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Posts tagged with 'power'

Colin Ian King

Measuring power consumption on low power devices really is not as simple as running tools such as PowerTop and then assuming the data is trustworthy.  I shall explain why.

With Ubuntu on the Nexus 7, the battery driver originally provided battery capacity in terms of percentage full, which lacked precision to make any sane power consumption estimates.   We tweaked the battery driver so that we could get battery capacity in terms of uWh from the bq27541 battery fuel gauge.  From this, one can measure the change in capacity over time and estimate the power consumed by the device.

For the Ubuntu 12.04 Precise release I wrote the lightweight power measurement tool "powerstat" to try to determine power consumption using the change in battery capacity.  Powerstat can gather changes in the battery capacity level and by using a simple sliding window on the samples it gives an estimate on the power being consumed over time.  With laptops that consume a lot of power this provides a reasonable rough estimate of power consumption.

The tweak to the Nexus 7 battery driver allows powerstat to work on the Nexus 7 running Ubuntu.  So how trustworthy is the battery data from the battery fuel gauge?  Is the data reliable if we repeat the test under the same conditions?  Do we get consistent readings over time?

For my first set of tests, I fully charged the Nexus 7 and then fully loaded the 4 CPUs with busy loops and then ran multiple powerstat tests; powerstat gathers samples over 8 minutes and estimates power consumption. It also calculates the standard deviation from these samples to give us some idea of the variability of the battery power measurements.    For each powerstat test I logged the battery voltage level, the % battery capacity (normalized to a range of 0..1 to make it easier to plot), the estimated power consumption (with its standard deviation) and then plotted the results:

With this test the machine is in a steady state, we are not changing the load on the CPUs, so one should expect a steady power measurement.  But as one can see, the battery gauge informs us that the voltage is dropping over time (from ~4V down to ~3.25V) and the estimated power also varies from 4.6W down to 3.3W.  So, clearly, the power estimate will depend on the level of charge in the battery.

I also measured an idle machine:

Again, voltage drops over time and estimated power drops too.  More interesting is that the estimated power measurement is not particularly smooth over time as shown by the plot of the standard deviation too.   We can therefore conclude that a lightly loaded machine has a lot of variability in the estimated power consumption data and this means we cannot realistically measure subtle power optimization tweaks made to the software as there is just too much variability in the data.

I re-ran the idle test over several days, running from the same fully charged state to a completely empty battery, and compared runs.  I got variability in the duration of the test (+/- 5%). Also, comparing estimated power consumption at the 100%, 75%, 50% and 25% battery capacity points also shows a lot of variability. This means one cannot get accurate and repeatable power estimations even when the battery is charged at specific capacities.

So next time somebody tells you that the latest changes made their low power device suck more (or less!) power than the previous release and their findings are based on data derived from battery fuel gauge, take it with a pinch of salt.  

The only reliable way to measure instantaneous power consumption is using specialised precision equipment that has been accurately calibrated.

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Colin Ian King

The Ubuntu Kernel Team has uploaded a new kernel (3.2.0-17.27) which contains an additional fix to resolve the remaining issues seen with the RC6 power saving enabled. For users with Sandy Bridge based hardware we would appreciate them to run the tests described on https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Kernel/PowerManagementRC6 and add their results to that page.

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Colin Ian King

The Ubuntu Kernel Team has released a call for testing for a set of RC6 power saving patches for Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin LTS. Quoting Leann Ogasawara's email to the ubuntu kernel team and ubuntu-devel mailing lists:

"Hi All,

RC6 is a technology which allows the GPU to go into a very low power consumption state when the GPU is idle (down to 0V). It results in considerable power savings when this stage is activated. When comparing under idle loads with machine state where RC6 is disabled, improved power usage of around 40-60% has been witnessed [1].

Up until recently, RC6 was disabled by default for Sandy Bridge systems due to reports of hangs and graphics corruption issues when RC6 was enabled. Intel has now asserted that RC6p (deep RC6) is responsible for the RC6 related issues on Sandy Bridge. As a result, a patch has recently been submitted upstream to disable RC6p for Sandy Bridge [2].

In an effort to provide more exposure and testing for this proposed patch, the Ubuntu Kernel Team has applied this patch to 3.2.0-17.26 and newer Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin kernels. We have additionally enabled plain RC6 by default on Sandy Bridge systems so that users can benefit from the improved power savings by default.

