Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'canonical'

David Duffey

Today we announced a collaborative support and engineering agreement with Dell.  As part of this agreement Canonical will add Dell 11G & 12G PowerEdge models to the Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS Certification List and Dell will add Ubuntu Server to its Linux OS Support Matrix.

In May 2012, Dell launched the OpenStack Cloud Reference Architecture using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on select PowerEdge-C series servers. Today’s announcement expands upon that offering by combining the benefits of Ubuntu Server Certification, Ubuntu Advantage enterprise support, and Dell Hardware ProSupport across the PowerEdge line.

Dell customers can now deploy with confidence when purchasing Dell PowerEdge servers with Dell Hardware ProSupport and Ubuntu Advantage.  When these customers call into Dell, their service tag numbers will be entitled with ProSupport and Ubuntu Advantage, which will create a seamless support experience via the collaborative Dell and Canonical support and engineering relationship.

In preparation for this announcement, Canonical engineers worked with Dell to enable and validate Ubuntu Server running on Dell PowerEdge Servers.  This work resulted in improved Ubuntu Server on Dell PowerEdge support for PCIe SSD (solid state drives), 4K-block drives, EFI booting, Web Services Management, consistent network device naming, and PERC (PowerEdge RAID Controllers).

Dell hardware systems management can be done out-of-band via ipmi, iDRAC, and the Lifecycle Controller.  Dell OMSA Ubuntu packages are also available but it is recommended to use the supported out-of-band systems management tools.  Dell TechCenter is a good resource for additional technical information about running Ubuntu Server on Dell PowerEdge servers.

If you are interested in purchasing Ubuntu Advantage for your Dell PowerEdge servers, please contact the Dell Solutions team at Canonical.  If your business is already using or thinking about using a supported Ubuntu Server infrastructure in your data-center then be sure to fill out the annual Ubuntu Server and Cloud Survey to provide additional feedback.

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anthony-c-beckley

We are exhibiting at this year’s CeBIT event on March 5-9th, 2013 in Hannover Germany, in conjunction with our partner in the region, Teuto.net and we’re giving away number of free tickets to selected customers and partners. If you are interested in one of these tickets, please contact me at anthony.beckley@canonical.com for more information.

The Canonical/Teuto.net stand will be in the Open Source Arena (Hall 6, Stand F16, (030) and we will be showcasing two enterprise technology areas:

  • The Ubuntu Cloud Stack – demonstrating end user access to applications via an OpenStack cloud, powered by Ubuntu,
  • Ubuntu Landscape Systems Management – demonstrating ease of management of desktop, server and cloud nodes.

We will be running hourly demonstrations on our stand and attendees have the chance to win a Google Nexus 7 tablet! Simply come to out stand and watch a short demo or your chance to win If you would like to pre-register for a demonstration, email me at anthony.beckley@canonical.com

We look forward to seeing you at the show!

CeBIT draws a live audience of more than 3,000 people from over 100 different countries. In just five days the show delivers a panoramic view of the digital world’s mainstay markets: ICT and Telecommunications, Digital Media also Consumer Electronics.
To learn more about CeBIT click here.

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Cristian Parrino

The Ubuntu 12.10 release saw the Dash take another important step towards fulfilling its intended purpose of being an online, global search tool that helps users find anything, instantly, right from their home environment. There are a number of exciting improvements planned for 13.04 that will make the Dash more comprehensive, more online and as a result – slicker and even more useful. Here’s a snapshot of what is likely to land in the next release:

Smart Scopes – Scopes are the daemons capable of presenting local or remote information right in the Dash. In 13.04, we will increase the number of scopes installed by default in Ubuntu (including many existing community developed scopes) and introduce the ability to automatically light up the right ones based on their relevancy to a user’s search query. For example, a search for “The Beatles” is likely to trigger the Music and Video scopes, showing results that will contain local and online sources – with the online sources querying your personal cloud as well as other free and commercial sources like YouTube, Last.fm, Amazon, etc. To achieve this, the Dash will call a new smart scope service which will return ranked online search results, which the Dash will then balance against local results to return the most relevant information to the user. Scopes are becoming a really interesting contribution area for our developer community – and we can’t wait to see what people will submit to make the Dash an even richer experience.

