licenses, which are “easy solutions” in a way. The PM should also help to improve the cohesiveness of a team, for example creating processes that people can rely on in order to avoid attrition, and resolve things. Also to avoid treating everything like a special case to help deal with things “proportionally”.

What brings you to the Open Source world?

I like coding, and to be good coder, one must read good code. With open source the first thing you do is look around to see what others are doing and then you start to tinker with it. It has almost never been relevant for me to release software without source.

Have you got any side projects you’re currently working on?

I dabble in livecoding, which is an exotic niche of people that do live visuals and sounds with code (see our post on Qtday 2016). I am also part of the Toplap collective which works a lot on those lines too.

I also dabble in creating an exotic desktop system that runs on the web. It’s inspired by the Squeak environment, where everything is an object and is modifiable and inspectable directly within the live system. Everything is draggable, droppable and composable. For example, for a menu pops up you can change any button, both the labelling or the function it performs, or take apart any button and put it anywhere else on the desktop or in any open window. It all happens via “direct manipulation”. Imagine a paint application where at any time while working you can “open” any button from the toolbar and change what the actual painting operation does (John Maeda made such a paint app actually).

The very first desktop systems all worked that way. There was no concept of a big app or “compile and run again”. Something like a text editor app would just be a text box providing functions. The functions are then embodied in buttons and stuck around the textbox, and voila, then you have your very own flavour of text editor brought to life. Also in these live systems most operations are orthogonal: you can assume you can rotate images, right? Hence by the same token you can rotate anything on the screen. A whole window for example, or text. Two rotating lines and a few labels become a clock. The user can combine simple widgets together to make their own apps on the fly!

What was the most interesting thing you’ve learned in your first week here?

I learned a lot and I suspect that will never stop. The bread and butter here is strategy and design, which in other companies is only just a small area of work. Here it is the core of everything! So it’ll be interesting to see how this ‘strategy’ works. And how the big thinking starts with the visuals or UX in mind, and from that how it steers the whole platform. An exciting example of this can be seen in the Ubuntu Convergence story.

That’s the essence of open source I guess…

Indeed. And the fact that anti-features such as DRM, banners, bloatware, compulsory registrations and basic compilers that need 4GB of installation never live long in it. It’s our desktop after all, is it not?

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Steph Wilson

The Ubuntu App Design Clinic is back! This month members of the Design Team James Mulholland (UX Designer), Jouni Helminen (Visual Designer) and Andrea Bernabei (UX Engineer) sat down with Dan Wood, contributor to the OwnCloud app.

What is OwnCloud?

OwnCloud is an open source project, self-hosted file sync and share app platform. Access & sync your files, contacts, calendars & bookmarks across your devices.

You can contribute to it here.

We covered:

  • First case usage – the first point of entry for the user, maybe a file manager or a possible tooltip introduction.
  • Convergent thinking – how the app looks across different surfaces.
  • Top-level navigation – using the header to display actions, such as settings.
  • Using Online Accounts to sync other accounts to the cloud.
  • Using sync frequency or instant syncing.

If you missed it, or want to watch it again, here it is:

The next App Design Clinic is yet to be confirmed. Stay tuned.

 

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James Mulholland

We’re very happy to announce the return of the Ubuntu App Design Clinics.

The first session is planned for 4.00PM BST on Friday the 17th of June, with subsequent sessions occurring at 4.00PM BST on Thursdays.

We’ll be on camera talking to Dan Wood regarding his work on the OwnCloud App. Feel free to drop in and join the discussion via IRC:
http://ubuntuonair.com/

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For more information regarding Dan Wood and his work, be sure to stop by his Google Plus. You can also stop by Dan’s Owncloud Telegram Group anytime and talk about the application with its creator.

We look forward to seeing you there!

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Grazina Borosko

Last year we were working on OOBE redesign with the aim to improve first user experience with Ubuntu phone. Now the Design Team is working on the second part of this project which we call Edge Education.

