Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'openstack'

Mark Baker

On Monday, Calxeda, one of the leading innovators bringing revolutionary efficiency to the datacenter, unveiled their new EnergyCore reference server live onstage with Mark Shuttleworth at the Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) in Oakland California.

 

Calxeda CTO and Founder Larry Wikelius with Mark Shuttleworth at UDS

The choice of UDS at the venue to unveil the new hardware to the world was flattering and underlines how the innovators in next generation computing are building out a compelling platform together. Ubuntu and Calxeda have been working together for several years to bring Ubuntu on Calxeda to market in the form now being shown at UDS. The collaboration of Canonical and the Ubuntu community with Calxeda has been vital to be able to deliver a solution that can very easily deploy OpenStack based cloud using MAAS and Juju on hardware that is so innovative.

The EnergyCore reference server unveiled at UDS can house up to 48 Quadcore nodes at under 300 Watts with up to 24 SATA drives. In this configuration it is possible to house 1000 server instances in a single rack and other server form factors being developed by OEMs may enable several times this volume. It is precisely this type of power efficient technology that will accelerate the adoption of next generation hyperscale services such as cloud and we are proud to be at the very core of it.

So congratulations to Calxeda on the arrival of the EnergyCore and congratulations to Canonical and the Ubuntu Community for providing the platform that will power it.

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Cezzaine Haigh

The first Ubuntu Cloud Summit, hosted by Canonical and Redmonk, takes place in Oakland, California on May 8th and the speakers are now confirmed. It promises to be a riveting day for anyone interested in cloud strategy. If you haven’t secured your ticket yet, there’s still time – but hurry. They are disappearing fast.

Presenting on the day will be:

- Mark Shuttleworth, Founder of Ubuntu

- Kyle MacDonald, Director of Cloud, Canonical

- Stephen O’Grady, Principal Analyst & Co-founder, RedMonk

- John Purrier, Vice President of Cloud Infrastructure, HP

- Randy Bias, CTO, CloudScaling

- Patrick Chanezon, Senior Director of Developer Relations, VMware

- Robbie Williamson, Director of Ubuntu Server Engineering, Canonical

The day will cover the role of open-source software in cloud computing, some lessons from real world cloud deployments and an examination of how the cloud technologies in Ubuntu – including OpenStack, MAAS and Juju – come together to form an open cloud.

We’d love the chance to meet you there. To find out more and to book your place, go to  http://uds.ubuntu.com/cloud-summit/

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Cezzaine Haigh

Canonical is proud to be one of the headline sponsors of the OpenStack Design Summit & Conference next week in San Francsico.

Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth will be presenting at the conference on April 19th. Mark’s presentation, From Blue Skies to Big Deployments, will outline how we can deliver the robustness, scale and innovation that will turn pilots and prototypes into mission critical infrastructure. Practices and processes that build quality, governance and innovation while preserving the flexibility and passion of contributors will be a focus, as will some of the lessons learned from large scale deployments of Ubuntu in government and corporate environments.

Canonical will also host a Juju Charm school on Thursday, April 19th from 5:30pm to 8:30pm in the Marina Room. Juju provides shareable, re-usable, and repeatable expressions of devops best practices in the form of charms. The school is for anyone who writes or deploys software in distributed environments. Though not required, we recommend that attendees have Juju installed and configured prior to the event. Places are available on a first come, first served basis. Pizza and drinks will be provided.

And if that’s not enough, a number of Canonical employees will be in attendance so you can be sure to have a chance to network during the Summit, or visit the Canonical demo area on Thursday and Friday to learn more about OpenStack deployments.

You can find out more about the event here.

See you there!

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Nick Barcet

Six month after starting a private beta for HPCloud, HP has announced this week that their cloud is ready to start scaling up to a public beta next month.  This is a major milestone for HPCloud which coincides with two major events: the release of OpenStack Essex last week and the upcoming release of Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS at the end of this month.  These two components are the foundation that HP uses to build its public cloud offering, on which they bring their own set of enhancements.

HPCloud is built on top of Ubuntu Server and uses the built in KVM hypervisor to power OpenStack compute nodes.  HP’s OpenStack deployment includes all core components of Essex, including the new central authentication, Keystone, which provides unified login for all components of OpenStack.

We are proud that Ubuntu and our support services are at the heart of this public cloud deployment which is one more proof point that Ubuntu and OpenStack are ready for business.

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Neil Levine

We made a small flurry of announcements last week, all of which were related to cloud computing. I think it is worthwhile to put some context around Ubuntu and the cloud and explain a little more about where we are with this critical strategic strand for our beloved OS.