We have decided to post a widespread call for testing from Sandy Bridge owners running Ubuntu 12.04. We hope to capture data which supports the the claims of power saving improvements and therefore justify keeping these patches in the Ubuntu 12.04 kernel. We also want to ensure we do not trigger any issues due to plain RC6 being enabled by default for Sandy Bridge.

If you are running Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise Pangolin) and willing to test and provide feedback, please refer to our PowerManagementRC6 wiki for detailed instructions [3]. Additionally, instructions for reporting any issues with RC6 enabled are also noted on the wiki. We would really appreciate any testing and feedback users are able to provide.

Thanks in advance,
The Ubuntu Kernel Team"

So please contribute to this call for testing by visiting https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Kernel/PowerManagementRC6 and follow the instructions.  Thank you!

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Colin Ian King

Part of my focus this cycle is to see where we can make power saving improvements for Ubuntu Precise 12.04 LTS. There has been a lot of anecdotal evidence of specific machines or power saving features behaving poorly over the past few cycles.   So, armed with a 6.5 digit precision multimeter from Fluke I've been measuring the power consumption on various laptops in different test scenarios to try and answer some outstanding questions:

* Is it safe to enable Matthew Garrett's PCIe ASPM fix?
* Are the power savings suggested by PowerTop useful and can we reliably enabled any of these in pm-utils?
* How accurate are the ACPI battery readings to estimate power consumption?
* Do the existing pm-utils power.d scripts still make sense?
* Which is better for power saving: i386, i386-pae or amd64?
* How much power does the laptop backlight really use?
* Does halving the mouse input rate really save that much more power?
* Should we re-enable Aggressive Link Power Management (ALPM)?
* Are there any misbehaving applications that are consuming too much power?
* What are the root causes of HDD wake-ups
* Which applications and daemons are creating unnecessary wake events?
* How much does the MSR_IA32_ENERGY_PERF_BIAS save us?

..and many more besides!

From some of the analysis and "crowd sourcing" tests it is clear that the PCIe ASPM fix works well, so we've already incorporated that into Precise.

Aggressive Link Power Management (ALPM) is a mechanism where a SATA AHCI controller can put the SATA link that connects to the disk into a very low power mode during periods of zero I/O activity and into an active power state when work needs to be done. Tests show that this can save around 0.5-1.5 Watts of power on a typical system. However, it has been known in the past to not work on some devices, so I've put a call for testing of ALPM out to the community so we can get a better understanding of the power savings vs reliability.

Some of the PowerTop analysis has shown we can save another 1-2 Watts of power by putting USB and PCI controllers of devices like Webcams, SD card controllers, Wireless, Ethernet and Bluetooth  into a lower power state.  Again, we would like to understand the range of power savings across a large set of hardware and to see how reliable this is, so another crowd sourced call for testing has been also set up.

So, if you want to contribute to the testing, please visit the above links and spend just a few tens of minutes to see we can extend the battery life of your laptop or netbook.  And periodically visit https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Kernel/PowerManagement to see if there any new tests you can participate in.

[UPDATE]

I've written some brief notes on power saving tweaks and also some simple recommendations for application developers to follow too.

The thread continues here (part 2)

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Colin Ian King

Last month I wrote about the investigations being undertaken to identify any suitable power savings for Ubuntu Precise 12.04 LTS.  Armed with a suitably accurate 6.5 digit precision Fluke digital multimeter I worked my way through the Kernel Team Power Management Blueprint measuring many numerous configurations and ways to possibly save power.

A broad range of areas were examined, from kernel tweaks, hardware settings to disk wake-ups and application wakeup events.

Quite a handful of misbehaving applications have been identified ranging from frequent unnecessary wake-ups on poll() and select() calls to rather verbose logging of debug messages that stop the disk from going into power saving states.

We also managed to identify and remove pm-utils power.d scripts that didn't actually save any power and even consumed more power on newer Solid State Drives.    By carefully analysing all the PowerTop recommendations we also identified a subset of device power management savings that are shown to be useful and save power across a wide range of machines.   After crowd-source testing these tweaks we have now added them into pm-utils for Ubuntu Precise 12.04 LTS by default.  I'm very grateful to the Ubuntu community for participating in the testing and feedback.

I've written a brief summary of all the test results, however, the full results can be found in the various subdirectories here.   I've also written a very simple set of recommendations to help application developers avoid mistakes that lead to power wasting applications.