The purpose of Edge Education is to aid discoverability and to educate users into using them naturally. For example, did you know what you can access the whole system by swiping from the edges of the screen.

How many edges Ubuntu phone has?

At the moment, the Ubuntu phone has four edges that can be interacted with in six ways.

Left short swipe

If you short swipe across the left edge you will open the launcher.

Left long swipe

You can quickly come back from any app to the Dash by a long left swipe.

Top swipe

Swiping from the top edge will give you access to indicator menus.

Right long swipe

Long swipe from the right edge will open the switcher to let you move between open apps.

Right short swipe

Swiping from the right edge you will switch between your current and previous app (ALT-TAB interaction).

Bottom swipe (app specific)

Swiping from the bottom edge brings you different functionality depending if you are in app or scope. Not all apps has a bottom edge. If an app has a bottom edge you will know this by seeing a bottom edge hint. For example, you can add a new contact by swiping from the bottom edge in the Contacts app. By doing bottom edge swipe in the scopes you can quickly favourite and unfavorite your scopes.

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Carla Berkers

OpenStack is the leading open cloud platform, and Ubuntu is the world’s most popular operating system for OpenStack. Over the past two years we have created a tool that allows users to build an Ubuntu OpenStack cloud on their own hardware in a few simple steps: Autopilot.

This post covers the design process we followed on our journey from alpha to beta to release.

Alpha release: getting the basics right

We started by mapping out a basic Autopilot journey based on stakeholder requirements and designed a first cut of all the necessary steps to build a cloud:

  1. Choose the cloud configuration from a range of OpenStack optionsChoose cloud configuration
  1. Select the hardware the cloud should be built on
    Select the hardware
  1. View deployment status while the cloud is being built
    View deployment status
  1. Monitor the status and usage of the cloud
    Monitor Cloud

After the initial design phase Autopilot was developed and released as an alpha and a beta. This means that for over a year, there was a product to play around with, test and improve before it was made generally available.

Beta release: feedback and improvements

Providing a better overview: increased clarity in the dashboard

Almost immediately after the engineering team started building our new designs, we discovered that we needed to display an additional set of data on the storage graphs. On top of that, some guerilla testing sessions with Canonical engineers brought to light that the CPU and the storage graphs were easily misinterpreted.

dashboard-sketches

After some more competitive research and exploratory sketching, we decided to merge the graphs for each section by putting the utilisation on a vertical axis and the time on the horizontal axis. This seemed to improve the experience for our engineers, but we also wanted to validate with users in usability testing, so we tested the designs with eight participants that were potential Autopilot users. From this testing we learned to include more information on the axes and to include detailed information on hover.

The current graphs are quite an evolution compared to what we started with:
Improved dashboard graphs

Setting users up for success: information and help before the process begins

Before a user gets to the Autopilot wizard, they have to configure their hardware, install an application called MAAS to register machines and install Landscape to get access to Autopilot. A third tool called Juju is installed to help Autopilot behind the scenes.

All these bits of software work together to allow users to build their clouds; however, they are all developed as stand-alone products by different teams. This means that during the initial design phase, it was a challenge to map out the entire journey and get a good idea of how the different components work together.

Only when the Autopilot beta was released, was it finally possible for us to find some hardware and go through the entire journey ourselves, step by step. This really helped us to identify common roadblocks and points in the journey where more documentation or in-app explanation was required.

Increasing transparency of the process: helping users anticipate what they need and when configuration is complete

Following our walk-through, we identified a number of points in the Autopilot journey where contextual help was required. In collaboration with the engineering team we gathered definitions of technical concepts, technical requirement, and system restrictions.

Autopilot walk-through

Based on this info, we made adjustments to the UI. We designed a landing page  with a checklist and introduction copy, and we added headings, help text, and tooltips to the installation and dashboard page. We also included a summary panel on the configuration page, to guide users through the journey and provide instant feedback.