Instant Purchasing – being able to purchase music or apps directly from the Dash, without opening a browser or a separate client. In 13.04, we expect to enable instant payments, powered by Ubuntu One, for both applications from the Software Center and music from the Music Store – to deliver the fastest possible purchasing experience directly from the Dash.

More Suggestions and User Controls – the More Suggestions scope, which currently returns relevant commercial content available from the Ubuntu One Music Store and Amazon, will expand to include more retailers. We are also testing a few additional user controls like filters for local and global searching – more to come on this front as we learn from those sessions. In the meantime, users can already focus a search to local files only with a simple super-f keystroke.

There are several principles around the Dash that are also worth reiterating:

Its raison d’etre is to provide Ubuntu users the fastest, slickest way to find things right from their home environment – independent of whether those “things” are on your machine, available online, free or commercial.  The music and video lenses in the Dash have queried online sources since their introduction, and we will continue to expand our online sources over the next releases. Our testing has overwhelmingly shown that this integrated and unified search feature is the best experience for the vast majority of users – and the best user experience will always be included as a default on Ubuntu.

 
Privacy is extremely important to Canonical. The data we collect is not user-identifiable (we automatically anonymize user logs and that information is never available to the teams delivering services to end users), we make users aware of what data will be collected and which third party services will be queried through a notice right in the Dash, and we only collect data that allows us to deliver a great search experience to Ubuntu users.  We also recognize that there is always a minority of users who prefer complete data protection, often choosing to avoid services like Google, Facebook or Twitter for those reasons – and for those users, we have made it dead easy to switch the online search tools off with a simple toggle in settings.

Onwards and upwards.

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Sonia Ouarti

You have critical decisions ahead as you take your first steps into cloud computing.

One of them will be whether to build a private cloud infrastructure in your own data centre, make use of one of the public cloud services offered by vendors like Amazon, Rackspace and HP, or combine the two in a ‘hybrid cloud’ approach.

You can get closer to the right decision by considering the right questions now:

  • Budget - How much do you have (or how much don’t you have) to support your cloud strategy?
  • Speed - When do you need this done? Tomorrow, next year, yesterday…
  • Demand - How many users will you need to support? And will they call come at once?
  • Resources - What kind of resources do you have in-house? And how many can you realistically get your hands on?
  • Privacy -How sensitive is your data? Where are you doing business?

This short, sharp checklist takes you through the process that points you in the right direction and ensures your investments pay off from the start. Download it today.

 

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David Pitkin


UPDATE: We’ve just added four more amazing titles to the Humble Indie Bundle 6! If you’ve already picked up a bundle, you’ll find BIT.TRIP RUNNER, Gratuitous Space Battles, Jamestown, and Wizorb available now if you beat the average. This brings the bundle to ten games strong!

Humble Indie Bundle 6 is upon us – and every single game makes its Ubuntu debut this time around. Humble Bundle veterans will know the drill by now, but if this is your first time, prepare to be amazed. For the next two weeks, you can pay what you want to for the following incredible new titles on Ubuntu:

- Torchlight, the critically acclaimed action-RPG

- Shatter, the physics-based brick breaker

- Space Pirates & Zombies, the top down space combat sim

- Rochard, the rugged sci-fi action platformer

- Vessel*, the steampunk puzzle platformer

It gets better. If your donation is higher than the average, you’ll be rewarded with a sixth game download: the frantic acrobatic platformer Dustforce! *Please note that the finishing touches for Vessel’s Ubuntu debut are still being completed and should be ready in 24-72 hours.

There’s something extra special about Rochard because it’s the first native game based on the Unity engine to make it into both the Humble Bundle and the Ubuntu Software Center. The team at Unity is dedicated to their mission to democratize gaming, while strengthening their cross-platform gaming platform with the ability to export to Ubuntu.

With the Unity 4.0 release later this year, we can expect a raft of new games on Ubuntu. So it gives us great pleasure to welcome all Unity developers to what is easily the most enthusiastic indie gaming community.

