Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'cloud'

Mark Baker

On Monday, Calxeda, one of the leading innovators bringing revolutionary efficiency to the datacenter, unveiled their new EnergyCore reference server live onstage with Mark Shuttleworth at the Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) in Oakland California.

 

Calxeda CTO and Founder Larry Wikelius with Mark Shuttleworth at UDS

The choice of UDS at the venue to unveil the new hardware to the world was flattering and underlines how the innovators in next generation computing are building out a compelling platform together. Ubuntu and Calxeda have been working together for several years to bring Ubuntu on Calxeda to market in the form now being shown at UDS. The collaboration of Canonical and the Ubuntu community with Calxeda has been vital to be able to deliver a solution that can very easily deploy OpenStack based cloud using MAAS and Juju on hardware that is so innovative.

The EnergyCore reference server unveiled at UDS can house up to 48 Quadcore nodes at under 300 Watts with up to 24 SATA drives. In this configuration it is possible to house 1000 server instances in a single rack and other server form factors being developed by OEMs may enable several times this volume. It is precisely this type of power efficient technology that will accelerate the adoption of next generation hyperscale services such as cloud and we are proud to be at the very core of it.

So congratulations to Calxeda on the arrival of the EnergyCore and congratulations to Canonical and the Ubuntu Community for providing the platform that will power it.

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Jane Silber

Ubuntu 12.04 LTS will be released to the world this Thursday and it’s going to be fantastic. We’ve known for quite a while that Ubuntu is not only beautiful, but also usable and robust for individuals and a great platform for app developers. Those traditions continue in 12.04, with the added bonus of long term support (LTS) promise. This release will be our fourth LTS release, a significant milestone by itself, but it will also be the first in which we offer special consideration of hardware refresh cycles on the desktop and fast-moving technology developments in the cloud.

Ubuntu 12.04 LTS  is the ideal platform for organisations looking for more cost-effective alternatives to traditional desktop computing. As enterprise moves to cloud-based apps and lighter, more mobile clients, the argument for moving beyond a Windows-only environment has never been stronger. Ubuntu delivers an intuitive, responsive and above all, productive desktop experience at a fraction of the cost of its competitors.

Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS combines the world’s best open source server and cloud technologies with five years of hardware, security and maintenance updates, and of course the option of enterprise-grade commercial support. This combination of proven technologies, time-saving deployment tools and long-term support makes it a cost-effective platform for any workload from print and web serving to big data applications and the cloud.

With support guaranteed for five years, certification on a wide range of hardware and the option of enterprise-grade commercial services, Ubuntu is a proven, cost-effective enterprise platform that can be relied on for the long term for their desktop, server, and cloud needs.

On Thursday we expect to see the reliability, collaboration, freedom and yes, precision, that Ubuntu embodies delivered again, on time, and in style. I can’t wait.

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Cezzaine Haigh

The first Ubuntu Cloud Summit, hosted by Canonical and Redmonk, takes place in Oakland, California on May 8th and the speakers are now confirmed. It promises to be a riveting day for anyone interested in cloud strategy. If you haven’t secured your ticket yet, there’s still time – but hurry. They are disappearing fast.

Presenting on the day will be:

- Mark Shuttleworth, Founder of Ubuntu

- Kyle MacDonald, Director of Cloud, Canonical

- Stephen O’Grady, Principal Analyst & Co-founder, RedMonk

- John Purrier, Vice President of Cloud Infrastructure, HP

- Randy Bias, CTO, CloudScaling

- Patrick Chanezon, Senior Director of Developer Relations, VMware

- Robbie Williamson, Director of Ubuntu Server Engineering, Canonical

The day will cover the role of open-source software in cloud computing, some lessons from real world cloud deployments and an examination of how the cloud technologies in Ubuntu – including OpenStack, MAAS and Juju – come together to form an open cloud.

We’d love the chance to meet you there. To find out more and to book your place, go to  http://uds.ubuntu.com/cloud-summit/

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Mark Baker

Today, Canonical and HP announced that Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS is to be certified and supported by HP on its Proliant Systems:

http://www.canonical.com/content/ubuntu-1204-lts-server-be-certified-supported-hp-proliant-systems

This is a huge announcement for us at Canonical. It’s also testament that HP sees real business benefits in offering certified and supported Proliant systems with Ubuntu Server. Arguably, however, the most significant aspect of the announcement is the implication that the next generation of computing requires a different model.