BR_step-by-step

GA release: getting Autopilot ready for the general public

Perhaps the most rewarding type of feedback we gathered from the beta release — our early customers liked Autopilot but wanted more features. From the first designs Autopilot has aimed to help users quickly set up a test cloud. But to use Autopilot to build a production cloud, additional features were required.

Testing without the hardware: try Autopilot on VMware

One of the biggest improvements for GA release was making it easy to try Autopilot, even for people that don’t have enough spare hardware to build a cloud. Our solution: try Autopilot using VMware!

Supporting customisation:  user-defined roles for selected hardware

In the alpha version a user could already select nodes, but in most enterprises users want more flexibility. Often there are different types of hardware for different roles in the cloud, so users don’t always want to automatically distribute all the OpenStack services over all the machines. We designed the ability to choose specific roles like storage or compute for machines, to allow users to make the most of their hardware.

Machine roles

Allowing users more control: a scalable cloud on monitored hardware

The first feature we added was the ability to add hardware to the cloud. This makes it possible to grow a small test cloud into a production sized solution. We also added the ability to integrate the cloud with Nagios, a common monitoring tool. This means if something happens on any of the cloud hardware, users would receive a notification through their existing monitoring system.

BR-Nagios

The benefits of early release

This month we are celebrating another  release of OpenStack Autopilot. In the two years since we started designing Autopilot, we have been able to add many improvements and it has been a great experience for us as designers to contribute to a maturing product.

We will continue to iterate and refine the features that are launched and we’re currently mapping the roadmap for the months ahead. Our goal remains for Autopilot to be a tool for users to maintain and upgrade an enterprise grade cloud that can be at the core of their operations.

 

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Rae Shambrook

Colour palette updates

Over the past few months, we’ve given you a peek into our evolving Suru design language with our wallpaper, convergence and Clock App blog posts.

Suru is based on Japanese aesthetics: minimalism, lightness and fluidity. This is why you will see the platform moving to a cleaner and more modern look.

Naturally, part of this evolution is colour. The new palette features a lightened set of colours with clearly defined usage to create  better visual hierarchy and an improved aesthetic sense of visual harmony.

On the technical side, SDK colour handling has been improved so that in the future colour usage will be more consistent and less prone to bugs.

The new palette has also expanded in scope with more colours to enable the creation of designs with greater depth, particularly as we move towards convergence, and reflects the design values we wish to impart onto the platform.

colour_palette

The new palette

Like our SDK, the colour palette has to be scalable. As we worked on visual designs for both apps and the shell, we found that having a colour palette which only contained six colours was too limiting. When approaching elements like the indicators or even shadows in the task switcher, light grey and dark grey weren’t going to be deep enough to stand out on a windowed view, where you have wallpaper and other windows to compete with.

The new palette is made up of thirteen colours. Some noticeable differences are an overall lighter look and additional greys. Purple is gone and we’ve added a yellow to the palette. This broader palette works to solve bugs where contrast and visibility were an issue, especially with the dark theme.

How we came to choose the colours was by iteratively reworking the visual designs across the whole platform and discovering what was needed as we designed. The greys came about when we worked on the revamped dark theme and shell projects, for example the upcoming contextual menus. While we added several new greys, the UI itself has taken on a less grey look.

App backgrounds have been upped to white, the grey neutral button has been lightened to Porcelain (a very light grey) in order to keep the button from looking disabled. These changes were made to improve visibility and contrast, to lighten the palette across the board and to keep everything consistent.

 

nearby_scopes
The previous design of the Nearby scope (left) and the updated design using the new palette (right) The background is lighter, buttons don’t look as disabled and text is higher contrast against the background.

 

The new palette allows developers to have more flexibility as the theme is now dynamic, rather than the colours being hard-coded to the UI as they were previously. In fact, our palette theme is built upon a layering system for which you can find the tutorial here.