To make life easier for independent game developers, we’ve been working hard to streamline the process of bringing new games to Ubuntu. Canonical has been developing a new service as part of our developer program to automatically package your applications – and that includes Unity games. This means developers can focus on their software, while Canonical takes care of the packaging for Ubuntu.

To learn even more about the games, check out the Humble Bundle site, where you’ll also find information about soundtracks, redemption through both the Ubuntu Software Center and Steam and donations to this bundle’s chosen charities: Child’s Play and the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

You have two weeks from now to get six brand new games for whatever price you think they’re worth. So lets make this bundle even bigger than the last one for Ubuntu – and the coming wave of gaming titles that continue to make Ubuntu great.

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Mark Murphy

Back in October 2011 we launched a joint initiative with Dell in China to sell machines pre-loaded with Ubuntu through their retail stores. The stores featured Ubuntu on a wide range of Dell computers, carried Ubuntu branded marketing collateral in-store, had trained staff positioning the benefits and advantages of Ubuntu to consumers and were supported by a retail team of Ubuntu merchandisers, set up to support those stores.

Ambitiously kicking off with a goal of 220 stores, the response has been phenomenal – and we’re delighted to confirm that we’ll be expanding the number of stores in China to 350 and beyond over the next few months. Also, look out for great new point-of-sale materials locally designed and produced by the Dell China team.

Behind the scenes we’re also working on a number of cool initiatives in China – improving ways of bringing Ubuntu to you.

Today, we announced that we are now extending this exciting programme into, and across India. To help support the growth and demand in India the program will start with a widescale roll out to 850 stores across India. As well as consumers and students, the stores will target and service the growing number of SMB and corporate customers using Ubuntu across India.

Over the next few months we will extend the retail programme further into new markets, with the goal of providing greater choice of devices pre-loaded with the latest versions of Ubuntu and vastly improved quality of advice from staff in resellers.

As always, we’re delighted to hear your feedback and suggestions.

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John Bernard

We’ve been extremely busy at Computex, with over 1,000 people visiting the Ubuntu booth, and over 25 media interviews about Ubuntu for Android, Ubuntu Cloud and Ubuntu TV.

One of the highlights so far was ARM’s Ian Ferguson, director of server systems and our very own Mark Shuttleworth presenting a keynote session at the Computex industry forum about cloud computing. As part of this, they unveiled MiTAC’s new ARM server, based on Ubuntu. This is only the third ARM server made in the world and it’s a significant step forward in a new era of hyperscale computing. Based on ARM processors, these servers have higher densities and lower power to enable more efficient cloud deployments and lower cost.

The MiTAC server can be seen on the Ubuntu stand at M0106, Nangang Exhibition Hall, alongside the latest developments in Desktop and Cloud until the end of the show on June 9th.

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John Bernard

Canonical will be exhibiting at Computex in Taipei, June 5th – 9th, Asia’s largest ICT trade show. We will be at the show alongside some our partners and biggest names in the industry. At the booth (at M0106 in the Nangang exhibition hall) we will be showcasing new products and services, including Ubuntu for Android, Ubuntu TV and Ubuntu Cloud.

Today, Ubuntu for Android will be demoed at a pre-show ARM media gathering and in addition, Mark Shuttleworth will be part of a keynote presentation on Tuesday at the TICC.

We look forward to seeing you at the booth. If you can’t be at Computex, we’ll be updating the blog with pictures and more as it unfolds.

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Jane Silber

If you’re a keen follower of all things open source, you might already know about the UK Government’s consultation on open software standards. In short, the Government wants to reduce its IT costs and improve interoperability across all its departments and agencies; sensible aims, indeed. It is therefore considering making the adoption of open standards mandatory.

 

This represents a tremendous opportunity for open-source suppliers and any software vendor who builds to open standards because, in effect, it enables competition on a level playing field with some of the industry’s biggest players. There are large corporations with plenty to lose, however. So it’s no surprise that some parties are already lobbying against the proposal.