Big data and cloud computing are at the forefront of a move towards hyperscale distributed systems. To meet these new challenges, today’s IT departments need a proven developer-led technology that’s free from licensing restrictions.

Ubuntu Server is that technology. That’s why it is now the platform of choice for Openstack clouds and the only commercially-supported Linux distribution to be increasing its share of the online infrastructure market. Even on Amazon Web Services, Ubuntu Server reigns supreme – thanks to its technological and commercial advantages over other platforms.

HP has been working with Canonical for several years now and in that time, it has grown to understand where we sit in the IT ecosystem. The resulting announcement of support for Ubuntu on Proliant (alongside other Linux platforms) is a signal to organisations of all kinds that the IT landscape is changing.

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Cezzaine Haigh

Canonical is proud to be one of the headline sponsors of the OpenStack Design Summit & Conference next week in San Francsico.

Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth will be presenting at the conference on April 19th. Mark’s presentation, From Blue Skies to Big Deployments, will outline how we can deliver the robustness, scale and innovation that will turn pilots and prototypes into mission critical infrastructure. Practices and processes that build quality, governance and innovation while preserving the flexibility and passion of contributors will be a focus, as will some of the lessons learned from large scale deployments of Ubuntu in government and corporate environments.

Canonical will also host a Juju Charm school on Thursday, April 19th from 5:30pm to 8:30pm in the Marina Room. Juju provides shareable, re-usable, and repeatable expressions of devops best practices in the form of charms. The school is for anyone who writes or deploys software in distributed environments. Though not required, we recommend that attendees have Juju installed and configured prior to the event. Places are available on a first come, first served basis. Pizza and drinks will be provided.

And if that’s not enough, a number of Canonical employees will be in attendance so you can be sure to have a chance to network during the Summit, or visit the Canonical demo area on Thursday and Friday to learn more about OpenStack deployments.

You can find out more about the event here.

See you there!

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Nick Barcet

Six month after starting a private beta for HPCloud, HP has announced this week that their cloud is ready to start scaling up to a public beta next month.  This is a major milestone for HPCloud which coincides with two major events: the release of OpenStack Essex last week and the upcoming release of Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS at the end of this month.  These two components are the foundation that HP uses to build its public cloud offering, on which they bring their own set of enhancements.

HPCloud is built on top of Ubuntu Server and uses the built in KVM hypervisor to power OpenStack compute nodes.  HP’s OpenStack deployment includes all core components of Essex, including the new central authentication, Keystone, which provides unified login for all components of OpenStack.

We are proud that Ubuntu and our support services are at the heart of this public cloud deployment which is one more proof point that Ubuntu and OpenStack are ready for business.

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Cezzaine Haigh

Kicking off this May, the Ubuntu Cloud Summit is a one day event for both technology and business people interested in what cloud computing can do for their organisations.

Hosted by Canonical and Redmonk we’ll be looking at how open-source is playing a critical role in the move to cloud computing. Delegates will also hear how enterprises have made the most of the move to the cloud using open source. There will be plenty of opportunity for discussion and debate ensuring you have all the information you need to deploy an open cloud.

The day will include a keynote from Mark Shuttleworth and others, plus a panel discussion chaired by Stephen O’Grady of Redmonk, before closing with cocktails and canapes.

The Ubuntu Cloud Summit takes place on Tuesday 8th May, at the The Oakland Marriott City Center in Oakland.

The event is sure to be popular, so don’t miss your chance to be there.

To find out more, go to  uds.ubuntu.com/cloud-summit/

Hope to see you there!

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Martin Stadtler

At World Hosting Day in Germany today, Dell announced its partnering with Canonical to deliver and support Dell OpenStack-Powered Cloud Solution with Ubuntu in the UK, Germany and China. This is a great opportunity for enterprise customers who want to deploy their own private clouds with the same features and capabilities as public clouds. So whether you are considering, actively planning or in the process of deploying an internal open cloud, you can count on Canonical and Dell for support in your work.

