Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'design'

Grazina Borosko

April marks the release of Xerus 16.4 and with it we bring a new design of our iconic wallpaper. This post will take you through our design process and how we have integrated our Suru visual language.

Evolution

The foundation of our recent designs are based on our Suru visual language, which encompasses our core brand values, bringing consistency across the Ubuntu brand.

Our Suru language is influenced by the minimalist nature of Japanese culture. We have taken elements of their Zen culture that give us a precise yet simplistic rhythm and used it in our designs. Working with paper metaphors we have drawn inspiration from the art of origami that provides us with a solid and tangible foundation to work from. Paper is also transferable, meaning it can be used in all areas of our brand in two and three dimensional forms.

Design process

We started by looking at previously released wallpapers across Ubuntu to see how each has evolved from each other. After seeing the previous designs we started to apply our new Suru patterns, which inspired us to move in a new direction.

Ubuntu 14.10 ‘Utopic Unicorn’’

wallpaper_unicorn

Ubuntu 15.04 ‘Vivid Vervet’

suru-desktop-wallpaper-ubuntu-vivid (1)

Ubuntu 15.10 ‘Wily Werewolf’

ubuntu-1510-wily-werewolf-wallpaper

Step-by-step process

Step 1. Origami animal

Since every new Ubuntu release is named after animal, the Design Team wanted to bring this idea closer to the wallpaper and the Suru language. The folds are part of the origami animal and become the base of which we start our design process.

Origarmi

Step.2 Searching for the shape

We started to look at different patterns by using various techniques with origami paper. We zoomed into particular folds of the paper, experimented with different light sources, photography, and used various effects to enhance the design.

The idea was to bring actual origami to the wallpaper as much as possible. We had to think about composition that would work across all screen sizes, especially desktop. As the wallpaper is a prominent feature in a desktop environment, we wanted to make sure that it was user friendly, allowing users to find documents and folders located on the computer screen easily. The main priority was to not let the design get in the way of everyday usage, but enhance it aesthetically and provide a great user experience.

After all the experiments with fold patterns and light sources, we started to look at colour. We wanted to integrate both the Ubuntu orange and Canonical aubergine to balance the brightness and played with gradient levels.

We balanced the contrast of the wallpaper color palette by using a long and subtle gradient that kept the bright and feel look. This made the wallpaper became brighter and more colorful.

Step.3 Final product

The result was successful. The new concept and usage of Suru language helped to create a brighter wallpaper that fitted into our overall visual aesthetic. We created a three-dimensional look and feel that gives the feeling of actual origami appearance. The wallpaper is still recognizable as Ubuntu, but at the same time looks fresh and different.

Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

Xerus - purple

Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus ( light version)

Xerus - Grey

What is next?

The Design Team is now looking at ways to bring the Suru language into animation and fold usage. The idea is to bring an overall seamless and consistent experience to the user, whilst reflecting our tone of voice and visual identity.

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Jamie Young

Ubuntu orange update

Recently, you may have seen our new colour palette update in the SDK. One notable change is the new hex code we’ve assigned to Ubuntu Orange for screen use. The new colour is #E95420.

We have a post coming soon that will delve deeper into our new palette but for now we just wanted to make sure this change is reflected on our website while at the same time touching on it through our blog. Our Suru visual language has evolved to have a lighter feel and we’ve adjusted the hex value in order to fit in with the palette as a whole.

We’ve updated our brand colour guidelines to take into account this change as well. You can find the new hex as well as all the tints of this colour that we recommend using in your design work.

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Inayaili de León Persson

Redesigning ubuntu.com’s navigation

Last month, the web team had an offsite (outside of the office) week sprint in Holborn, central London. We don’t all work on exactly the same projects in our day-to-day, so it’s nice to have this type of sprint, where everyone can work together and show each other what we’ve been working on over the last few months.

 

Web team in HolbornThe web team in our offsite in Holborn

 

One of the key items in the agenda for the week was to brainstorm possible solutions for the key areas we want to improve in our navigation.

The last time we did a major redesign of ubuntu.com’s navigation was back in 2013 — time flies! So we thought now would be a good time to explore ways to improve how users navigate Ubuntu’s main website and how they discover other sites in the Ubuntu ecosystem.

Collaborative sketching

On the second day of the sprint, Francesca walked us through the current version of the navigation and explained the four key issues we want to solve. For each of the issues, she also showed how other sites solve similar problems.

While the 2013 navigation redesign solved some of the problems we were facing at the time (poor exposure of our breadth of products was a big issue, for instance) other issues have emerged since then that we’ve been meaning to address for a while.

After Francesca’s intro, we broke into four groups, and each group sketched a solution for each of the issues, which was then presented to everyone so we could discuss.

 

Karl presenting sketches to rest of the teamDiscussing the team’s sketches

 

By having everyone in the team, from UX and visual designers, to developers and project managers, contribute ideas and sketch together, we were able to generate lots of ideas in a very short amount of time. We could move the project forward much more quickly than if one UX or one designer had to come up with ideas by themselves over days or weeks.