 

As a company with a long commitment to open-source and open standards, Canonical is actively engaging in the debate. We are preparing a formal response to the consultation and we will be at the round table discussion in London on 27th April.

 
This consultation is a public process in which anyone can get involved. If you’re interested in its outcome, whether from a business or philosophical standpoint, I urge you to go to consultation.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/openstandards and make your case before the consultation closes, on 3rd May 2012. We certainly will.

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Cezzaine Haigh

Kicking off this May, the Ubuntu Cloud Summit is a one day event for both technology and business people interested in what cloud computing can do for their organisations.

Hosted by Canonical and Redmonk we’ll be looking at how open-source is playing a critical role in the move to cloud computing. Delegates will also hear how enterprises have made the most of the move to the cloud using open source. There will be plenty of opportunity for discussion and debate ensuring you have all the information you need to deploy an open cloud.

The day will include a keynote from Mark Shuttleworth and others, plus a panel discussion chaired by Stephen O’Grady of Redmonk, before closing with cocktails and canapes.

The Ubuntu Cloud Summit takes place on Tuesday 8th May, at the The Oakland Marriott City Center in Oakland.

The event is sure to be popular, so don’t miss your chance to be there.

To find out more, go to  uds.ubuntu.com/cloud-summit/

Hope to see you there!

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John Bernard

Ubuntu Cloud Day is Canonical’s first Cloud event in Bangalore. With keynote speeches from various members of the Canonical team and a more focussed technical delivery, the event is aimed at engineers and developers with a professional interest in using Ubuntu Cloud as a developer tool, along with those with a keen interest in developing innovative applications for the Ubuntu user base.

The event is sponsored by Intel and the agenda includes presentations on working with Ubuntu Cloud, JuJu, Cloud infrastructure, as well as presentations from Intel and other partners. The sessions will also cover the intricacies of building your own Cloud infrastructure with Ubuntu, managing Cloud workloads on your own servers and sending identical workloads to the public Cloud when you need extra capacity.

The location for Ubuntu Cloud Day is the Grand Ballroom at the Chancery Pavilion Hotel, 135 Residency Road, Bangalore.

There is a fee to participate, of INR 999.00. Registrations are restricted, so secure your place at http://www.ubuntucloudday.in

Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

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John Bernard

The Ubuntu booth at Mobile World Congress has been a resounding success. In the first two days of the show alone, over 4,000 delegates visited the stand to see the first live views of Ubuntu for Android.

The reception has been overwhelmingly positive among hardware manufacturers and operators, and indeed among hundreds of individuals and enterprises who can’t wait to get their hands on a new smartphone running Ubuntu for Android.

The race is on; who will become the first manufacturer to launch one of the most talked about products at the show – the real killer-app from Barcelona 2012.

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John Bernard

Mobile World Congress begins tomorrow, and for the first time, Canonical has a presence at the show.

Further to our announcement earlier this week, for the first time in public, we will be showcasing the brand new concept ‘Ubuntu for Android’.

Ubuntu for Android is the world’s first full-featured desktop on a docked smartphone. You can use Android on the phone and Ubuntu as your desktop, both running simultaneously on the same device, with seamless sharing of contacts, messages and other common services. Users get all the flexibility and productivity of a full desktop with the convenience of a smartphone when on the move. This is the first opportunity for handset makers and network operators to address this growth opportunity in emerging markets.

We are located in Hall 7 at stand 7C87, so visit to see Ubuntu on Android and Ubuntu TV – launched to great acclaim at CES last month – as well as the latest developments on Desktop, Ubuntu Cloud, Ubuntu One and Ubuntu on hardware for sale at retail.

More than ever in 2012, a record numbers of consumers and businesses are using Ubuntu. To set up a meeting with us during the show or to find out more on enabling your hardware with Ubuntu or working with Canonical, please email sales@canonical.com.

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John Bernard

Canonical and Ubuntu have made their CES debut this week, and already it’s been a
resounding success. Ubuntu TV and Ubuntu One have both been of particular interest to a constant flow of visitors from media to manufacturers, exhibitors and developers.

