Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'canonical'

Ara

Last week, at UDS, I was asked several questions about how Ubuntu Certification worked. I decided I would start a set of blog posts about several aspects of the certification programme, for people willing to know a bit more about how we test and what.

One of the most confusing bits about Ubuntu Certification are BIOS options. In several ocassions I was asked the questions whether UEFI (with and without Secure Boot) was going to be added as part of Ubuntu Certification or not.

The answer is both yes and no. I will explain it a bit more in detail.

In Ubuntu Certification we don’t test BIOS options, nor we change them. We try to install Ubuntu with what it comes with the system from factory, and it needs to work up to a certification level using those options. That means that if it is using Legacy BIOS, we will be testing Legacy BIOS, if it comes with UEFI without Secure Boot, that is what we will be testing. If it comes with Secure Boot enabled, Ubuntu will need to install out of the box with the keys already in that system.

From 12.10 we have started to parse the BIOS information as part of the testing process:

We will be updating the public certification site to show that information there as well.

Same thing for BIOS options. We test with factory default options, and only those. The goal of doing this is that Ubuntu Certified systems should provide and out-of-the-box Ubuntu experience. In some cases, tweaking BIOS options can improve the situation for non working systems, but that is something we don’t want to acept for Ubuntu Certification.

 

Read more
Ara

We are hiring!

The Ubuntu Hardware Certification team is growing!

I am happy to announce that the hardware certification team is growing and we are now looking for a Certification Engineer to work in our lab in Lexington (MA).

The job is great if you like to develop automated testcases, but you also want to get your hands dirty with hardware configuration, networking, etc. You will be able to help a team that helps Ubuntu to work better in a wide range of hardware, helping developers debugging weird kernel bugs. This is also the team behind Ubuntu Friendly, so you will be able to help this great project as well!

So, if you live around the Boston area and you think your the person for the job, please, apply in the Canonical job site. Looking forward to reading your resumes!

Read more
Ara

After two years and a half in the Ubuntu QA team I have moved to the Hardware Certification team, on Platform Services. I was very happy to be given the opportunity to join the Hardware Certification team and I couldn’t reject. I am very excited to be able to help in the goal of making Canonical profitable.

How will that affect my collaboration with Ubuntu QA

It is been a great pleasure to work all this time with a great group of people  (both Canonical and non-Canonical). Obviously, as working directly on Ubuntu QA won’t be part of my paid job, I won’t be able to dedicate it as much as time as I did before. So, first of all, sorry if I am not getting back to you as quickly as I did in the past. But I love the Ubuntu QA community and I am still part of it. I will still be working on some of the things I did before, in my spare time. There are some projects, like the Desktop Testing Program or Desktop Testing Automation that are very close to my heart and I would like to stay somehow involved with them, I will try to attend the Ubuntu QA meeting at least twice per month and I will stay active in the ubuntu-qa mailing list.

The Hardware Certification Team

Having a successful certification program is both beneficial for vendors, ensuring their costumers that the hardware will work with Ubuntu, and the Ubuntu community, as they have access to the list of systems that work out of the box. We agree that sometimes we don’t expose the Hardware Certification program to our community as much as we should. There are people very active in the Ubuntu development that don’t know that Canonical has a public website where people can check what systems are certified to work with Ubuntu or even that the certification program exists. We don’t keep it as a secret, though; the Hardware Certification team has been attending UDS, our main testing tool is open sourced and installed by default in Ubuntu and, as I said, the systems that have been certified are published. I understand that we can do a better job explaining how the hardware certification program itself works and keep it more in the open, accepting suggestion and criticism.

To start with, Victor, the Hardware Certification team manager, has written a wiki page to explain a bit how the certification programs works and we have now a public project in Launchpad where you will be able to file bugs related to the project or ask questions. We would love to hear your thoughts and feedback about the program. In return, we will make our best to improve the program in ways that makes it more useful for our community.

Read more
Ara

The HW Certification team at Canonical is hiring three localized engineers: one in our offices in Lexington (MA), USA; one in Taipei, Taiwan; and one in Montréal, Canada.

The HW Certification team, part of Platform Services, provides certification as a service to partners. Basically, if a computer vendor wants to get one of their machines certified to work nicely with Ubuntu, they can buy this service.

The variety of work involved in our side is big and fun: from receiving the machines to be certified (some of them even brand new machines not yet public!), to commercial relationships, passing from a lot (a lot!) of technical work: writing testcases, maintaining our testing infrastructure, etc.

For me, working at Canonical, has been (and it is) the best professional experience I have had so far. It is great to be able to work in such a great environment, with very smart people and making Ubuntu better for everybody. I truly recommend Canonical as workplace. Please, ping me me on IRC if you would like to know more about how it is to work here.

So, if you live in any of these three locations or are willing to relocate (Canonical does not offer a relocation package), please, have a look to the following job descriptions and send your resume to victorp AT canonical DOT com.

Read more
Ara

So far, so good

It’s been more than two years since I started working at Canonical and, although I have been blogging about my daily job here, I have never talked about how this job is important to me.

I love testing software. Yes, I know it seems strange to love an activity that some other people find a bit tedious, but I do. I was a full time developer when I discovered that I liked testing the software. Testing software gets you the opportunity to see the product as a whole, but without losing the technical part of the job. So, when I got the opportunity to work at Canonical as a member of the Ubuntu QA team it was like a dream job. Not only I was going to be able to test free software during my daily job but, also, I was going to test ALL the free software that is included in Ubuntu.

When I was hired, one of my first missions was to create a way to to test the desktop in a repeatable way, easy to maintain. That’s how Mago project started, a couple of years ago. Working on this project has been great, as it has been working closely with LDTP upstream developers. I have contributed to LDTP through bug reports, patches and helping with the release of LDTP in Ubuntu. I always tried that the latest LDTP was successfully released and uploaded to Ubuntu.

I specially remember when we were trying to get the latest LDTP before Ubuntu 10.04 Feature Freeze. Nagappan, the main LDTP upstream developer and I worked closely on IRC to meet the deadline. Together, we fixes issued, verified them, got everything together and got it uploaded it to Ubuntu just in time. It was the perfect example of Open Source collaboration.

Mago, itself, is free software, released under the GPLv3. People inside and outside Canonical have contributed to it with bug reports, patches, new features and, of course, new tests to test the desktop applications, often GNOME applications.

But, apart from Mago and desktop testing automation, I am specially happy to be able to test all the open source bits that make Ubuntu: from the kernel to the desktop, from brand new topics as Multitouch, to all time classics as Firefox.

I work for Canonical, testing free software, trying to make it better for everybody. I need to remind myself everyday how privilege I am.

Read more