Improving the global navigation

 

ubuntu.com global navigation barubuntu.com’s global navigation bar

 

The main things to improve on the global navigation were:

  • Some users don’t see the light grey bar above the main orange navigation
  • Some users think the links in the global nav are part of the ubuntu.com site
  • Important sites sit under the “More” link and do not have enough visibility
  • On the new full width sections, the global nav, main nav and “breadcrumb” form a visual sandwich effect that could create confusion

It was interesting to see the different groups come up similar ideas on how to improve the usability of the global navigation. Some of the suggestions were more simple and others more involved.

The main suggestions for improvement that we discussed were:

  • Rename the “More” link as “More sites” to make it more clear
  • Increase the number of links shown by default by using the full width of the page
  • Explore using different colours for the background, such as a dark grey
  • Explore having a drawer that exposes all Ubuntu sites, instead of the links being on display all the time (like the Bloomberg website)

 

Bloomber's global navigation closed

 

Bloomber's global navigation openOn Bloomberg.com when you click the “Bloomberg the Company & Its Products” link at the top (above) you open a large drawer that exposes the Bloomberg universe of sites.

 

Improving the main navigation

 

ubuntu.com's main navubuntu.com’s main navigation with a dropdown that lists second level links

 

The main ubuntu.com nav is possibly the most crucial part of the navigation that we would like to improve. The key improvements we’d like to work on are:

  • Having the ability to highlight key sections or featured content
  • Rely less on the site’s IA to structure the navigation as it makes it hard to cross-link between different sections (some pages are relevant to more than one section)
  • Improve the visibility of content that lives in the third level (it is currently only accessible via the breadcrumb-style navigation)

Even though the proposed solutions were different from each other, there were some patterns that popped up more than once amongst the different groups:

  • Featured content within the navigation (eg. the original Boston Globe responsive redesign, and Amazon.co.uk)
  • Links that live in more than one place (eg. John Lewis, Marks & Spencer and other retailers)
  • The idea of using the mega menu pattern

 

Boston Globel's original responsive menuIn the first version of the Boston Globe’s redesigned website, the main navigation included simple featured content for each of the sections

 

John Lewis mega menu Home & Garden section

John Lewis mega menu Baby & Child sectionOn the John Lewis website, you can get to nursery furniture from “Home & Garden > Room” and “Baby & Child > Baby & Nursery”

 

Amazon.co.uk displays seasonal ads in their mega menuThe main navigation on Amazon.co.uk includes featured ads

 

Solving the third level links issues

 

ubuntu.com's third level breadcrumb-style navubuntu.com’s breadcrumb-style navigation showing third level links

 

The main issues with the current third level links are:

  • We are using a recognisable design pattern (the breadcrumb) in a not so typical way (as second and third level navigation)
  • When you click on a third level link, you lose the visibility of the second level links, making it harder to understand where you are in the site
  • The pattern isn’t flexible: some of our labels are long, and only a small number of links fit horizontally, even on a large screen

One thing that we are almost certain of is that we will not be able to remove third level links completely from our site, so we need to improve the way we show them.

The most interesting suggestions on how to handle this issue were:

  • Include a table of contents for the section at the top of pages (like GOV.uk)
  • Key third level links could be highlighted in the main navigation menu

 

GOV.uk third level navOn GOV.uk, sections which have sub-sections include an overview of all the sub-sections at the top of every page. This makes it easier to understand the type and breadth of content of that section

 

Improving the footer

 

ubuntu.com's footerubuntu.com’s “fat footer” with three levels of links

 

Ubuntu.com’s footer is certainly the simplest of the problems we want to solve in terms of navigation. But, nonetheless, there are some issues with the current solution:

  • There are too many levels of links in the footer
  • The download section is hidden in the second footer level, despite being one of the main top level links

The most popular idea that came out of the sketching session was to use the space available better, so that sections can be listed in a masonry type grid, rather than one per column like they currently are.

This means we’d need fewer columns to list all important content and expose the IA of the site. It also means we can ditch the middle level of the current footer design (which now holds the About, Support and Download sections).

Next steps

The next step in the navigation redesign project is to build prototypes to test some of the ideas we had in our workshop, and refine the visual direction. We want to see if the assumptions we’ve made are true, and if the patterns are easy and intuitive to use across different screen sizes and devices.

We will then do some user testing and iterate based on the feedback we get.

We might also have to do some IA work alongside the redesign of the main navigation, if we do want to have links that are listed in different sections and if we want to present more curated links based on user tasks in each of the sections.

Stay tuned!

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Jouni Helminen

Visual design of convergent apps

It is an exciting time as we’re starting to see more and more of the new, convergence-enabled UI toolkit and features for Unity 8 come to life. Some classic X11 apps (Gimp, Libre Office and a few others) are already running on Unity 8 using new hardware from our partners, including the award winning M10 tablet from BQ – very cool.

At the same time, we want to help people write or port more applications to our platform, using our modern UI toolkit designed to smoothly flow the user experience through touch and pointer inputs, a range of screen and keyboard types and all of the permutations in between! It has been an interesting design challenge to imagine, design, and begin to build a world where all interfaces, regardless of input type or form factor, all emerge from the same core user experience and design language.

Where we are now

Our UX and SDK teams have been working on version 1.3 of Qt based UI toolkit, which allows developers to write applications that can be used comfortably with both touch and pointer interfaces. The work is still very much in progress, but some of it can be used today. You can check out the developer docs here.