We've also set up a Power Management Wiki page that has links to the following:

* Identifying Power Sucking Applications
* Aggressive Link Power Management call for testing
* PCIe Active State Power Management call for testing (now complete)
* Updates to pm utils scripts call for testing (now complete)

..and probably the most useful:

* Power Saving Tweaks

The Power Saving Tweaks page lists a selection of tweaks that can be employed to save power on various machines.  Unfortunately with some hardware these tweaks cause lock-ups or rendering bugs, so they cannot be rolled out by default unless we can find either a definitive list of the broken hardware or a large enough whitelist to enable these on a useful set of working hardware.  Some of the tweaks cannot be rolled out for all machines as users want specific functionality enabled by default, for example, we need to enable Bluetooth for users with bluetooth keyboards and so it is up to the user to chose to disable Bluetooth to save 1-2 Watts of power.

I've also set-up a PPA with a few tools to help measure power and track down misbehaving wake-up events and CPU intensive applications.  These tools don't replace tools like PowerTop and top, but do allow me to track trends on a system over a long running period.   You may find these useful too.

We also have a Ubuntu Power Consumption Project set up to help us track bugs related to power consumption issues and regressions.  

Last, but no way least,  I'd like to thank Steve Langasek and Martin Pitt for all their help with the pm-utils and various fixes to power sucking applications.

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Colin Ian King

Monitoring /proc/timer_stats

The /proc/timer_stats interface allows one to check on timer usage in a Linux system and hence detect any misuse of timers that can cause excessive wake up events (and also waste power).  /proc/timer_stats reports the process id (pid) of a task that initialised the timer, the name of the task, the name of the function that initialised the timer and the name of the timer callback function.  To enable timer sampling, write "1\n" to /proc/timer_stats and to disable write "0\n".

While this interface is simple to use, collecting multiple samples over a long period of time to monitor overall system behaviour takes a little more effort.   To help with this, I've written a very simple tool called eventstat that calculates the rate of events per second and can dump the data in a .csv (comma separated values) format for importing into a spreadsheet such as LibreOffice for further analysis (such as graphing).

In its basic form, eventstat will run ad infinitum and can be halted by control-C. One can also specify the sample period and number of samples to gather, for example:

 sudo eventstat 10 60  

.. this gathers samples every 10 seconds for 60 samples (which equates to 10 minutes).

The -t option specifies an events/second threshold to discard events less than this threshold, for example:  sudo cpustat -t 10 will show events running at 10Hz or higher.

To dump the samples into a .csv file, use the -r option followed by the name of the .csv file.  If you just want to collect just the samples into a .csv file and not see the statistics during the run, use also the -q option, e.g.

 sudo eventstat -q -r event-report.csv


With eventstat you can quickly identify rouge processes that cause a high frequency of wake ups.   Arguably one can do this with tools such as PowerTop, but eventstat was written to allow one to collect the event statistics over a very long period of time and then help to analyse or graph the data in tools such as Libre Office spreadsheet.


The source is available in the following git repository:  git://kernel.ubuntu.com/cking/eventstat.git and in my power management tools PPA: https://launchpad.net/~colin-king/+archive/powermanagement

In an ideal world, application developers should check their code with tools like eventstat or PowerTop to ensure that the application is not misbehaving and causing excessive wake ups especially because abuse of timers could be happening in the supporting libraries that applications may be using.

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Colin Ian King

Back in February I wrote about turning off a PC using the Intel I/O Controller Hub and had some example code to do this, and it was a dirty hack.  I've revised this code to be more aligned with how the Linux kernel does this, namely:

1. Cater for the possible existence of PM1b_EVT_BLK and PM1b_CNT_BLK registers.
2. Clear WAKE_STATUS before transitioning to S5
3. Instead of setting SLP_TYP and SLP_EN on, one sets SLP_TYPE and then finally sets SLP using separate writes.

The refined program requires 4 arguments, namely the port address of the PM1a_EVT_BLK, PM1b_EVT_BLK, PM1a_CNT_BLK and PM1b_CNT_BLK.  If the PM1b_* ports are not defined, then these should be 0.

To find these ports run either:

cat /proc/ioports | grep PM1

or do:

sudo fwts acpidump - | grep PM1 | grep Block:

For example, on a Sandybridge laptop, I have PM1a_EVT_BLK = 0x400, PM1a_CNT_BLK = 0x404 and the PM1b_* ports are not defined, so I use:

sudo ./halt 0x400 0 0x404 0

..and this will transition the laptop to the S5 state very quickly. Needless to say, make sure you have sync'd and/or unmounted your filesystems before doing this.

