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David

Another edition of the Ubuntu App Developer Week and another amazing knowledge sharing fest around everything related to application development in Ubuntu. Brought to you by a range of the best experts in the field, here’s just a sample of the topics they talked about: App Developer Strategy, Bazaar, Bazaar Explorer, Launchpad, Python, Internationalization, Launchpad Translations, Unity, Unity 2D, Gedit Developer Plugins, the MyApps Portal, the App Review Board, the UbuntuSoftware Centre, Unity Mail, Launchpad Daily Builds, Ubuntu One APIs, Rapid App Development, Quickly, GooCanvas, PyGame, Unity Launcher, Vala, the App Developer Site, Indicators, Python Desktop Integration, Libgrip, Multitouch, Unity Lenses, Ubuntu One Files Integration, The Business Side of Apps, Go, Qt Quick… and more. Oh my!

And a pick of what they had to say:

We believe that to get Ubuntu from 20 million to 200 million users, we need more and better apps on Ubuntu
Jonathan Lange on making Ubuntu a target for app developers

Bazaar is the world’s finest revision control system
Jonathan Riddell on Bazaar

So you’ve got your stuff, wherever you are, whichever device you’re on
Stuart Langridge on Ubuntu One

Oneiric’s EOG and Evince will be gesture-enabled out of the box
Jussi Pakkanen on multitouch in Ubuntu 11.10

I control the upper right corner of your screen ;-)
Ted Gould on Indicators

If you happened to miss any of the sessions, you’ll find the logs for all of them on the Ubuntu App Developer Week page, and the summaries for each day on the links below:

Ubuntu App Developer Week – Day 5 Summary

The last day came with a surprise: an extra session for all of those who wanted to know more about Qt Quick and QML. Here are the summaries:

Getting A Grip on Your Apps: Multitouch on GTK apps using Libgrip

By Jussi Pakkanen

In his session, Jussi talked about one of the most interesting technologies where Ubuntu is leading the way in the open source world: multitouch. Walking the audience through the Grip Tutorial, he described how to add gesture support to existing applications based on GTK+ 3. He chose to focus on the higher layer of the uTouch stack, where he explained the concepts on which libgrip, the gesture library, is built upon, such as device types and subscriptions. After having explored in detail the code examples, he then revealed that in Oneiric Eye Of GNOME and Evince, Ubuntu’s default image viewer and default PDF reader, will be gesture-enabled.

Check out the session log.

Creating a Google Docs Lens

By Neil Patel

Neil introduced his session explaining the background behind Lenses: a re-architecture effort of the now superseded Places concept to make them more powerful, provide more features and make it easier to add features through a re-engineered API. Lenses create its own instance, add categories, filters and leave the searching to Scopes. The Lenses/Scopes pairs are purely requests for data, independent of the type of UI, and being provided by the libunity library, they can be written in any of the programming languages supported by GObject Introspection (Python, Javascript, C/C++, Vala, etc.). To illustrate all of this concepts, Neil devoted the rest of the session to a real example of creating a Lens for Google Docs.

Check out the session log.

Practical Ubuntu One Files Integration

By Michael Terry

Another hands-on session from Michael, with a real world example on how to supercharge apps with cloud support. Using his experience in integrating the Ubuntu One Files API to Deja Dup, the default backup application in Ubuntu, he went in detail through the code of a simple program to talk to a user’s personal Ubuntu One file storage area. We liked Michael’s session so much that it will very soon be featured as a tutorial on developer.ubuntu.com!

Check out the session log and Michael’s awesome notes.

Publishing Your Apps in the Software Center: The Business Side

By John Pugh

Ubuntu directly benefits from Canonical becoming a sustainable business to support its development, and that’s exactly what John talked about. Being responsible for business development in the Ubuntu Software Centre, he’s got a privileged  insight on how to make it happen. He started off explaining that the main goal is to present Ubuntu users with a large catalog of apps available for purchase, and then continued concentrating on how to submit paid applications to be published in the Software Centre. A simple 5-step process, the behind-the-scenes work can be summarized in: Canonical helps packaging the app, it hosts the app and provides the payment via pay.ubuntu.com, in a 80%/20% split. Other highlights include the facts that only non-DRM, non-licensed apps cannot be submitted right now, but there is ongoing work to implement license key support, and that MyApps, the online app submission portal, can take any nearly any content: apps with adverts, “free” online game clients and HTML5 apps.

