Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'certification'

David Duffey

Today we announced a collaborative support and engineering agreement with Dell.  As part of this agreement Canonical will add Dell 11G & 12G PowerEdge models to the Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS Certification List and Dell will add Ubuntu Server to its Linux OS Support Matrix.

In May 2012, Dell launched the OpenStack Cloud Reference Architecture using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on select PowerEdge-C series servers. Today’s announcement expands upon that offering by combining the benefits of Ubuntu Server Certification, Ubuntu Advantage enterprise support, and Dell Hardware ProSupport across the PowerEdge line.

Dell customers can now deploy with confidence when purchasing Dell PowerEdge servers with Dell Hardware ProSupport and Ubuntu Advantage.  When these customers call into Dell, their service tag numbers will be entitled with ProSupport and Ubuntu Advantage, which will create a seamless support experience via the collaborative Dell and Canonical support and engineering relationship.

In preparation for this announcement, Canonical engineers worked with Dell to enable and validate Ubuntu Server running on Dell PowerEdge Servers.  This work resulted in improved Ubuntu Server on Dell PowerEdge support for PCIe SSD (solid state drives), 4K-block drives, EFI booting, Web Services Management, consistent network device naming, and PERC (PowerEdge RAID Controllers).

Dell hardware systems management can be done out-of-band via ipmi, iDRAC, and the Lifecycle Controller.  Dell OMSA Ubuntu packages are also available but it is recommended to use the supported out-of-band systems management tools.  Dell TechCenter is a good resource for additional technical information about running Ubuntu Server on Dell PowerEdge servers.

If you are interested in purchasing Ubuntu Advantage for your Dell PowerEdge servers, please contact the Dell Solutions team at Canonical.  If your business is already using or thinking about using a supported Ubuntu Server infrastructure in your data-center then be sure to fill out the annual Ubuntu Server and Cloud Survey to provide additional feedback.

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Victor Tuson Palau

Canonical runs the Ubuntu Certification program, providing users with a verified list of Ubuntu compatible systems. For Manufacturers and partners that would like to understand better the certification program, Canonical publishes a guide available to download from the certification website.

We have recently updated the guide to include a detailed list of the components that will be tested for Oneiric. Each test listed on the guide is required for certification only if the system supports the functionality. For example, we do not run the bluetooth tests on a laptop that does not list bluetooth on its manufacturer specifications.

The list also contains tests that are run for informational proposes. This means that the result of those tests will be shared with the users but they will not determine if the system will pass or fail certification.

As usual, please let me know if you have any questions via launchpad answers.

 

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Victor Tuson Palau

What do Chianti wines, Organic foods, and Spanish Ham have in common with Ubuntu Certified? The simple answer is that they all stand for quality.

Chianti is an Italian standard (DOCG) for Tuscany wines that requires using defined methods, satisfying set quality standards.

Organic Foods are foods free of artificial components such as synthetic pesticides and chemical fertilizers. These need to comply with standards set by national governments and international organizations.

Jamon de Huelva is a Spanish Protected Designation of Origin introduced to avoid “misleading of consumers by non-genuine products,which may be of inferior quality or of different flavour.”
Ubuntu Certified is granted to computer systems (desktop, laptop, netbook, server,..) that satisfy set quality standards for an Ubuntu release by using defined production methods.

“Ubuntu Certified” Quality Standards
Great user experience is not a one-off, it is an ongoing affair. The Ubuntu Certification program is committed to sustained quality. We test the certified machines at the start of the program and we continue to test in order to stop problems from being introduced via software updates or new releases.

Manufacturers such as Dell and Lenovo engage Canonical OEM Services to enable Ubuntu for their systems. Through this work, we have developed an in-depth knowledge of the most complex areas for hardware compatibility. Certification testing pays special attention to these areas.

“Ubuntu Certified” Production Methods
Certification is only issued if the quality standards are met on:

  • An unmodified image available from Ubuntu.com. Only modifications accepted as exceptions are those than can be done through a user interface option or tool. This exclude command line changes.
  • A Manufacturer Pre-installed Ubuntu image, as part of a Canonical engagement. This ensures any modifications done by the manufacturer are compatible with future Ubuntu updates.

Canonical works with manufacturers participating in the program to maintain labs with representative hardware located around the world. This allow us to find possible regressions earlier on.

We hope that you continue to enjoy your “Ubuntu Certified” system. If you have any questions don’t hesitate to contact us via Launchpad Answers.

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Victor Tuson Palau

Canonical offers a commercial certification programme where manufacturers (OEM & ODM) can apply for their systems to be validated and endorsed to work with Ubuntu.  We had two levels of endorsement for systems: “Ubuntu Certified” and “Ubuntu Ready”. Successful applications to the certification programme results in a certificate for the system being listed at Ubuntu.com/Certification

“Ubuntu Certified” is an endorsement by Canonical over the lifetime of an Ubuntu release, this includes ongoing validation of Security and Stable Release Updates for the certified system.”Ubuntu Ready” is an endorsement by Canonical at a specific point in time of an Ubuntu release and provides no re-assurance over future release updates.

Are you confused yet? We recognise that the differences between these endorsement levels is quite granular and perhaps not obvious to consumers. In order to simply things, we are planning to close down the “Ubuntu Ready” programme in time for Ubuntu 11.10 release in October.

The take away of the changes is that from 11.10 there will only be one Canonical-endorsed certification programme:“Ubuntu Certified“.

If you are familiar with the Ubuntu Ready programme, you might be asking yourself:

What will happen with the existing “Ubuntu Ready” Certificates?

We will no longer be offering new “Ubuntu Ready” services to OEMs or ODMS. Cutomers with existing “Ubuntu Ready” tokens will still be able to redeem them for 11.04. The existing Ubuntu Ready certificates will be maintained on the public website until the applicable releases reach end of life.

“Ubuntu Ready” came with a set of  testing tools that allowed manufacturers to check if their systems worked with Ubuntu. Are these tools being removed too?
We will continue to offer testing tools to partners and the community. The objective is to have a single test tool for partners and the Ubuntu community that will be available within the standard Ubuntu image (from Ubuntu 11.10).

“Ubuntu Ready” did not require a manufacturer to provide Canonical with System samples. Does “Ubuntu Certified” have hardware requirements?

Ubuntu Certified will continue to require hardware to be submitted to Canonical by manufacturers for testing. Ubuntu fortnightly Stable Release Updates (SRUs) means that certified systems are required to be tested every two weeks to ensure no regressions are introduced. Ubuntu Certification testing can be used by partners as a way to assess if certification will be successful before engaging in a contract with Canonical.

Can a system be certified with a customised Ubuntu image?

An OEM or ODM shipping a pre-install custom ISO with their systems can apply for Ubuntu Certified if it is an approved Canonical image. These systems are clearly labelled as only certified if Ubuntu is supplied by the manufacturer at purchase time.

Any other questions?

I am sure we have left something out that might be in the back of your  mind, so please tell us!

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