Suru, our visual design language, has evolved into a new, much lighter, flatter and modern approach. It not only looks great (in our humble opinion), but helps app developers design good looking and well-functioning apps with less effort. Continuous visual and user experience refinements will will be rolling out across the whole OS (scopes, shell and apps) this coming year.

The new design guidelines for UX and UI patterns as well as Suru will be out soon. In the meanwhile hopefully these example apps will inspire you to have a look at the developer docs, get active on IRC and have a go yourself. We will also be releasing design source files and templates for the refreshed UI toolkit so that you can start applying them in your own app designs.

Dekko – Email

email-phone-tablet

The first example app is Dekko – the default email client  for mobile and tablet devices from BQ and Meizu. We have been very lucky to have the incredible talents of our community member Dan Chapman working on the development of Dekko, and the app is progressing at a fantastic rate. James Mulholland helped Dan with the UX and I have been working on the UI.

Like many apps, Dekko uses a list view to represent the primary level, and a detail view to show the secondary level. Where there’s room, these views can be displayed side by side, but on small screen screens or very shrunk windows, a PageStack showing only the list becomes the primary screen. On larger screens or expanded windows, the page stack automatically progresses into the familiar two-panel configuration. This adaptive layout is common on responsive websites, and our SDK team have built a component in the UI toolkit that does most of the hard work for you – AdaptivePageLayout.

email-desktop

The list item, which lives in the list component, is another example of ready made component that helps developers write convergent apps with less effort. The new ListItem in our toolkit has useful, well designed default layouts baked in when using ListItemLayout. It is also optimised for both touch and pointer interaction – via ListItemActions. A common pattern of interacting with list items on touch devices is to drag them left or right revealing key actions such as delete. When using a pointer, however, you would typically right click and use the contextual menu to access the same actions. Our UI Toolkit supports both types of input at all times, so you could drag the item left or right using a mobile or touch-enabled monitor, or right click using a mouse. We believe users should be free to mix how they interact with our components using whatever means is at their disposal and to their liking.

This behaviour is already baked into our ListItem component, so users will have a consistent experience when using apps, and developers will save time not having to roll their own solutions.

Music

 convergence-music
The music app is another example of the super talented Ubuntu community getting involved in building some of our core apps together with our internal teams. You might remember Andrew Hayzen and Victor Thompson from a previous interview on this blog. They have since been adding features and functionality to the app, and a convergent music app using multiple panels is currently working in a branch and will be landing in the master release soon. We are also looking at adding support for streaming music functionality, keep an eye out for this in the near future :)

music-closeup

The multi-panel music app reacts to window size changes intelligently – the album cards resize and shuffle themselves on window size changes. On smaller screen devices we have a persistent “Now playing” control bar at the bottom of the screen, but on larger screen sizes we have enough real estate to reimagine the play bar as an extra panel on the right with “Now playing” information, along with cover art, controls and a scrollable queue.

Calendar

convergent_calendar

The calendar app has been on the phone for a while but until now it hadn’t really had any UI design love or designs for larger screens.  We wanted to apply our visual language in the context of an app that is by default very minimal, allowing the few design elements to stand on their own.

Suru, our visual language, is light and flat, minimizing distractions, with carefully selected tones of gray, consistent spacing and margins to help the content breathe. We’ve added considered splashes of highlight colours that enhance the visual hierarchy without overwhelming it.

On the calendar app we are again making use of multiple panels, surfacing several layers when we have the real estate available. The same feature set of the app is of course available on all sizes, and the navigation feels intuitive with whatever input method or screen size you are using.

calendar-closeup

This design hasn’t been implemented yet, and in fact we are looking for new developers to join our Community Team. If you are a developer who would like to get involved in writing some of the core apps people use on Ubuntu – get in touch with alan.pope@canonical.com – we would love to hear from you!

Hopefully these examples have given inspiration and pointers to anyone who would like to have a go at designing apps for convergent Ubuntu. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out – jouni.helminen@canonical.com

 

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Steph Wilson

MWC stand: open for business

Take a look at the final pictures of the stand taken yesterday before we opened for business today!

Pods at MWC

Phone demo pods ready to be played with :)

Entrance to stand MWC

Entrance to the stand  “Phone + OpenStack + NFV + IoT”

Canonical meeting room MWC

The Canonical meeting room

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Steph Wilson

With MWC just two days away, the final preparations are now in full swing. The stand is looking bigger and brighter than ever and we cannot wait to share it with you.

Final preperations: MWC

IMG_4176

Final prep: MWC

 

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Steph Wilson

It’s day 3 and the stand is nearing completion. The funky lights have been fitted, the meeting rooms have curvaceous walls inspired by the Ubuntu shape, and the cloud and phone demo pods are ready to rock some products for you to try.

Stay tuned tomorrow for some final pictures of behind the scenes at MWC!

Canonical-Build-Photos-9

One of the meeting rooms

photo_2016-02-19_15-55-27

 

Canonical-Build-Photos-7

Rectangular demo pods that will feature various cloud products

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Steph Wilson

It’s day two behind the scenes at MWC and the stand is starting to take shape. The iconic orange Ubuntu flags are up, the walls and doors have been assembled, and the flooring has been put down. We are nearly there…

Day 2: MWC

 

Day 2: MWC

Day 2: MWC

Stay tuned tomorrow to see our final preparations for the stand.

