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Martin Pool

Jelmer writes:

bzr-builddeb 2.8.1 has just landed on Debian Sid and Ubuntu Precise. This version contains some of my improvements from late last year for the handling of quilt patches in packaging branches. Most of these improvements depend on bzr 2.5 beta 5, which is also in Sid/Precise.

The most relevant changes (enabled by default) are:

  • ‘bzr merge-package’ is now integrated into ‘bzr merge’ (it’s just a hook that fires on merges involving packages)
  • patches are automatically unapplied in relevant trees before merges
  • before a commit, bzr will warn if you have some applied and some unapplied quilt patches

Furthermore, you can now specify whether you would like bzr to automatically apply all patches for stored data and whether you would like to automatically have them applied in your working tree by setting ‘quilt-tree-policy‘ and ‘quilt-commit-policy‘ to either ‘applied‘ or ‘unapplied‘. This means that you can have the patches unapplied in the repository, but automatically have them applied upon checkout or update. Setting these configuration options to an empty string causes bzr to not touch your patches during commits, checkout or update.

We’ve done some testing of it, as well as running through a package merge involving patches with Barry, but none of us do package merges regularly. If you do run into issues or if you think there are ways we can improve the quilt handling further, please comment here or file a bug report against the UDD project.

Caveats:

  • If there are patches to unapply for the OTHER tree, bzr will currently create a separate checkout and unapply the patches there. This may have performance consequences for big packages. The best way to prevent this is to set ‘quilt-commit-policy = unapplied‘.
  • bzr merge‘ will now fail if you are merging in a packaging tree that is lacking pristine tar metadata; I’m submitting a fix for this, but it’s not in 2.8.1.
  • if you set ‘quilt-commit-policy‘ and ‘quilt-tree-policy‘ but have them set to a different value, bzr will consider the tree to have changes.

To disable the automatic unapplying of patches and fall back to the previous behaviour, set the following in your builddeb configuration:

quilt-smart-merge = False

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Martin gz

Last week was the Bazaar sprint, which was fantastic and tiring. Somehow even the people who’d been at UDS just before made it through five packed days of fixing bugs, preparing releases, and debugging package imports. We were most hospitably hosted at the Canonical offices a long way up Millbank tower. But even those who couldn’t be there in person to enjoy the view were part of the experience. At home in the Ukraine Alexander wore his Bazaar shirt in support during the first day. On IRC larstiq and santagada ran the test suite on pypy and investigated incompatibilities. And all week we had a small robot John sitting in the middle of the table on the line from the Netherlands, working on performance bugs and offering helpful advice.

There were two new faces introduced. Max has been a stalwart maintaining the ~bzr PPAs and getting daily builds working. Jonathan is joining the Bazaar team on rotation from Kubuntu, which is very exciting for fans of qbzr. He started getting to know bzrlib by taking on some bugs tagged ‘easy’ and pair programming on harder ones. It was a bit tough to keep track of everything going on, but good progress was made on the Ubuntu Distributed Development front, the translation framework branches Naoki put together were landed, and lots of pet bugs were fixed. Download bzr 2.4b3 now to see the rest of the results for yourself.

After these long days in front of screens a nice meal out was a welcome treat. Over dinner we even managed to get on to topics other than code on occasion. On Thursday evening everyone went to As You Like It at the Globe as groundlings. Even with the language barrier to overcome for some of the sprinters, the comedy lived up to the categorisation. Trying to use the cycle hire scheme to travel there and back proved more of an obstacle. The bikes themselves were fine, provided you could get past the terrible computer interface and persuade the system to let you rent them. Now, if only they took patches for that…

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