Changing the use of orange

Previously orange was liberally used throughout our SDK, however such wide-ranging use of orange caused a number of UX issues:

  • Orange is so close to red that, at a glance, components could be misconstrued to be in an error state when in fact their current state was nominal.
  • Because orange is so close to red, the frequent use of orange made it harder for users to pick out actual error states in the UI.
  • Orange attracts the eye to wherever it is used, but frequently these elements didn’t warrant such a high level of visibility.

Around the same time as these issues were identified, we were also working on the design of focus states for keyboard navigation.

A focus state needs to be instantly visible so that a user can effortlessly see which item is focused without having to pause, look harder, and think.

After exploring a wide range of different concepts, we settled on using an orange frame as our keyboard navigation focus state.  However the use of this frame only worked if orange in all other areas was significantly toned down.

In order to fix the UX issues with the overuse of orange and to enable the use of an orange frame as our keyboard navigation focus state, the decision was made to be much more selective as to where and when orange should be applied.  The use of orange should now be limited to a single hero item per surface in addition to its use as our keyboard focus state.

This change has:

  • Improved visual hierarchy
  • Made error states instantly recognisable
  • Enabled the use of an orange frame as the keyboard navigation focus state

Usage of blue

For many years blue has been used in Ubuntu to alert the user to activities that are neutral (neither positive or negative).  Examples include the Launcher pips changing to blue to give the user a persistent notification of an app alert, or the messaging menu indicator changing to blue to indicate unread messages.

Previously in some (but not all) cases orange was being used to represent select and activity states but effective keyboard navigation had not yet been designed for Unity.

As part of our work on focus states, we also needed to consider a consistent visual language for select states, with a key requirement being that an item could be both focused and selected at the same time.

After much research, experimentation and testing, blue was chosen as the Ubuntu selected state colour.  Blue has also returned to being used for natural activity, for example in progress bars.  The use of blue for selected and other activity states works with almost all other elements, on both dark and light backgrounds, and stands out clearly and precisely when used in combination with a focus state.

Now that our usage of colour is more precisely and consistently defined (with orange = focus, blue = selected and neutral activity), you will see use of orange minimised so that it stands out as a focus state and more blue to replace orange’s previous selection and activity use.

 

Inbox
The sections headers now use blue to indicate which section is selected. This works well with the new focus frame that can be present when keyboard navigation is active.

The future for the palette

Colour is important for aesthetics (the palette needs to visually work together) but it also needs to convey meaning. Therefore a semantic approach is critical for maximum usability.  Some colours have cultural meanings, other colours have meanings applied by their context.

By extending the colours in our palette and organising them in a semantic way, we have created a stable framework of colour that developers can use to build their apps without time consuming and unnecessary work.  We can now be confident that our Suru design values are being consistently applied to every colour related design problem as we move forward with designing and building convergence.

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Steph Wilson

In the coming months we will be rolling out the new app design guidelines, which will give you the latest toolkit best practices and patterns so you can make your own convergent app for Ubuntu.

Why do we need design guidelines?

The guidelines are a big part of communicating design practices and philosophy to the community and the wider audience. Without it, we wouldn’t have consistency in our design language and people who want to develop or design on Ubuntu wouldn’t be able to maintain the identity we so love.

Throughout the guide you will see the rationale behind our design values through the development our Suru visual language and philosophy.

What’s to come?

We are going to start releasing parts of the Building Blocks section first, which contains all the components you need to start building your application.

Back in November last year we took a look at defining styles for the guide e.g. how to illustrate examples of best practice. The guide will feature UI examples of how the component will look inside an app across screen sizes, as well as breaking them apart so you can see what goes where and how.

Here’s a sneak peak…

Screen Shot 2016-05-03 at 09.50.13

Screen Shot 2016-05-11 at 14.35.25

After user testing on the current design guide, users said it was hard to find content as it was lost in the large amounts of text, so we have given the guide a bit of a nip and tuck by balancing visuals and text accordingly.