 

We know that when you’re building private clouds, you want access to a full feature set and the confidence that vendor support provides. With Dell’s OpenStack-Powered Cloud Solution, users of Ubuntu Server 12.04 Long Term Support (LTS) will be able to take advantage of the cost savings and flexibility of the open-source cloud, without the risk.

Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS is being built with the latest Linux and OpenStack technologies. Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS is undergoing rigorous integration and quality assurance testing with OpenStack. So a Dell OpenStack Cloud customer can deploy the best open source technologies with confidence.

At Canonical, we have extensive consulting and deployment expertise on our global engagement teams. We have more than two years’ experience of bringing up, deploying and supporting mission critical private clouds. In fact, most major public Openstack clouds are built on Ubuntu – for the simple reason that Ubuntu and OpenStack were built to work together.

Dell OpenStack Cloud users can rely on enterprise grade support of their private clouds with the Canonical Ubuntu Advantage support offering. Ubuntu Advantage provides users with global support, 24/7 coverage for their production cloud environments.

With Ubuntu Advantage, you can now have your cake and eat it too, with the latest Dell Data Center Solutions, Ubuntu and OpenStack technologies, deployment expertise and enterprise support options.

You can find more information about Ubuntu Advantage for Dell OpenStack-Powered Cloud Solution on the Canonical and Dell websites. Important announcements about Ubuntu Advantage for Cloud are made on the low traffic Ubuntu Cloud announce mailing list as well as on Twitter @UbuntuCloud, #WHD_global and #Dell

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John Bernard

Ubuntu Cloud Day is Canonical’s first Cloud event in Bangalore. With keynote speeches from various members of the Canonical team and a more focussed technical delivery, the event is aimed at engineers and developers with a professional interest in using Ubuntu Cloud as a developer tool, along with those with a keen interest in developing innovative applications for the Ubuntu user base.

The event is sponsored by Intel and the agenda includes presentations on working with Ubuntu Cloud, JuJu, Cloud infrastructure, as well as presentations from Intel and other partners. The sessions will also cover the intricacies of building your own Cloud infrastructure with Ubuntu, managing Cloud workloads on your own servers and sending identical workloads to the public Cloud when you need extra capacity.

The location for Ubuntu Cloud Day is the Grand Ballroom at the Chancery Pavilion Hotel, 135 Residency Road, Bangalore.

There is a fee to participate, of INR 999.00. Registrations are restricted, so secure your place at http://www.ubuntucloudday.in

Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

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Nick Barcet

We’re pleased to announce that official Ubuntu Cloud Guest Images are now listed on the Amazon EC2 quick start. Users can now find and launch official Ubuntu Cloud Guest Images right from the Amazon EC2 management console. This significantly simplifies access to Ubuntu on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and provides users with more options for support and services to build and deploy cloud applications on a reliable guest operating system.

Official Ubuntu images from Canonical give users the assurance that they are getting certified, up-to-date images with the option for full commercial support, legal assurance and systems management capabilities (through Ubuntu Advantage). As more companies shift their computing infrastructure to the cloud, it is important that their servers be supported, managed and kept up to date with critical security patches in the same manner as on-premise systems. Official images provide assurance that you have the same feature and support lifecycle whether you are deploying Ubuntu in the cloud, in your data center or in hybrid style deployments.

Canonical provides a number of tailored options for commercial support for Ubuntu including Ubuntu Advantage. Ubuntu Advantage provides support to deploy, manage and monitor a production environment while offering significant operational and cost savings. Ubuntu Advantage also includes the Landscape systems management tool for managing cloud and on-premise based Ubuntu servers from a single console, lowering your management and administrative cost in the cloud.

You can find more information about support offerings for Amazon Web Services on the Canonical web site.

Important announcements about Ubuntu Cloud Guest are made on the low traffic Ubuntu Cloud announce mailing list as well as on Twitter @UbuntuCloud.

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Sonia Ouarti

The future of enterprise cloud computing remains uncertain. But if you’re thinking about the best way to make it happen in your organisation, our latest guide is for you.This new, free ebook will show you why Ubuntu is the ideal platform for the enterprise cloud. It takes a look at six technology-driven scenarios that may not be affecting your business today, but almost certainly will be soon.