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Steph Wilson

With Mobile World Congress just around the corner, work has now commenced on our biggest stand to date!

Over the next week we will be posting pictures of the stand so you can see how it all comes together.

Day one:

Day 1 MWC

This year we are in the Main Hall – taking up more space :)

Day 1 MWC

Day 1 MWC

The flags are up!

Stay tuned for more pictures of the stand tomorrow

 

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Inayaili de León Persson

A new look for tablet

Today we launched a new and redesigned tablet section on ubuntu.com that introduces all the cool features of the upcoming BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet.

Breaking out of the box

In this redesign, we have broken out of the box, removing the container that previously held the content of the pages. This makes each page feel more spacious, giving the text and the images plenty of room to shine.

This is something we’ve wanted to do for a while across the entire site, so we thought that having the beautiful, large tablet photos to work with gave us a good excuse to try out this new approach.

 

The overview page of the tablet section of ubuntu.com, before (left) and after

 

For most of the section, we’ve used existing patterns from our design framework, but the removal of the container box allowed us to play with how the images behave across different screen sizes. You will notice that if you look at the tablet pages on a medium to small screen, some of the images will be cropped by the edge of the viewport, but if you see the same image in a large screen, you can see it in its entirety.

 



From the top: the same row on a large, medium and small screen

 

How we did it

This project was a concerted effort across the design, marketing, and product management teams.

To understand the key goals for this redesign, we collected the requirements and messaging from the key stakeholders of the project. We then translated all this information into wireframes that guide the reader through what Ubuntu Tablet is. These went through a few rounds of testing and iteration with both users and stakeholders. Finally, we worked with a copywriter to refine the words of each section of the tablet pages.

 

Some of the wireframes

 

To design the pages, we started with exploring the flow of each page in large and small screens in flat mockups, which were quickly built into a fully functioning prototype that we could keep experimenting and testing on.

 

Some of the flat mockups created for the redesign

 

This design process, where we start with flat mockups and move swiftly into a real prototype, is how we design and develop most of our projects, and it is made easier by the existence of a flexible framework and design patterns, that we use (and sometimes break!) as needed.

 


Testing the new tablet section on real devices

 

To showcase the beautiful tablet screen designs on the new BQ tablet, we coordinated with professional photographers to deliver the stunning images of the real device that you can enjoy along every new page of the section.

 

One of the many beautiful device photos used across the new tablet section of ubuntu.com

 

Many people were involved in this project, making it possible to deliver a redesign that looks great, and is completed on time — which is always good a thing :)

In the future

In the near future, we want to remove the container box from the other sections of ubuntu.com, although you may see this change being done gradually, section by section, rather than all in one go. We will also be looking at redesigning our navigation, so lots to look forward to.

Now go experience tablet for yourself and let us know what you think!

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Rae Shambrook

In the coming months, users will start noticing things looking more and more different on Ubuntu. As we gradually roll out our new and improved Suru visual language, you’ll see apps and various other bits of the platform take on a lighter, more clean and cohesive look.

Why refresh apps at all?

As Ubuntu brings convergence to life—embracing today’s as well as future devices—our visual style and UI Toolkit need to evolve to support the new world. The changes taking place platform-wide make it simpler for designers and developers to integrate convergence from inception, and help apps come to life equally on mobile or desktop without a lot of additional work. As we apply new convergence UI and UX patterns to general-purpose components like lists and checkboxes, we also seek out opportunities to work with community developers and designers to put the thinking and new components into practice. The Clock app has been one such opportunity.

 

clock_old_design

The Redesign

Our clean, crisp and lucid Suru visual language and style works well with the added functionality required for convergence. There’s less visual distraction and noise than ever, providing a clear pathway to making the most of the new toolkit’s convergence functionality.

Our Suru visual design language is based on origami, with graphic elements containing meaningful folds and shadows to create the illusion of paper and draw focus to certain areas. Using the main clock face’s current animation (where the clock flips from analog to digital on touch) as inspiration, it seemed natural to place a fold in the middle of the clock. On touch, the clock “folds” from analog to digital.

clock_new_design

To further the paper look, drop shadows are used to give the illusion of layers of paper. The shadow under the clock face elevates it from the page, adding a second layer. The drop shadows on the clock hands add yet another layer.

As for colours, the last clock design featured a grey and purple scheme. In our new design, we make use of our very soon-to-be released new color palette. We brightened the interface with a white background and light grey clock face. On the analog clock, the hour and second hands are now Ubuntu orange. With the lighter UI, this subtle use of branding is allowed to stand out more. Also, the purple text is gone in favor of a more readable dark grey.

The bottom edge hint has also been redesigned. The new design is much more minimal, letting users get used to the gesture without interrupting the content too much.

In the stopwatch section, the fold is absent from the clock face since the element is static. We also utilize our new button styling. In keeping with the origami theme, the buttons now have a subtle drop shadow rather than an inward shadow, to again create a more “paper” feel.

stopwatch_design

This project has been one of my favorites so far. Although it wasn’t a complete redesign (the functionality remains the same) it was fun seeing how the clock would evolve next. Hope you enjoy the new version of the clock, it’s currently in development so look out for it on your phones soon and stay tuned for more visual changes.