The PM1_* port addresses from /proc/ioport and the fwts acpidump come from the PM1* configuration data from the ACPI FACP, so if this is wrong, then powering down the machine won't work.  So, if you can't shutdown your machine using this example code then it's possible the FACP is wrong. At this point, one should sanity check the port addresses using the appropriate Southbridge data sheet for your machine - generally speaking look for:

PM1_STS—Power Management 1 Status Register (aka PM1a_EVT_BLK)
PM1_CNT—Power Management 1 Control  (aka PM1a_CNT_BLK)

..however these are offsets from PMBASE which are defined in the LPC Interface PCI Register Address Map so you may require a little bit of work to figure out the addresses of these registers on your hardware.


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Colin Ian King

Making sense of PCIe ASPM

PCI Express based serial linked devices can be managed by Active State Power Management (ASPM) to extend battery life on mobile devices such as laptops and netbooks.  ASPM is a power management protocol that allows an operating system's power management to place the link physical layer into a low power mode and it has the ability to instruct other devices on the link to go into a lower power mode too.

The plus side is that we save power with ASPM, however, it will introduce some latency as the bus needs time to be woken up when in a low power state.
The PCIe specification (version 2.0) defines two power modes:

  • L0s, which set low power mode in in direction on the link (usually from the physical link layer controller downstream)
  • L1, which sets low power mode in both directions on the link, however there is greater wakeup latency.
The Linux ASPM driver implements the nitty-gritty details of ASPM - by default it reads the ASPM config from the PCI configuration space. The ASPM config is contained in one of the Capabilities List items, the head of this is pointed to by CapPntr (offset 0x34 in the Configuration Header).

However, the firmware (BIOS) may have misconfigured the PCI configuration space, and apparently this can cause issues, such as hangs if the link is put into low power and the device cannot handle this.   I managed to dig up some information concerning the ASPM implementation on Windows Vista and this states that the BIOS can indicate that ASPM should be disabled by setting the PCIe ASPM Controls bit in the IACP_BOOT_ARCH flag in the Fixed ACPI Description Table (FADT).
Poking around a bit deeper, it seems that this is a requirement in the ACPI specification to set this bit appropriately.   Version 4.0a of the ACPI specification, Table 5-11 Fixed ACPI Description Table Boot Architecture Flags states for following for bit 4 (PCIe ASPM Controls) of the BOOT_ARCH flag:

"If set, indicates to OSPM that it must not enable OSPM ASPM control on this platform."

Linux checks for this in acpi_pci_init() and will disable ASPM if the bit 4 is set.  But what happens if the BIOS is misconfigured, how can one disable ASPM?
Well, Linux does provide some ASPM driver kernel parameters to allow some level of tweakability.  The following kernel parameters can be used:

  • "pcie_aspm=off" - disables ASPM
  • "pcie_aspm=default" - use default firmware configuration as set in the PCI Express Capabalities list item with ID 0x10
  • "pcie_aspm=performance"  - disables ASPM and clock power management
  • "pcie_aspm=powersave" - highest power saving mode, enable ASPM and clock power management
"pcie_aspm=off" has seemed to help some users with some PCIe devices that case Linux hang at boot time.  I deeply suspect that the IACP_BOOT_ARCH flag may be telling Linux to do this but it's being ignored.

I measured "pcie_aspm=powersave" on one of my netbooks and I believe I get a small amount of power saving, powertop seemed to indicate about 0.2 Watts being saved, but this could be within the margin of error in my measurements.

Anyhow, if you want to tinker with more power savings, maybe overriding the firmware configured defaults with "pcie_aspm=powersave" may help. It's worth a try.
 
p { margin-bottom: 0.28cm; }


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Colin Ian King

Shutting down a PC is normally performed by transitioning the machine into an ACPI S5 state which is achieved by writing some magic value into an ACPI PM control register.  Implementing this is very straight forward once one has navigated a couple of rather information dense documents.

Armed with a copy of an Intel ICH manual one see that section 8.8.3.3 the PM1_CNT (Power Management 1 Control) register is the direct implementation of the ACPI PM1a_CNT_BLK register as described in section 4.7.3.2.1 of version 4.0 of the ACPI specification.


Bits 10:12 control the sleep state type (SLP_TYP), and setting these to 111 selects soft power off. To signal this, one has to set bit 13 to transition into the required sleep state.