All new sections

As well as ‘Get Started’, ‘Patterns’ and ‘Building blocks’ we will now introduce: ‘System integration’ and ‘Resources’ to the list, as well as an overview page for each section highlighting key areas.

System integration will feature the number of a touchpoints your app can plug into inside the Ubuntu operating system shell, such as the launcher, notifications and indicators. For example, you can add a count emblem over your app icon inside the Launcher to show unread messages or available updates.

The ‘Resources’ section will feature downloads such as grid layout templates, the new colour palette and our icon set.

Over to you…

We can’t wait to see your app designs and hope that our design practices will help you achieve a great user experience on Ubuntu.

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Grazina Borosko

April marks the release of Xerus 16.4 and with it we bring a new design of our iconic wallpaper. This post will take you through our design process and how we have integrated our Suru visual language.

Evolution

The foundation of our recent designs are based on our Suru visual language, which encompasses our core brand values, bringing consistency across the Ubuntu brand.

Our Suru language is influenced by the minimalist nature of Japanese culture. We have taken elements of their Zen culture that give us a precise yet simplistic rhythm and used it in our designs. Working with paper metaphors we have drawn inspiration from the art of origami that provides us with a solid and tangible foundation to work from. Paper is also transferable, meaning it can be used in all areas of our brand in two and three dimensional forms.

Design process

We started by looking at previously released wallpapers across Ubuntu to see how each has evolved from each other. After seeing the previous designs we started to apply our new Suru patterns, which inspired us to move in a new direction.

Ubuntu 14.10 ‘Utopic Unicorn’’

wallpaper_unicorn

Ubuntu 15.04 ‘Vivid Vervet’

suru-desktop-wallpaper-ubuntu-vivid (1)

Ubuntu 15.10 ‘Wily Werewolf’

ubuntu-1510-wily-werewolf-wallpaper

Step-by-step process

Step 1. Origami animal

Since every new Ubuntu release is named after animal, the Design Team wanted to bring this idea closer to the wallpaper and the Suru language. The folds are part of the origami animal and become the base of which we start our design process.

Origarmi

To make your own origami Xerus squirrel, you can find the instructions here.

Step.2 Searching for the shape

We started to look at different patterns by using various techniques with origami paper. We zoomed into particular folds of the paper, experimented with different light sources, photography, and used various effects to enhance the design.

The idea was to bring actual origami to the wallpaper as much as possible. We had to think about composition that would work across all screen sizes, especially desktop. As the wallpaper is a prominent feature in a desktop environment, we wanted to make sure that it was user friendly, allowing users to find documents and folders located on the computer screen easily. The main priority was to not let the design get in the way of everyday usage, but enhance it aesthetically and provide a great user experience.

After all the experiments with fold patterns and light sources, we started to look at colour. We wanted to integrate both the Ubuntu orange and Canonical aubergine to balance the brightness and played with gradient levels.

We balanced the contrast of the wallpaper color palette by using a long and subtle gradient that kept the bright and feel look. This made the wallpaper became brighter and more colorful.

Step.3 Final product

The result was successful. The new concept and usage of Suru language helped to create a brighter wallpaper that fitted into our overall visual aesthetic. We created a three-dimensional look and feel that gives the feeling of actual origami appearance. The wallpaper is still recognizable as Ubuntu, but at the same time looks fresh and different.

Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

Xerus - purple

Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus ( light version)

Xerus - Grey

What is next?

The Design Team is now looking at ways to bring the Suru language into animation and fold usage. The idea is to bring an overall seamless and consistent experience to the user, whilst reflecting our tone of voice and visual identity.

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Jamie Young

Ubuntu orange update

Recently, you may have seen our new colour palette update in the SDK. One notable change is the new hex code we’ve assigned to Ubuntu Orange for screen use. The new colour is #E95420.