Visual Design: Rae Shambrook

UX Design: James Mulholland

 

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Femma

We arrived in Helsinki on Sunday evening, ready to start our week long SDK sprint on Monday. Our hotel was in a nice location, by the sea.

The work stuff

The SDK is a core part of Ubuntu and provides an array of components and flexibility needed to create applications across staged and windowed form factors, with good design and user experience in mind.

The purpose of the sprint was to have the designers and engineers come together to work on tools and components such as palette themes, bottom edge, header, scrollbars, focus handling, dialogs, buttons, menus, text selections and developer tasks such as IDE, packaging and application startup.

Monday morning started with walking into our venue that looked somewhat like a classroom.

 

Classroom

The first task of the day required some physical activity of moving all the tables around so that the environment was much more conducive to a collaborative sprint.

Jouni presenting

Each day we broke off into working groups for our respective sessions and ironed out any existing issues, as well as working through new and exciting features that would enhance different SDK components.

Theme palette sessionJamie, Pierre and Zsombor working hard on the colour palette.

Jamie the professor

Old school pointing devices, Jamie gives it a go, looking very much like a professor!

What we achieved

During the course of the week we achieved what we’d set out to do:

  • Amended the theme palette to include any missing colours and then apply these to various components
  • Completed the implementation and release the bottom edge component into the staging environment
  • Completed the section scrolling prototype and have it reviewed by visual design and UX
  • Completed the portrait and landscape edit mode header prototype
  • Worked out behaviour of complex SDK components for focus handling and added some best practice examples to the specification
  • Communicated and gained concensus on the context menu design, who are now gearing up for some pre-requisite work and then implementation of context menus
  • Prepared the visual rules for buttons and made the Ubuntu shape ready to use for buttons
  • Completed the design for sliders  
  • Discussed a tree view component for navigation
  • Created a first draft of tabs wireframes and functionality agreed
  • Created a first draft of text selections visuals and reviewed, UX and functionality was discussed ready to include in the specification
  • Created the Libertine packaging project and containers
  • Tidied up the IDE
  • Created some Snapp packages and got them working
  • Ramped up some new  investigative work that arose in our collaboration

The planets aligned… literally

In the early hours of Wednesday morning  (before breakfast) a few of us managed to witnessed a planetary conjunction (Venus, Mars and Jupiter) which was truly amazing… a surprise benefit of sprinting in the arctic circle.
Even though there were a few hours of daylight, we managed to embrace the cold and stand outside to enjoy the beautiful views during lunch and coffee breaks.

The bay

All in all, it was a very productive and fun sprint. We left with a sense of accomplishment and camaraderie.

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Matthieu James

An expanded device mono icon set

We will soon push an update of the Suru icon theme that includes more device icons in order to support the Ubuntu convergence story.

Because the existing icon set was focused on mobile, many of the new icons are very specific to the desktop, as we were missing icons such as hard disk, optical drive, printer or touchpad.

When designing new mono icons, we need to make sure that they are consistent with the graphic style of the existing set (thin outlines, rare solid shapes, etc).

A device, like a printer or a hard disk, can be quite complex if you want to make it look realistic, so it’s important to add a level of abstraction to the design. However the icon still has to be recognisable within the right context.

At the moment, if you compare the Suru icon theme to the symbolic mono icons in Gnome, or to the Humanity devices icons, a few icons are missing, so you should expect to see this set expand at some point in the future — but the most common devices are covered.

In the meantime, here is the current full set:

Device icon set

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Steph Wilson

Today we celebrate our amazing Ubuntu Community and show our appreciation for all the hard work put into making Ubuntu what it is today.

Ubuntu is not just an operating system, it is a whole community in which everybody collaborates with everybody to bring to the life a wonderful human experience. When you download the ISO, burn it, install it and start to enjoy it, you know that a lot of people made magnificent efforts to deliver the best Ubuntu OS possible.

To show our appreciation, the Community Managers and Designers have nominated several community application developers to receive a special thank you for their outstanding work:

  • Dan Chapman (dekko)
  • Boren Zhang (dekko)
  • Kunal Parmar (calendar)
  • Stefano Verzegnassi (docviewer)
  • Riccardo Padovani (calculator, notes)
  • Bartosz Kosiorek (calculator, clock)
  • Roman Shchekin (shorts, docviewer)
  • Joey Chan (shorts)
  • Victor Thomson (music, weather)
  • Andrew Hazen (music, weather)
  • Nekhelesh Ramananthan (clock)
  • Niklas Wenzel (terminal, dekko/platform)

We’ll send everyone an official Ubuntu keychain and sticker pack.


 

We also got hold of some other special Ubuntu items and because it is impossible to pick favourites, names were drawn out of a hat:

1 

 

The following folks will be receiving a special Ubuntu gift from us:


3rd prize: An official Ubuntu hat – Niklas Wenzel

 

2nd prize: An official Ubuntu pad from Castelli – Andrew Hazen

 

1st prize: An official Ubuntu wireless mouse from Xoopar – Joey Chan

 

Well done guys!

Community Appreciation Day merchandise pack

Models not included.


Show your appreciation:

  • Ping an IRC Ubuntu channel and leave a thank you
  • Send an email to a mailing list; you can do it to a LoCo mailing list
  • On social media:
  • Or if you see a community member in the street, go up to them and give them a well-deserved pat on the back :)

For everyone who works out of passion and love for Ubuntu: we thank you, and hope it will encourage more contributors to join and make Ubuntu even better!