Download it today and discover how Ubuntu can help you successfully cope with:

  • The acceleration of everything
  • Switching between clouds
  • Unsustainable power consumption
  • The hidden costs of virtual image sprawl
  • (More) global economic turmoil
  • Ops and dev teams working closer together

Just hit the button below to find out what’s round the corner.

 

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Gerry Carr

The Ubuntu Server Survey is finally ready to be published it makes for a fascinating read. It is the third survey of its kind and again it has been an overwhelming response with over 6,000 completed surveys throughout 2011 and a heartfelt thanks to all who took the time to complete the comprehensive survey.

The overwhelming impression is the widespread use of Ubuntu both geographically as you might expect with respondents from across the globe. but also in the broad range of workloads in which Ubuntu Server finds itself used. Every category from web and data servers to cloud shows up strongly albeit with a strong bias towards traditional workloads.

As we approach an LTS, again we see evidence of the popularity of the extended support releases. Given we have run this survey three times now over the past three years now we begin to see strong evidence of the switching from one LTS to the next, particularly as the deployment platform, so our user base is certainly staying with us as as we introduce new features and support them in the long term.

Virtualization and cloud are now key elements of Ubuntu use, and for the first time we see KVM overtake Xen as the preferred virtualization technology for Ubuntu users, significant as the platform was the first to make the switch to supporting KVM as the native technology. With that though, VMWare remains the most cited virtualization technology showing a healthy mixture of open source and other technologies at use in the Ubuntu user base.

The respondents consideration of cloud makes for interesting reading too. There is significant interest but the use of Ubuntu Server on bare metal remains the primary use case for most users today. There is strong recognition though of the emergence of this powerful technology and with the plans for ease of installation and orchestration in 12.04 LTS it will be interesting to see how this moves the dial in regards to uptake in the Ubuntu base. A deeper analysis  shows a bias towards larger companies (i.e. respondents with more servers) using cloud technologies which is to be expected and overwhelmingly there is recognition of the suitability of Ubuntu Cloud as a basis for those efforts.

Enjoy the full report, it would be very interesting to hear your comments.

 

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John Bernard

Canonical will have a presence at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, from the 10th – 13th January. The booth, in the Upper Level of South Hall 4, is at location 35379 within the Las Vegas Convention Center.

On display will be the latest in Desktop, Cloud and demonstrations on Ubuntu One, plus an exclusive Ubuntu concept design which will be announced during the show.

Find out more by coming to visit us at CES and see why Ubuntu is the primary computing environment on millions of desktops around the world and used by thousands of businesses. You can also discover how Canonical supports a rapidly increasing number of manufacturers pre-installing Ubuntu on their hardware.

To set up a meeting at the show and discuss Ubuntu, now the world’s third largest Desktop Operating System, email sales@canonical.com.

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John Bernard

Last week saw the third annual Ubuntu Hardware Summit (UHS) taking place in Taipei. With over two hundred attendees present, the show is fast becoming one of the must-attend events within the software, ODM and OEM environments across Taiwan.

With standing room only at the back of the room during the Keynote speech, Canonical set the scene for the next two years including the growth of Ubuntu, the multitude of device enablement and an insight into Ubuntu Cloud and Ubuntu Server. After the Keynote, UHS then went into break-out Tracks which included topics on Ubuntu Cloud, Thin Client solutions, hardware enablement and Ubuntu System Architecture.

You can find all presentations from the day at odm.ubuntu.com and clicking the link ‘Download material’.

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Sonia Ouarti

Juju is Devops Distilled

Cloud deployment is different. It involves tighter devops handovers, the ability to scale services both up and down, and hybrid cloud computing: moving services between your private cloud and multiple public cloud providers.

Accelerated provisioning through IAAS has put the spotlight on friction in the deployment, configuration and management of services. This friction can only be overcome via a change in emphasis, from configuring machines to connecting services that can then be scaled independently. In other words, service orchestration.


With Juju, services can be deployed, connected, upgraded and re-used by defining them as Juju charms. Encapsulating service intelligence in charms enables you to separate deep service-specific skills from broad operations management skills.

This webinar, jointly presented by Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth and Clint Byrum, a devops expert, will cover cloud deployment and devops with Juju.