It is almost the end of day two and there have been over 5,000 visitors to the Ubuntu booth in South Hall 4 (stand 35379). In fact, people have been so impressed, that all the Ubuntu 11.10 CDs and printed Ubuntu TV collateral have run out. We have also given many interviews to the world’s media and have already seen some great coverage, which as many regulars to Ubuntu will appreciate, will help serve to introduce Ubuntu to many new potential users.

Ubuntu rocks!

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John Bernard

Canonical will have a presence at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, from the 10th – 13th January. The booth, in the Upper Level of South Hall 4, is at location 35379 within the Las Vegas Convention Center.

On display will be the latest in Desktop, Cloud and demonstrations on Ubuntu One, plus an exclusive Ubuntu concept design which will be announced during the show.

Find out more by coming to visit us at CES and see why Ubuntu is the primary computing environment on millions of desktops around the world and used by thousands of businesses. You can also discover how Canonical supports a rapidly increasing number of manufacturers pre-installing Ubuntu on their hardware.

To set up a meeting at the show and discuss Ubuntu, now the world’s third largest Desktop Operating System, email sales@canonical.com.

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John Bernard

Canonical launched Ubuntu at retail with Vodacom in October, and the Vodacom Webbook – embedded with Ubuntu – is currently available to buy in over 1,200 stores in South Africa. The product has been selling well and over the coming weeks is expected to be one of the ‘must have’ Christmas gifts for this year.

What makes it so appealing ? Ubuntu runs seamlessly on the Webbook and it works brilliantly with a range of printers, cameras, MP3 players and other peripherals. Ubuntu brings a fresh emphasis on usability that millions of existing users around the world already enjoy.

Ubuntu boots up in seconds, delivering a bundle of applications right out of the box. It’s ready to go, reliable, and security is rock-solid. It’s as effective for business as for pleasure. With LibreOffice, you can create professional documents that are fully compatible with Microsoft Office (TM). Social networking through Twitter and Facebook is easily accessible too, with the ability to effortlessly share pictures, play music and edit video.

You can buy the Vodacom Webbook here.

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John Bernard

Last week saw the third annual Ubuntu Hardware Summit (UHS) taking place in Taipei. With over two hundred attendees present, the show is fast becoming one of the must-attend events within the software, ODM and OEM environments across Taiwan.

With standing room only at the back of the room during the Keynote speech, Canonical set the scene for the next two years including the growth of Ubuntu, the multitude of device enablement and an insight into Ubuntu Cloud and Ubuntu Server. After the Keynote, UHS then went into break-out Tracks which included topics on Ubuntu Cloud, Thin Client solutions, hardware enablement and Ubuntu System Architecture.

You can find all presentations from the day at odm.ubuntu.com and clicking the link ‘Download material’.

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John Bernard

This year’s Ubuntu Hardware Summit (UHS) will take place on December 8th at the Grand Victoria Hotel in Taipei. You can register your place at www.ubuntu.com.uhs

Building on the success of 2010 (with over 200 attendees), the 2011 Ubuntu Hardware Summit promises to deliver more. With keynote speeches from various members of the Canonical team and a more focused technical delivery, UHS is created especially for product managers and engineers at ODMs and OEMs, with interest or responsibility in deploying Ubuntu on new computers and devices.

Highlights will include presentations on Ubuntu Server, deploying Ubuntu Cloud, QA, power management, hardware enablement….and much more! Details of the event can also be found on the new Ubuntu Hardware Debugging website at http://odm.ubuntu.com/portal/

UHS is sponsored by Canonical and free of charge.

To reserve your space, visit www.ubuntu.com/uhs today as registrations will close on 29th November 2011.

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Victor Tuson Palau

What do Chianti wines, Organic foods, and Spanish Ham have in common with Ubuntu Certified? The simple answer is that they all stand for quality.

Chianti is an Italian standard (DOCG) for Tuscany wines that requires using defined methods, satisfying set quality standards.

Organic Foods are foods free of artificial components such as synthetic pesticides and chemical fertilizers. These need to comply with standards set by national governments and international organizations.