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Elvi

After many hours of research, testing and never-ending questions about structure, design, aesthetics and function, we’re very happy to announce that Jujucharms has a new homepage!

All through this site redesign, our main aim has been to make complex content easy to digest and more fun to read. We’ve strived to create a website that not only looks beautiful, but also succeeds in thoroughly explaining what Juju is and the way it can improve your workflow.

Key content is now featured more prominently. We wanted the homepage to be illustrative and functional, hence the positioning of a bold headline and clear call to action which users immediately see as they access the site.

One of the key change between the old homepage and the new is the addition of two visual diagrams, which we have made sure to optimise for whichever device users may be accessing the site with. The first diagram explains the most relevant aspects of the service and how users can incorporate it into their workflow (Fig. 1). The second explains the different elements that compose Juju and the way the service works at a technical level (Fig. 2).

jujucharms-home-diagramFigure 1.

jujucharms-home-2Figure 2.

After scrolling, visitors encounter a section which allows direct access into the store, encouraging them to explore the wide range of services it offers. This allows for a more hands-on discovery and understanding of what Juju is – users can either start designing straight away, test it, or explore the site if they wish to find more information before trying it out.

Jujucharms.com homepage discovery

Overall, we’ve made sure to re-design our homepage in a way that truly benefits our audience. In order to do so we conducted numerous user testing sessions throughout the development of the site and re-iterated the designs based on our user’s feedback. This approach enabled us to understand which content and elements should be prioritised and define the best way to evolve the design.

We collaboratively reviewed and analysed our findings as a team throughout the process and made decisions on next steps to take. After quite a few iterations we hope to have designed a homepage which reflects the core concept and benefits of Juju, and that it becomes something that users will want to come back to.

We hope you like it and look forward to hearing your thoughts about it!

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Inayaili de León Persson

Ubuntu 15.10 is here!

And ubuntu.com has a brand new homepage too!

The new homepage gives a better overview and links to all Ubuntu products. We also wanted to give visitors easy access to the latest Ubuntu news, so we’ve included a ‘latest news’ strip right below the big intro hero with links to featured articles on Ubuntu Insights.

We’ve also improved the content and flow of the cloud section, and brought the phone and desktop sections up to date.

Let us know what you think. And try the new Ubuntu 15.10!

ubuntu.com homepage before and after release

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James Mulholland

We sat down with Dekko star Dan Chapman to get an insight into how he got involved with Ubuntu and his excitement for the release of the Pocket Desktop.

me

Dan has been an active member of the Community since 2013, where he has worked closely with our Design Team to create one of our first convergent showcase apps: Dekko. He also helps out with the Ubuntu QA community with package testing and automated tests for the ubuntu-autopilot-tests project.

The Dekko app is an email client that we are currently developing to work across all devices: mobile, tablet and desktop. If you are interested in contributing to Dekko, whether that be writing code, testing, documentation, translations or have some super cool ideas you would just like to discuss. Then please do get in touch, all contributions are welcomed!

Dan can be reached by email dpniel@ubuntu.com or pop by #dekko on irc.freenode.net or see his wiki page https://wiki.ubuntu.com/dpniel

Early Dekko exploration

Dekko Phone Retro 1

What inspired you to contribute?

I first got involved with the Community in 2013, where Nicholas Skaggs introduced me to the Quality Team to write test cases for automated testing for the Platform. I can’t remember why I started exactly, but I saw it as an opportunity to improve it. Ever since then it’s been a well worth it experience.

What is it about open source that you like?

I like the fact that in the Community everyone has a common goal to build something great.

How does it fit into your lifestyle?

I study from home at the moment so I have to divide my time between my family, Ubuntu and my studies.

What I do for Ubuntu and my course are quite closely tied. The stuff I do for Ubuntu is giving me real life practical skills that I can relate to my course, which is mainly theory based.

Have you made your work with the Ubuntu Community an integral part of your studies as well?

I’m actually doing a project at the moment that is to do with my work on Dekko, but it’s for interacting with an exchange server and implementing a client side library. Hopefully when that’s done I can bring it into Dekko on a later date. I try to keep my interests parallel.

How much time does it take you to develop an app?

Quite a large proportion of my time goes towards Ubuntu.

How is it working remotely?

I find it more than effective. I mean it would be great to meet people face-to-face too.

Dekko development

Dekko Phone Retro 2

What are you most excited about?

Being able to have a full-blown computer in my pocket. As soon as it’s available i’m having the pocket desktop.

Do you use your Ubuntu phone as your main device?

I do yes. The rest of the family do too. I even got my eldest boy, who’s 9 to use it, as well as my partner and mother-in-law.

How is it working with the Ubuntu Design Team?

It’s been great actually because i’m useless at design. There’s always something to improve on, so even if the designs aren’t ready there’s still enough to work on. There hasn’t been big waits in-between or waiting for you guys as you’re busy. The support is there if you need it.

Have you faced any challenges when working on an app for many form factors (phone, tablet, desktop etc)?

The only challenge is getting the design before the toolkit components are ready. It was a case of creating custom stuff and trying to not cause myself too much pain when I have to switch. The rest has been plain sailing as they toolkit is a breeze to use, and the Design team keep me informed of any changes.