 

Register Now!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Gerry Carr

The Ubuntu Developer Summit – UDS – is a major event in the Canonical calendar. Taking place every six months, it is the Ubuntu event which defines the focus and plans for our up-coming version of Ubuntu. In the first week of November, over 800 people, from Canonical engineers and employees, Ubuntu community members, partners, ISVs, upstreams and many more gathered to discuss and plan for the upcoming Ubuntu 12.04, code-named Precise Pangolin.

UDS covered 420 sessions, under nine tacks, from desktop to design, community to server and cloud. Attendees worked in the usual collaborative and open environment and spent the week pooling their experience and expertise and sharing best practise resulting, as always, in the very best ideas. Right now, those ideas are are represented in hundreds of blueprint documents and are being put into action by developers, community and Canonical, who are already driving forward for April’s launch. As a practical demonstration of that openness you can track our progress here (note, it’s early days!): http://status.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-precise/.

Focus on desktop and the cloud

Over the coming months, we’ll see much more of the fruits of UDS’ labour as new features are developed and collaborations and partnerships formed. Right now, the focus is on refinement, quality and stabilisation. As Ubuntu 12.04 will be a LTS release, which, for the first time, will be supported for five years, getting performance and stability right will be extremely important. For businesses, cloud is becoming ever more important, so we’ll be looking at building out a robust test infrastructure; there will be continued support for the latest releases of OpenStack and much effort will be put into improving Juju and developing the Charms collection.

For our desktop users, refinement of the interface is a continued focus and we’ll regularly run usability testing to make sure Ubuntu looks and feels great. For ubuntu 12.04, there will be a lot of developments for power users, including multi-monitor support, and improvements to boot speed, text-free boot and power consumption. And of course, the community centres around the developer programme, design, governance and loco teams. Engaging and embracing developers continues to be important (for free software) as we seek to bring new and exciting applications to the Ubuntu platform.

Our wonderful sponsors

We also wanted to take this opportunity to extend a special thank you to all of our sponsors who helped us accomplish this monumental task. Cloud Foundry, Rackspace, Google, System 76, Freescale, Nebula, as well as our media partners, Ubuntu User, Linux Pro Magazine, all attended and contributed to the success of UDS in different ways. Some gave plenary sessions;
Brian Thomason and Juan Negron – Cloudfoundry Server deployments using Juju
James Blair and Monty Taylor – Rackspace – Distributed QA in the OpenStack Project

It’s Linaro’s summit too

Also, for the second time, UDS was co-hosted with the Linaro Connect event, where the best software developers met to plan out and code the future of Linux on ARM. Canonical has been actively participating in the Linaro project since it began in 2010, and having both events run in parallel is a good opportunity to share new ideas and collaborate. ARM continues to gain more traction in traditional PC areas, such as the data center and Ubuntu continues to contribute to the enablement of ARM. You can hear more from David Brash’s Linaro plenary, An ARM Technology Update.

And a vision for what’s next

While the focus for Canonical and the Ubuntu community is firmly on the next launch , we’ve already started to think beyond this release. In Mark’s opening keynote, he talked of extending the Ubuntu mission; “‘Linux for Human Beings’ cannot end at the desktop, but needs to take into account the devices that will be used by human beings in the years to come….”. In the coming two years, we’ll start to see Ubuntu powering tablets, phones, TVs and smart screens from the car to the office kitchen, and it will connect those devices cleanly and seamlessly to the desktop, the server and the cloud. You can read more on Mark’s vision for the future of Ubuntu on his blog: or see the full keynote.

For lots more video and insight you can check out the excellent Ubuntu Developers Channel on YouTube

So, roll on Ubuntu 12.04!

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John Bernard

This year’s Ubuntu Hardware Summit (UHS) will take place on December 8th at the Grand Victoria Hotel in Taipei. You can register your place at www.ubuntu.com.uhs

Building on the success of 2010 (with over 200 attendees), the 2011 Ubuntu Hardware Summit promises to deliver more. With keynote speeches from various members of the Canonical team and a more focused technical delivery, UHS is created especially for product managers and engineers at ODMs and OEMs, with interest or responsibility in deploying Ubuntu on new computers and devices.