Jamon de Huelva is a Spanish Protected Designation of Origin introduced to avoid “misleading of consumers by non-genuine products,which may be of inferior quality or of different flavour.”
Ubuntu Certified is granted to computer systems (desktop, laptop, netbook, server,..) that satisfy set quality standards for an Ubuntu release by using defined production methods.

“Ubuntu Certified” Quality Standards
Great user experience is not a one-off, it is an ongoing affair. The Ubuntu Certification program is committed to sustained quality. We test the certified machines at the start of the program and we continue to test in order to stop problems from being introduced via software updates or new releases.

Manufacturers such as Dell and Lenovo engage Canonical OEM Services to enable Ubuntu for their systems. Through this work, we have developed an in-depth knowledge of the most complex areas for hardware compatibility. Certification testing pays special attention to these areas.

“Ubuntu Certified” Production Methods
Certification is only issued if the quality standards are met on:

  • An unmodified image available from Ubuntu.com. Only modifications accepted as exceptions are those than can be done through a user interface option or tool. This exclude command line changes.
  • A Manufacturer Pre-installed Ubuntu image, as part of a Canonical engagement. This ensures any modifications done by the manufacturer are compatible with future Ubuntu updates.

Canonical works with manufacturers participating in the program to maintain labs with representative hardware located around the world. This allow us to find possible regressions earlier on.

We hope that you continue to enjoy your “Ubuntu Certified” system. If you have any questions don’t hesitate to contact us via Launchpad Answers.

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Victor Tuson Palau

Canonical offers a commercial certification programme where manufacturers (OEM & ODM) can apply for their systems to be validated and endorsed to work with Ubuntu.  We had two levels of endorsement for systems: “Ubuntu Certified” and “Ubuntu Ready”. Successful applications to the certification programme results in a certificate for the system being listed at Ubuntu.com/Certification

“Ubuntu Certified” is an endorsement by Canonical over the lifetime of an Ubuntu release, this includes ongoing validation of Security and Stable Release Updates for the certified system.”Ubuntu Ready” is an endorsement by Canonical at a specific point in time of an Ubuntu release and provides no re-assurance over future release updates.

Are you confused yet? We recognise that the differences between these endorsement levels is quite granular and perhaps not obvious to consumers. In order to simply things, we are planning to close down the “Ubuntu Ready” programme in time for Ubuntu 11.10 release in October.

The take away of the changes is that from 11.10 there will only be one Canonical-endorsed certification programme:“Ubuntu Certified“.

If you are familiar with the Ubuntu Ready programme, you might be asking yourself:

What will happen with the existing “Ubuntu Ready” Certificates?

We will no longer be offering new “Ubuntu Ready” services to OEMs or ODMS. Cutomers with existing “Ubuntu Ready” tokens will still be able to redeem them for 11.04. The existing Ubuntu Ready certificates will be maintained on the public website until the applicable releases reach end of life.

“Ubuntu Ready” came with a set of  testing tools that allowed manufacturers to check if their systems worked with Ubuntu. Are these tools being removed too?
We will continue to offer testing tools to partners and the community. The objective is to have a single test tool for partners and the Ubuntu community that will be available within the standard Ubuntu image (from Ubuntu 11.10).

“Ubuntu Ready” did not require a manufacturer to provide Canonical with System samples. Does “Ubuntu Certified” have hardware requirements?

Ubuntu Certified will continue to require hardware to be submitted to Canonical by manufacturers for testing. Ubuntu fortnightly Stable Release Updates (SRUs) means that certified systems are required to be tested every two weeks to ensure no regressions are introduced. Ubuntu Certification testing can be used by partners as a way to assess if certification will be successful before engaging in a contract with Canonical.

Can a system be certified with a customised Ubuntu image?

An OEM or ODM shipping a pre-install custom ISO with their systems can apply for Ubuntu Certified if it is an approved Canonical image. These systems are clearly labelled as only certified if Ubuntu is supplied by the manufacturer at purchase time.

Any other questions?

I am sure we have left something out that might be in the back of your  mind, so please tell us!

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