What’s the vibe like in the Community at the moment?

I speak to a fair few of them now through Telegram, that seems to be the place to talk now there’s an app for it. It’s nice you can ping your question to anyone and you’ll get an immediate response relatively quickly. Alan Pope, always gives you answers.

What are you thoughts on the Pocket Desktop?

It is exciting as it’s something different. I don’t think there’s competition, as we all have different target audiences we are reaching to. I’m really excited about where the Platform is heading.

The future of convergent Dekko

Dekko Future

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Steph Wilson

We believe that the first impression matters, especially when it comes to introducing a new product to a user for the first time. Our aim is to delight the user from the moment they open the box, through to the setup wizard that will help them get started with their new phone.

Devices have become an essential part of our everyday lives. We choose carefully the ones we want to adopt, taking into account all manner of factors that influence our lifestyle and how we conduct our everyday tasks. So when buying a totally new product, with unfamiliar software, or from a new brand, you want to make the first impression count in order to seduce and reassure the user that this product is for them.

The out of the box experience (OOBE) is one of the most important categories of software usability. It essentially says how easy your software is to use, as well as introducing the user into your brand through visual design and tone of voice, which can convey familiarity and trust within your product.

How did we do it?

We started to look at research around users past experiences when setting up a new device and their feelings about the whole process. We also took a look at what our competitors were doing, taking into account current patterns and trends in the market.

From gathering this research we started to simplify as much as possible the OOBE workflow. Taking into consideration the good and the bad things, we started to define our design goals:

  • Design for seduction
  • Simplicity
  • Introduce the brand through design
  • Transform the setup wizard

What did we change?

First of all we started from the smallest screen, taking the existing screens we have for mobile and assessing the design faults and bugs.

In order to create a consistent experience across all devices, we drew together common first experiences found on the mobile, tablet and desktop:

  • Choosing a language
  • Wifi setup
  • Choosing a Time Zone
  • Choosing a lock screen option

One of the major changes we wanted to achieve was to give the user the same experience across all devices, moving us closer to achieving a seamless convergent platform.

What did we achieve?

  • We achieved our main aim in creating the same visual experience across all devices.

Convergence

 

  • We defined two types of screens: Primary screen (left), Secondary screen (right)

Image 1

The secondary screens created more space for forms, which helped us to define a consistent and intuitive animation between screens.

 

  • All the dialogs were transformed where possible into full screens. We kept the dialogs only to communicate to the user confirmation or error messages.

Image 2

 

  • The desktop installer was simplified and modernized.

desktop 2

The implementation of the OOBE has already begun and we cannot wait for you to open the box and experience it on your new Ubuntu device.

UX Designer: Andreea Pirvu

Visual Designer: Grazina Borosko

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Tristram Oaten

Publishing Vanilla

We’ve got a new CSS framework at Canonical, named Vanilla. My colleague Ant has a great write-up introducing Vanilla. Essentially it’s a CSS microframework powered by Sass. The build process consists of two steps, an open source build, and a private build.

Open Source Build

While there are inevitably componants that need to be kept private (keys, tokens, etc.) being Canonical, we want to keep much of the build in the open, in addition to the code. We wanted the build to be as automated and close to CI/CD principles as possible. Here’s what happens:

Committing to our github repository kicks off a travis build that runs gulp tests, which include sass-lint. And we also use david-dm.org to make sure our npm dependencies are up to date. All of these have nice badges we can link to right from our github page, so the first thing people see is the heath of our project. I really like this, it keeps us honest, and informs the community.

Not everything can be done with travis, however, as publishing Vanilla to npm, updating our project page and demo site require some private credentials. For the confidential build, we use Jenkins. (formally Hudson, a java-based build management system.).

Private Build with Jenkins

Our Jenkins build does a few things:

  1. Increment the package.json version number
  2. npm publish (package)
  3. Build Sass with npm install
  4. Upload css to our assets server
  5. Update Sassdoc
  6. Update demo site with new CSS

Robin put this functionality together in a neat bash script: publish.sh.

We use this script in a Jenkins build that we kick off with a few parameters, point, minor and major to indicate the version to be updated in package.json. This allows our devs push-button releases on the fly, with the same build, from bugfixes all the way up to stable releases (1.0.0)

After less than 30 seconds, our demo site, which showcases framework elements and their usage, is updated. This demo is styled with the latest version of Vanilla, and also serves as documentation and a test of the CSS. We take advantage of github’s html publishing feature, Github Pages. Anyone can grab – or even hotlink – the files on our release page.

The Future

It’d be nice for the regression test (which we currently just eyeball) to be automated, perhaps with a visual diff tool such as PhantomCSS or a bespoke solution with Selenium.

Wrap-up

Vanilla is ready to hack on, go get it here and tell us what you think! (And yes, you can get it in colours other than Ubuntu Orange)

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Robin Winslow

We recently introduced Vanilla framework, a light-weight styling framework which is intended to replace the old Guidelines framework as the basis for our Ubuntu and Canonical branded sites and others.

One of the reasons we created Vanilla was because we ran into significant problems trying to use Guidelines across multiple different sites because of the way it was made. In this article I’m going to explain how we structured Vanilla to hopefully overcome these problems.

You may wish to skip the rationale and go straight to “Overall structure” or “How to use the framework”.