We have a post coming soon that will delve deeper into our new palette but for now we just wanted to make sure this change is reflected on our website while at the same time touching on it through our blog. Our Suru visual language has evolved to have a lighter feel and we’ve adjusted the hex value in order to fit in with the palette as a whole.

We’ve updated our brand colour guidelines to take into account this change as well. You can find the new hex as well as all the tints of this colour that we recommend using in your design work.

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Inayaili de León Persson

Redesigning ubuntu.com’s navigation

Last month, the web team had an offsite (outside of the office) week sprint in Holborn, central London. We don’t all work on exactly the same projects in our day-to-day, so it’s nice to have this type of sprint, where everyone can work together and show each other what we’ve been working on over the last few months.

 

Web team in HolbornThe web team in our offsite in Holborn

 

One of the key items in the agenda for the week was to brainstorm possible solutions for the key areas we want to improve in our navigation.

The last time we did a major redesign of ubuntu.com’s navigation was back in 2013 — time flies! So we thought now would be a good time to explore ways to improve how users navigate Ubuntu’s main website and how they discover other sites in the Ubuntu ecosystem.

Collaborative sketching

On the second day of the sprint, Francesca walked us through the current version of the navigation and explained the four key issues we want to solve. For each of the issues, she also showed how other sites solve similar problems.

While the 2013 navigation redesign solved some of the problems we were facing at the time (poor exposure of our breadth of products was a big issue, for instance) other issues have emerged since then that we’ve been meaning to address for a while.

After Francesca’s intro, we broke into four groups, and each group sketched a solution for each of the issues, which was then presented to everyone so we could discuss.

 

Karl presenting sketches to rest of the teamDiscussing the team’s sketches

 

By having everyone in the team, from UX and visual designers, to developers and project managers, contribute ideas and sketch together, we were able to generate lots of ideas in a very short amount of time. We could move the project forward much more quickly than if one UX or one designer had to come up with ideas by themselves over days or weeks.

Improving the global navigation

 

ubuntu.com global navigation barubuntu.com’s global navigation bar

 

The main things to improve on the global navigation were:

  • Some users don’t see the light grey bar above the main orange navigation
  • Some users think the links in the global nav are part of the ubuntu.com site
  • Important sites sit under the “More” link and do not have enough visibility
  • On the new full width sections, the global nav, main nav and “breadcrumb” form a visual sandwich effect that could create confusion

It was interesting to see the different groups come up similar ideas on how to improve the usability of the global navigation. Some of the suggestions were more simple and others more involved.

The main suggestions for improvement that we discussed were:

  • Rename the “More” link as “More sites” to make it more clear
  • Increase the number of links shown by default by using the full width of the page
  • Explore using different colours for the background, such as a dark grey
  • Explore having a drawer that exposes all Ubuntu sites, instead of the links being on display all the time (like the Bloomberg website)

 

Bloomber's global navigation closed

 

Bloomber's global navigation openOn Bloomberg.com when you click the “Bloomberg the Company & Its Products” link at the top (above) you open a large drawer that exposes the Bloomberg universe of sites.

 

Improving the main navigation

 

ubuntu.com's main navubuntu.com’s main navigation with a dropdown that lists second level links

 

The main ubuntu.com nav is possibly the most crucial part of the navigation that we would like to improve. The key improvements we’d like to work on are:

  • Having the ability to highlight key sections or featured content
  • Rely less on the site’s IA to structure the navigation as it makes it hard to cross-link between different sections (some pages are relevant to more than one section)
  • Improve the visibility of content that lives in the third level (it is currently only accessible via the breadcrumb-style navigation)

Even though the proposed solutions were different from each other, there were some patterns that popped up more than once amongst the different groups:

  • Featured content within the navigation (eg. the original Boston Globe responsive redesign, and Amazon.co.uk)
  • Links that live in more than one place (eg. John Lewis, Marks & Spencer and other retailers)
  • The idea of using the mega menu pattern

 