On an Intel system, finding the PM1_CNT register is simple, use:

cat /proc/ioports | grep PM1a_CNT_BLK

..on my Dell 1525 this results in:

1004-1005 : ACPI PM1a_CNT_BLK

..so a soft shutdown can be invoked running the following code with root privileges:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/io.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdio.h>

/* PM1 Sleep types */
#define SLP_ON       0
#define SLP_ST_PCLK  1
#define SLP_S3       5
#define SLP_S5       6
#define SLP_SOFT_OFF 7

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
        uint16_t val;

        if (ioperm(0x1004, 2, 1) < 0) {
                printf("Cannot access port 0x1004\n");
                exit(0);
        }
        val = inw(0x1004);
        val &= ~(7 << 10); /* Clear SLP_TYPE */
        val |= (SLP_SOFT_OFF << 10); /* Soft power off */
        val |= (1 << 13);  /* Trigger SLP_EN */
        outw(val, 0x1004);
}

..this is akin to the Vulcan death grip, so make sure that one has sync'd and unmounted file systems first! It's quite impressive to see how quickly can shutdown a machine using this method.

Of course, more rugged implementation would be to determine the PM1a_CNT_BLK register from the Fixed ACPI Description Table (FADT), but happily for us Linux reports this register in /proc/ioports, so it's simple to do from user space.


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Colin Ian King

Saving power on my HPMini (revisited on Lucid)

A while ago I blogged about power saving on my HPMini. Well, today I'm revisiting this using today's Lucid daily and I'm pleased to see that I can save a small amount of power with Lucid compared to Karmic. However, the difference is small - the inaccuracies of estimating power consumption using ACPI may be more significant.

My steps were as follows:

0. Run powertop for about 15 minutes on battery power and note down the recommended power saving tricks.

1. Blacklist Bluetooth, since I don't use this and it really sucks a load of power. To do so, add the following to /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf

blacklist btusb

2. Enable HDA audio powersaving:

echo 1 > /sys/module/snd_hda_intel/parameters/power_save

3. Increase dirty page writeback time:

echo 1500 > /proc/sys/vm/dirty_writeback_centisecs

4. Disable the webcam driver (not sure exactly if this saves much power), add the following to /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf

blacklist uvcvideo

5. Turn down the screen brightness (this saves 0.3 Watts)

6. Disable desktop effects to save some power used by compositing.

7. Disable cursor blinking on the gnome terminal to save 2 wakeups a second, using:

gconftool-2 --type string --set /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default/cursor_blink_mode off

I managed to push the power consumption down to ~6.5 Watts which is an improvement of nearly 1 Watt from my tests on Karmic. Not bad, but I don't fully trust the data from the battery/ACPI and I really need to see how much extra battery life these tweaks give me when I'm using the machine on my travels.

On an idle machine I'm seeing > ~99.0% C4 residency, which is quite acceptable. Running powertop is always leads to insights to saving power, so kudos to Intel for this wonderful utility.


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Colin Ian King

Sensors reporting hot CPU in Maverick

My clunky old Lenovo has and Intel(R) Core(TM) Duo CPU (model 15) which coretemp in Lucid 10.04 assumed TjMax was 85 degrees C but now in Maverick 10.10 believes TjMax is 100 degrees C.

Kernel commit a321cedb12904114e2ba5041a3673ca24deb09c9 attempts to get TjMax from msr 0x1a2. If it fails to read this msr it defaults TjMax to 100 degrees C for CPU models 14, 15, 22 and 26, and one will see the following warning message:

[ 9.650025] coretemp coretemp.0: TjMax is assumed as 100 C!
[ 9.650322] coretemp coretemp.1: TjMax is assumed as 100 C!

For CPU models 23 and 28 (Atoms) TjMax will be 90 or 100 depending if it's a nettop or a netbook. Otherwise the patch will default TjMax to 100 degrees C.

One can check the value of TjMax using:

cat devices/platform/coretemp*/temp1_crit

Coretemp calculates the core temperature of the CPU by subtracting the thermal status from TjMax. Since the default has been increased from 85 to 100 degrees between Lucid and Maverick, the apparent core temperature now reads 15 degrees higher.

Now, if my machine really was running 15 degrees hotter between Lucid and Maverick I would see more power consumption. I checked the power consumption for Lucid and Maverick kernels on my Lenovo in idle and fully loaded CPU states with a power meter and observed that Maverick uses less power, so that's encouraging.