Who’s it for?

We in Canonical’s design team will definitely be using Vanilla, and we also hope that other teams within Canonical can start to use it (as they did with Guidelines before it).

But most importantly, it would be fantastic if Vanilla offers a solid enough styling basis that members of the wider community feel comfortable using it as well. Guidelines was never really safe for the community at large to use with confidence.

This is why we’ve made an effort to structure Vanilla in such a way that any or all of it can be used with confidence by anyone.

Limitations of Guidelines

Guidelines was initially intended to solve exactly one problem – to be a single resource containing all the styling for ubuntu.com. This would mean that we could update Guidelines whenever we needed to update ubuntu.com’s styling, and those changes would propagate across all our other Ubuntu-branded sites (e.g.: cn.ubuntu.com or developer.ubuntu.com).

So we simply structured the markup of these sites in the same way, and then created a single hosted CSS file, and linked to it from all the sites that needed Ubuntu styling.

As time went on, two large problems with this solution emerged:

  • As over 10 sites were linking to the same CSS file, updating that file became very cumbersome, as we’d have to test the changes on every site first.
  • As the different sites became more individual over time, we found we were having to override the base stylesheet more and more, leading to overly complex and confusing local styling.

This second problem was only exacerbated when we started using Guidelines as the basis for Canonical-branded sites (e.g.: canonical.com) as well, which had a significantly different look.

Architecture goals for Vanilla

Learning from our experiences with Guidelines, we planned to solve a few specific problems with Vanilla:

  • Website projects could include only the CSS code they actually needed, so they don’t have to override lots of unnecessary CSS.
  • We could release new changes to the framework without worrying about breaking existing sites, allowing us to iterate quickly.
  • Other projects could still easily copy the styles we use on our sites with minimal work

To solve these problems, we decided on the following goals:

  • Create a basic framework (Vanilla) which only contains the common elements shared across all our sites.

    • This framework should be written in a modular way, so it’s easy to include only the parts you need
  • Extend the basic framework in “theme” projects (e.g. ubuntu-vanilla-theme) which will apply specific styling (colours etc.) for that specific brand.

    • These themes should also only contain code which needs to be shared. Site-specific styling should be kept local to the project
  • Still provide hosted compiled CSS for sites to hotlink to if they like, but force them to link to a specific version (e.g. vanilla-framework-version-0.0.15.css) rather than “latest” so that we can release a new version without worry.

Sass modularisation

This modular structure would be impossible in pure CSS. CSS itself offers no mechanism for encapsulation. Fortunately, our team has been using Sass to write our CSS for a while now, and Sass offers some important mechanisms that help us modularise our code. So what we decided to create is actually a Sass mixin library (like Bourbon for example) using the following mechanisms:

Default variables

Setting global variables is essential for the framework, so we can keep consistent settings (e.g. font colours, padding etc.). Variables can also be declared with the !default flag. This allows the framework’s settings to be overridden when extending the framework:

We’ve used this pattern in each of the Vanilla themes we’ve created.

Separating concerns into separate files

Sass’s @import feature allows us to encapsulate our code into files. This not only keeps our code tidier, but it means that anyone hoping to include some parts of our framework can choose which files they want:

Keeping everything in a mixin

When a Sass file is imported any loose CSS is compiled directly to the output. But anything declared inside a @mixin will not be output unless you call the mixin.

Therefore, we set a goal of ensuring that all parts of our library can be imported without any CSS being output, so that you can import the whole module but just choose what you want output into your compiled CSS:

Namespacing

To avoid conflicts with any local sass setup, we decided to namespace all our mixins with the vf- prefix – e.g. vf-grid or vf-header.

Overall structure

Using the aforementioned techniques, we created one base framework, Vanilla Framework, which contains (at the time of writing) 19 separate “modules” (vf-buttons, vf-grid etc.). You can see the latest release of the framework on the project’s homepage, and see the framework in action on the demo page.

The framework can be customised by overriding any of the global settings inside your local Sass, as described above.

We then extended this basic framework with three branded themes which we will use across our sites:

You can of course create your own themes by extending the framework in the same way.

NPM modules

To make it easy to include Vanilla Framework in our projects, we needed to pick a package manager to use for installing it and tracking versions. We experimented with Bower, but in the end we decided to use the Node package manager. So now anyone can install and use any of the following packages:

Hotlinks for compiled CSS

Although for in-depth usage of our framework we recommend that you install and extend it locally, we also provide hosted compiled CSS files, both minified and unminified, for the Vanilla framework itself and all Vanilla themes, which you can hotlink to if you like.

To find the links to the latest compiled CSS files, please visit the project homepage.

How to use the framework

The simplest way to use the framework is to hotlink to it. To do this, simply link to the latest version (minified or unminified) directly in your HTML:

However, if you want to take full advantage of the framework’s modular nature, you’ll probably want to install it directly in your project.

To do this, add the latest version of vanilla-framework to your project’s package.json as follows:

Then, after you’ve npm installed, include the framework from the node_modules folder:

The future

We will continue to develop Vanilla Framework, with version 0.1.0 just around the corner. You can track our progress over on the project homepage and on Github.

In the near future we’ll switch over ubuntu.com and canonical.com to using it, and when we do we’ll definitely blog about it.

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