Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'desktop testing'

Ara

Magomatic

It’s been a while since the last time I blogged about Mago, but Natty is going to be an exciting cycle for desktop testing automation (a lot is happening!) and I would like to present some of the work we have been doing.

Today I will write about Magomatic, a new side project related to Mago.

If you have tried to add a new testcases to an existing Mago wrapper, you can see that this is pretty straight forward. Most of the things that you need are already there, and you need to add only the code of the test, without thinking on the accessibility information of the application (OK, sometimes you have to, but it is quite simple to start the process). If you, however, have ever tried to add a new wrapper application to Mago I guess that you have found the process a bit difficult: you need to understand how the accessibility information is presented by LDTP, you need to create the application python file, you also will have to create a test suite python file, and a XML data file. This is time consuming and I though it could (and should) be automated.

So I created Magomatic. And how does it work?

Magomatic uses templates and accessibility information to create those files for you. Using it is pretty straight forward:

  1. Open the application you want to create the wrapper for.
  2. Run Magomatic:
    $ bzr branch lp:magomatic
    $ cd magomatic/bin
    $ ./magomatic
  3. When prompted, you will need to select the window you want to create the wrapper for with the mouse pointer.
  4. Done! Under the
    data/

    folder you will find a folder with the name of the application with the needed files to add to Mago and start coding your tests.

This is a work in progress, but the main and most important functionality is already there. We really hope that this will lower the entry barrier to Mago and more people will join us adding new tests in the Natty cycle.

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Ara Pulido

A couple of weeks ago we launched the Desktop Testing Program. You can read more about it in the original announcement but, basically, we have some infrastructure to track test results for desktop applications, a wiki that stores the testcases description and a large community willing to test every Ubuntu milestone.

The Alpha 3 testing cycle went very well, but we still need more testcases to make the Beta testing cycle event better.

Mathieu Trudel-Lapierre, one of the Network Manager upstream developers, stepped ahead and wrote some testcases for Network Manager. He, as an upstream, wanted Network Manager to be part of the testing program, to have the opportunity to get test results every Ubuntu milestone. His tests will be part of the Desktop Testing Program starting on Maverick Beta.

If you are an upstream (or would like to collaborate somehow with your favourite upstream project), you can review the available tests in our testcases wiki, and, if the application is already there, make sure that the tests still apply and write more to cover new features. If your application is not there, just create a new page and start adding new testcases. In both cases you can follow our syntax guidelines.

I think this is a great opportunity for upstreams to have their project tested on a regular basis by a great community, with results they can browse, in a repeatable way. I just hope more upstreams could know about it. If only this blog was syndicated in Planet Gnome


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Ara Pulido

Today, one day after reaching the third Maverick milestone, Alpha 3, I am happy to announce the birth of a new testing project and team in Ubuntu: the Desktop Testing Team.

Every time we release a new Ubuntu milestone, testers are encouraged to install the new milestone and play around with it, filing bugs as they go. We want to go a bit further and use a more methodological approach for those people that love testing and want to help improving Ubuntu that way.

How will it work?

For every milestone of the development release of Ubuntu, we will be providing a series of testcases for you to run in that milestone. As soon as the milestone is officially released, you will be able to complete the tests in the following two weeks (although we encourage you to run them as soon as possible, to allow enough time for developers to fix the bugs).

One of the good things about this program is that you, as testers, will be able to know every time what to test, you will be able to check the new features before anybody else, and you will gain experience on the Ubuntu development process. Also, there will be a mailing list to share your experiences, bugs and to have direct feedback from the developers.

We will we using a test tracker to track your results and positive feedback (a test passed correctly) will be also really helpful. Right now, if things are working correctly, the developers need to guess it from the lack of test reports.

When will it start?

Just now! Although we don’t have a lot of testcases yet, we wanted to start the program just after the release of Maverick Alpha 3. The first weeks of the program are going to be busy and fun. Apart from testing and updating results, we are going to be introducing ourselves in the mailing list, commenting what testcases need updates and what applications we need to add when we reach Maverick Beta.

How can I participate?

Start by joining the Launchpad team and subscribe to the mailing list. Introduce yourself in the mailing list, tell us about you and what applications are you mostly interested in. Create an account in the tracker (if you already have an account at iso.qa.ubuntu.com it will work as well). Blog about it, tell your friends, tweet it. And, of course, start testing Maverick Alpha 3. We are going to make Ubuntu better. And GNOME. And many other applications that are part of Ubuntu.

You can find the full documentation on how to test on the Desktop Testing wiki page.


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