As for the correct value, why did the default change? Well, from what I can understand from several forums that discuss the setting of TjMax is that this is not well documented and not disclosed by Intel, hence the values are rule-of-thumb guesswork.

So, the bottom line is that if your CPU appears to run hot from the core temp readings between Lucid 10.04 and Maverick 10.10 first check to see if TjMax has changed on your hardware.


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Colin Ian King

Hot Laptop

My Lenovo 3000N200 laptop has been playing me up. When I've been fully loading the processor or driving video hard it's been shutting down because of overheating. I suspect periodic SMIs are detecting an overheated CPU and the BIOS just stops the machine to avoid it turning into toast.

Suspecting that the latest 2.6.35 Maverick kernel was the cause I booted with a 2.6.32 Lucid kernel and that didn't help, so it didn't look like an obvious kernel regression.

Well, perhaps it's getting old and cranky - it's nearly 3 years old. Perhaps the thermal paste between the CPU and the heatsink is not working like it should. Since it was most probably a hardware issue I downloaded the service manual and got out the trusty screwdriver and opened it up. Lo and behold 5mm of dust had accumulated over the fan grill which wasn't going to help the poor machine offload all that heat out of the laptop case. I removed the fan, gave it a good clean and removed all the dust from the fan outlet grill.

After reassembly the laptop was good as new. Instead of rebooting at 95+ degrees Celsius the Lenovo now runs happily.

The moral of the story is that I should regularly service the fans on my machines. Cooking the CPU is something I would like to avoid in the future.


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Colin Ian King

Improving battery life on the HP Mini

A few weeks ago I wrote about my experience using an HP Mini netbook - well in this follow up article describes how I reduced the power consumption on this device with some fairly basic steps.

I started from a fresh clean install of Ubuntu Karmic 9.10 (32 bit) and pulled in all the latest updates. I then installed powertop using:

apt-get install powertop

Then I unplugged the power and let powertop run for 10 minutes to settle in and then noted that ACPI power estimate was ~13.0W.

My first saving was to totally disable Bluetooth - wireless power savings are a good way of saving power. I don't use Bluetooth at all and to save memory from the driver being loaded I blacklisted the btusb module by adding btusb to /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf (this is rather a heavy handed approach!). I then rebooted and re-measured the power consumption - down to 9.7W.

My next tweak was to enable laptop mode. To do this, edit /etc/default/acpi-support and set ENABLE_LAPTOP_MODE=true. Not sure if this is a big win for devices with SSD like my netbook, I believe one will see a bigger power saving with HDD based devices using this setting.

I noted that powertop was informing me to use usbcore.autosuspend=1 and disable hal polling, so I'd thought I'd follow it's wisdom and make these tweaks.

I edited /etc/default/grub and changed the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT setting by adding usbcore.autosuspend=1, and then ran sudo update-grub to update /boot/grub/grub.cfg.

Next I ran:

sudo hal-disable-polling --device /dev/sdb

..for some reason /dev/sdb was being polled and I don't require this overhead for some auto sensing functionality.

I rebooted and remeasured the power consumption - down to 8.7W. Not bad.

Next I totally disabled compiz and turned my display brightness down - this saved 0.3W, bringing the the system down to a reasonable 8.4W. I'm not sure if the compiz savings were much, but if I can save the GPU work by turning off compositing then that must save some power.

My final tweak was to disable the Gnome terminal cursor from flashing - this saves 2 wakeups a second (not much!). To disable the cursor blink for the Default profile I ran gconf-editor and set /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default/cursor_blink_mode to off. This saving is negligible, but makes me feel good to know I've saved two wakeups a second :-)

So now my machine was in a usable state, and down to 8.4W. I could tweak my access point to reduce the number of beacon intervals to save Wifi wakeups, but that's going a little too far, even for me! I then wondered much power Wifi was using, so I disabled it and after 15 minutes my system dropped down to 7.3W. This is good to know but a little pointless for my normal work pattern when I need net access - it is a netbook after all!

I'm sure I can save a little more power, but for now it's a good win for a little amount of work. I'm open to any suggestions on how to save more power. Please let me know!


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Colin Ian King

Disabling Gnome Terminal Blinking Cursor

Looking at powertop, an idle Gnome Terminal is waking up around twice a second just to animate the blinking cursor. While this is a minimal amount of wake-ups a second, it still sucks power and also I find a blinky cursor a little annoying. To disable cursor blink for the Default profile run gconf-editor and set /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default/cursor_blink_mode to off.


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