Boston Globel's original responsive menuIn the first version of the Boston Globe’s redesigned website, the main navigation included simple featured content for each of the sections

 

John Lewis mega menu Home & Garden section

John Lewis mega menu Baby & Child sectionOn the John Lewis website, you can get to nursery furniture from “Home & Garden > Room” and “Baby & Child > Baby & Nursery”

 

Amazon.co.uk displays seasonal ads in their mega menuThe main navigation on Amazon.co.uk includes featured ads

 

Solving the third level links issues

 

ubuntu.com's third level breadcrumb-style navubuntu.com’s breadcrumb-style navigation showing third level links

 

The main issues with the current third level links are:

  • We are using a recognisable design pattern (the breadcrumb) in a not so typical way (as second and third level navigation)
  • When you click on a third level link, you lose the visibility of the second level links, making it harder to understand where you are in the site
  • The pattern isn’t flexible: some of our labels are long, and only a small number of links fit horizontally, even on a large screen

One thing that we are almost certain of is that we will not be able to remove third level links completely from our site, so we need to improve the way we show them.

The most interesting suggestions on how to handle this issue were:

  • Include a table of contents for the section at the top of pages (like GOV.uk)
  • Key third level links could be highlighted in the main navigation menu

 

GOV.uk third level navOn GOV.uk, sections which have sub-sections include an overview of all the sub-sections at the top of every page. This makes it easier to understand the type and breadth of content of that section

 

Improving the footer

 

ubuntu.com's footerubuntu.com’s “fat footer” with three levels of links

 

Ubuntu.com’s footer is certainly the simplest of the problems we want to solve in terms of navigation. But, nonetheless, there are some issues with the current solution:

  • There are too many levels of links in the footer
  • The download section is hidden in the second footer level, despite being one of the main top level links

The most popular idea that came out of the sketching session was to use the space available better, so that sections can be listed in a masonry type grid, rather than one per column like they currently are.

This means we’d need fewer columns to list all important content and expose the IA of the site. It also means we can ditch the middle level of the current footer design (which now holds the About, Support and Download sections).

Next steps

The next step in the navigation redesign project is to build prototypes to test some of the ideas we had in our workshop, and refine the visual direction. We want to see if the assumptions we’ve made are true, and if the patterns are easy and intuitive to use across different screen sizes and devices.

We will then do some user testing and iterate based on the feedback we get.

We might also have to do some IA work alongside the redesign of the main navigation, if we do want to have links that are listed in different sections and if we want to present more curated links based on user tasks in each of the sections.

Stay tuned!

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Jouni Helminen

Visual design of convergent apps

It is an exciting time as we’re starting to see more and more of the new, convergence-enabled UI toolkit and features for Unity 8 come to life. Some classic X11 apps (Gimp, Libre Office and a few others) are already running on Unity 8 using new hardware from our partners, including the award winning M10 tablet from BQ – very cool.

At the same time, we want to help people write or port more applications to our platform, using our modern UI toolkit designed to smoothly flow the user experience through touch and pointer inputs, a range of screen and keyboard types and all of the permutations in between! It has been an interesting design challenge to imagine, design, and begin to build a world where all interfaces, regardless of input type or form factor, all emerge from the same core user experience and design language.

Where we are now

Our UX and SDK teams have been working on version 1.3 of Qt based UI toolkit, which allows developers to write applications that can be used comfortably with both touch and pointer interfaces. The work is still very much in progress, but some of it can be used today. You can check out the developer docs here.

Suru, our visual design language, has evolved into a new, much lighter, flatter and modern approach. It not only looks great (in our humble opinion), but helps app developers design good looking and well-functioning apps with less effort. Continuous visual and user experience refinements will will be rolling out across the whole OS (scopes, shell and apps) this coming year.