First of all, the announcements. We announced the release of Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud on Dell servers. This is a hugely significant advance in the realm of internal cloud provision. It’s essentially formalising a lot of the bespoke work that Dell has done in huge data centres (based on a variety of OSes) and making similar technology available for smaller deployments. We attended the Dell sales summit in Las Vegas and we were very encouraged to meet with many of the Dell salespeople whose job it will be to deliver this to their customers. This is a big company, backing a leading technology and encouraging businesses to start their investigations of cloud computing in a very real way.

More or less simultaneously, we announced our formal support for the OpenStack project and the inclusion of their Bexar release in our next version of Ubuntu, 11.04. This will be in addition to Eucalyptus, it is worth stating. Eucalyptus is the technology at the core of UEC – and will be in Ubuntu 11.04 – as it has been since 9.04. Including two stacks has caused some raised eyebrows but it is not an unusual position for Ubuntu. While we look to pick one technology for integration into the platform in order to deliver the best user experience possible, we also want to make sure that users have access to the best and most up to date free and open-source software. The increasing speed of innovation that cloud computing is driving has meant that Ubuntu, with its 6 month release cadence, is able to deliver the tools and programs that developers and admins want before any other operating system.

Users will ultimately decide what deployment scenarios each stack best suits. Eucalyptus certainly has the advantage of maturity right now, especially for internal cloud deployments. OpenStack, meanwhile, continue to focus on rapid feature development and, given its heritage, has appeal to service providers looking to stand up their own public clouds. Wherever the technology is deployed, be it in the enterprise or for public clouds, we want Ubuntu to be the underlying infrastructure for all the scenarios and will continue to direct our platform team to deliver the most tightly integrated solution possible.

Finally we saw our partner Autonomic Resources announce UEC is now available for purchase by Federal US government buyers. This is the first step on a long road the federal deployment, as anyone familiar with the governmental buying cycles will realise. But it is a good example of the built-to-purpose cloud environments that we will see more of – with the common denominator of Ubuntu at the core of it.

Which actually raises an interesting question – why is it that Ubuntu is at the heart of cloud computing? Perhaps we ought to look at more evidence before the theory. In addition to being the OS at the heart of new cloud infrastructures, we are seeing enormous usage of Ubuntu as the guest OS on the big public clouds, such as AWS and Rackspace, for instance. It is probably the most popular OS on those environments and others – contact your vendor to confirm :-)

So why is this OS that most incumbent vendors would dismiss as fringe, seeing such popularity in this new(ish) wave of computing? Well there are a host of technical reasons to do with modularity, footprint, image maintenance etc. But they are better expressed by others.

I think the reason for Ubuntu’s prominence is because it is innovation made easy. Getting on and doing things on Ubuntu is a friction-free experience. We meet more and more tech entrepreneurs who tell us how they have built more than one business on Ubuntu on the cloud. Removing licence costs and restrictions allows people to get to the market quickly.

But beyond speed, it is also about reducing risk. With open-source now firmly established in the IT industry, and with the term open used so promiscuously, it is easy to forget that the economic benefits of truly free, open-source software. The combination of cloud computing, where scale matters, and open source is a natural one and this is why Ubuntu is the answer for those who need the reassurance that they can both scale quickly but also avoid vendor lock-in in the long-term.

More specifically, and this brings us back to the announcements, there are now clear scenarios where users can reach a point where even the economics of a licence-free software on a public cloud start to break down. At a certain stage it is simply cheaper to make the hardware investment to run your own cloud infrastructure. Or there might be regulatory, cultural or a host of other reasons for wanting cloud-like efficiencies built on internal servers.

The work we have done with OpenStack and with Eucalyptus means Ubuntu is an ideal infrastructure on which to build a cloud. This will typically be for the internal provision of a cloud environment but equally could be the basis or a new public cloud. It is entirely open as to the type of guest OS and in all cases continues to support the dominant API of Amazon EC2, ensuring portability for those writing applications.

And as we have seen, Ubuntu is the ultimate OS to deploy in a cloud and with which to build a cloud. No-one provides more up-to-date images on the most popular public cloud platforms. Our work to ensure compatibility to the most popular standards means that those guests will run just as well on a UEC cloud however that is deployed – either internally or for cloud provision externally.

So technology moves markets. Economics does too, only more so. Ubuntu has come at the right point in our short IT history to ride both waves. The scale is there, the standards are emerging and the ability to provide an answer to the choice between running a cloud or running on a cloud is more fully realised on Ubuntu than on any other OS – open source or not.

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