Highlights will include presentations on Ubuntu Server, deploying Ubuntu Cloud, QA, power management, hardware enablement….and much more! Details of the event can also be found on the new Ubuntu Hardware Debugging website at http://odm.ubuntu.com/portal/

UHS is sponsored by Canonical and free of charge.

To reserve your space, visit www.ubuntu.com/uhs today as registrations will close on 29th November 2011.

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Chris Kenyon

HP logo

 

Today HP announced Project Moonshot  - a programme to accelerate the use of low power processors in the data centre.

The three elements of the announcement are the launch of Redstone – a development platform that harnesses low-power processors (both ARM & x86),  the opening of the HP Discovery lab in Houston and the Pathfinder partnership programme.

Canonical is delighted to be involved in all three elements of HP’s Moonshot programme to reduce both power and complexity in data centres.

The HP Redstone platform unveiled in Palo Alto showcases HP’s thinking around highly federated environments and Calxeda’s EnergyCore ARM processors. The Calxeda system on chip (SoC) design is powered by Calxeda’s own ARM based processor and combines mobile phone like power consumption with the attributes required to run a tangible proportion of hyperscale data centre workloads.

HP Redstone Platform

The promise of server grade SoC’s running at less than 5W and achieving per rack density of 2800+ nodes is impressive, but what about the software stacks that are used to run the web and analyse big data – when will they be ready for this new architecture?

Ubuntu Server is increasingly the operating system of choice for web, big data and cloud infrastructure workloads. Films like Avatar are rendered on Ubuntu, Hadoop is run on it and companies like Rackspace and HP are using Ubuntu Server as the foundation of their public cloud offerings.

The good news is that Canonical has been working with ARM and Calexda for several years now and we released the first version of Ubuntu Server ported for ARM Cortex A9 class  processors last month.

The Ubuntu 11.10 release (download) is an functioning port and over the next six months and we will be working hard to benchmark and optimize Ubuntu Server and the workloads that our users prioritize on ARM.  This work, by us and by upstream open source projects is going to be accelerated by today’s announcement and access to hardware in the HP Discovery lab.

As HP stated today, this is beginning of a journey to re-inventing a power efficient and less complex data center. We look forward to working with HP and Calxeda on that journey.

 

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Sonia Ouarti

November 16th – 2pm UK time

After years of development and fine tuning, the cloud vision of true computing elasticity is finally a reality. The question now is how organisations can best take advantage of the latest cloud technologies to optimise their IT, scale infrastructure and services in near-real time, and make the most of new market opportunities.

In our webinar, Ubuntu’s Founder Mark Shuttleworth and Redmonk’s Stephen O’Grady share their ideas on the cloud and the benefits it offers businesses today. They discuss how open-source technologies in general, and Ubuntu Cloud in particular, can help companies avoid frustrating vendor lock-in and stay in control of their own cloud destinies. They also explore Ubuntu’s unique attributes, looking at how it minimises hardware and software costs, accelerates cloud deployment, and supports dynamic service provisioning and scaling.

Register now: http://www.brighttalk.com/channel/6793

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Paul Oh

Great news that Ubuntu 11.10 will include Cloud Foundry, an open source Platform as a Service (PaaS) that enables developers to build, deploy and run Cloud applications. Other PaaS offerings have typically locked you into using specific frameworks and services defined by the PaaS vendor as well as proprietary host platforms. This has made migrating applications between different providers as well as moving applications back into your own data center difficult if not impossible.

Cloud Foundry is the world’s first Open PaaS with your choice of frameworks, application services and Cloud deployment platforms. Cloud Foundry is made to be extensible so that while Spring, Rails, Sinatra and Node.js apps are supported today more frameworks can be added in the future as they gain in popularity. Even more exciting is that you will be able to run your PaaS in any cloud or behind your own firewall if you choose. No lock-in to a single development framework or Cloud vendor!

In Ubuntu 11.10 we’ve added client and server deployment tools using Ensemble that allow you to easily deploy a single node server in minutes as well as a distributed, multi node environment quickly and easily to create a production quality PaaS. You can deploy applications in AWS, Openstack or on your own internal servers.

Stay tuned as we’ll be doing more exciting work with Cloud Foundry. We encourage you to check out Cloud Foundry in Ubuntu 11.10 and learn more about the project at www.cloudfoundry.org

Cloud Foundry Community Logo

 

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