The new design guidelines for UX and UI patterns as well as Suru will be out soon. In the meanwhile hopefully these example apps will inspire you to have a look at the developer docs, get active on IRC and have a go yourself. We will also be releasing design source files and templates for the refreshed UI toolkit so that you can start applying them in your own app designs.

Dekko – Email

email-phone-tablet

The first example app is Dekko – the default email client  for mobile and tablet devices from BQ and Meizu. We have been very lucky to have the incredible talents of our community member Dan Chapman working on the development of Dekko, and the app is progressing at a fantastic rate. James Mulholland helped Dan with the UX and I have been working on the UI.

Like many apps, Dekko uses a list view to represent the primary level, and a detail view to show the secondary level. Where there’s room, these views can be displayed side by side, but on small screen screens or very shrunk windows, a PageStack showing only the list becomes the primary screen. On larger screens or expanded windows, the page stack automatically progresses into the familiar two-panel configuration. This adaptive layout is common on responsive websites, and our SDK team have built a component in the UI toolkit that does most of the hard work for you – AdaptivePageLayout.

email-desktop

The list item, which lives in the list component, is another example of ready made component that helps developers write convergent apps with less effort. The new ListItem in our toolkit has useful, well designed default layouts baked in when using ListItemLayout. It is also optimised for both touch and pointer interaction – via ListItemActions. A common pattern of interacting with list items on touch devices is to drag them left or right revealing key actions such as delete. When using a pointer, however, you would typically right click and use the contextual menu to access the same actions. Our UI Toolkit supports both types of input at all times, so you could drag the item left or right using a mobile or touch-enabled monitor, or right click using a mouse. We believe users should be free to mix how they interact with our components using whatever means is at their disposal and to their liking.

This behaviour is already baked into our ListItem component, so users will have a consistent experience when using apps, and developers will save time not having to roll their own solutions.

Music

 convergence-music
The music app is another example of the super talented Ubuntu community getting involved in building some of our core apps together with our internal teams. You might remember Andrew Hayzen and Victor Thompson from a previous interview on this blog. They have since been adding features and functionality to the app, and a convergent music app using multiple panels is currently working in a branch and will be landing in the master release soon. We are also looking at adding support for streaming music functionality, keep an eye out for this in the near future :)

music-closeup

The multi-panel music app reacts to window size changes intelligently – the album cards resize and shuffle themselves on window size changes. On smaller screen devices we have a persistent “Now playing” control bar at the bottom of the screen, but on larger screen sizes we have enough real estate to reimagine the play bar as an extra panel on the right with “Now playing” information, along with cover art, controls and a scrollable queue.

Calendar

convergent_calendar

The calendar app has been on the phone for a while but until now it hadn’t really had any UI design love or designs for larger screens.  We wanted to apply our visual language in the context of an app that is by default very minimal, allowing the few design elements to stand on their own.

Suru, our visual language, is light and flat, minimizing distractions, with carefully selected tones of gray, consistent spacing and margins to help the content breathe. We’ve added considered splashes of highlight colours that enhance the visual hierarchy without overwhelming it.

On the calendar app we are again making use of multiple panels, surfacing several layers when we have the real estate available. The same feature set of the app is of course available on all sizes, and the navigation feels intuitive with whatever input method or screen size you are using.

calendar-closeup

This design hasn’t been implemented yet, and in fact we are looking for new developers to join our Community Team. If you are a developer who would like to get involved in writing some of the core apps people use on Ubuntu – get in touch with alan.pope@canonical.com – we would love to hear from you!

Hopefully these examples have given inspiration and pointers to anyone who would like to have a go at designing apps for convergent Ubuntu. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out – jouni.helminen@canonical.com

 

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Steph Wilson

MWC stand: open for business

Take a look at the final pictures of the stand taken yesterday before we opened for business today!

Pods at MWC

Phone demo pods ready to be played with :)

Entrance to stand MWC

Entrance to the stand  “Phone + OpenStack + NFV + IoT”

Canonical meeting room MWC

The Canonical meeting room

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