Check out the session log.

Writing an App with Go

By Gustavo Niemeyer

Gustavo’s enthusiasm for Go, the new programming language created by Google shows every time you start a conversation with him on that topic. And it showed as well on this session, in which he created yet another “Hello world” application in a new language -you guessed-: Go. Along the way, he had time to describe all of the features of this new addition of the extensive family of programming languages: statically compiled with good reflection capabilities, structural typing, interfaces and more.

Check out the session log.

Qt Quick At A Pace

By Donald Carr

Closing the week on the last -and surprise- session, we had the luxury of having Donald, from the Nokia Qt team, the makers of Qt itself, to talk about Qt Quick. Using a clear and concise definition, Qt Quick is an umbrella term used to refer to QML and its associated tooling; QML being a declarative markup language with tight bindings to Javascript. A technology equally suited to mobile or to the desktop, QML enables developers to rapidly create animation-rich, pixmap-oriented UIs. Through the qtmediahub and Qt tutorial examples, he explored QML’s capabilities and offered good practices for succesfully developing QML-based projects.

Check out the session log.

Wrapping Up

Finally, if you’ve got any feedback on UADW, on how to make it better, things you enjoyed or things you believe should be improved, your comments will be very appreciated and useful to tailor this event to your needs.

Thanks a lot for participating. I hope you enjoyed it  as much as I did, and see you again in 6 months time for another week full with app development goodness!


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David

Ubuntu App Developer Week – Day 4 Summary

Last day of UADW! While we’re watching the final sessions, here’s what happened yesterday:

Creating an App Developer Website: developer.ubuntu.com

By John Oxton and David Planella

Creating the concept and implementing a site for app developers is no easy task. The Ubuntu App Developer site is meant to be a place for app authors to get started with development, to find the information they need and to be able to publish their apps in the Software Centre. John explained all the research and user testing that happened behind the scenes, highlighting the key findings, while David focused on the purpose of the site, where it fits in the overall developer strategy for Ubuntu and the plans for the future.

Check out the session log here.

Rapid App Development with Quickly

By Michael Terry

Fitting nicely topicwise with the questions about the default choice of tools for Ubuntu development on the previous session, Michael gave an overview of what Quickly is and how to use it. Going through the workflow of creating your first app with Quickly, he demonstrated all the key commands and explained in detail all the bits in between.

Check out the session log here.

Developing with Freeform Design Surfaces: GooCanvas and PyGame

By Rick Spencer

Rick started off the session explaining what GooCanvas and PyGame were good for: providing a 2D surface on which to construct interactive GUIs for users. Beginning with GooCanvas, he showed with a very simple example how to get started playing with 2D composing surfaces, adding images, text and doing other operations such as resizing and calculating coordinates to determine clicks. Next up was PyGame, for the same purpose, but better suited for apps with lots of animation updates without user input. He then wrapped up with three samples of simple games to study.

Check out the session log here.

Making your app appear in the Indicators

By Ted Gould

Ted Gould, the man who controls the upper right corner of our screen, talked all about indicators. The idea was to illustrate how to get the information that comes from applications and handle it to the indicators. First up was the messaging menu, a menu to handle human-to-human communication, next the application indicators, which alllow long-running apps to put statuses on the panel consistently, and finally the sound indicator, taking care of all related to sound. Each one of them explained with code examples. Nice!

Check out the session log here.

Will it Blend? Python Libraries for Desktop Integration

By Marcelo Hashimoto

Marcelo shared his experience acquired with Polly, a Twitter client he developed, on using Python and libraries to let apps provide better integration to the desktop. First explaining the concept of desktop integration, stressing the fact that it’s not only about visuals. The rest of the session was structured around 3 main areas: how to send notifications to the user, where to place files read or written by an app and what to use to store sensitive information. A very clear and solid session, also with example code for easy learning.

Check out the session log here.

The Day Ahead: Upcoming Sessions for Day 4

Check out the first-class lineup for the last day of UADW:

16.00 UTCGetting A Grip on Your Apps: Multitouch on GTK apps using Libgrip

Multitouch is everywhere these days, and now on your desktop as well -brought to you by developers such as Jussi Pakkanen, who’ll guide through using libgrip to add  touch support to your GTK+ apps. Learn how to use this cool new library in your own software!

17:00 UTCCreating a Google Docs Lens

Lenses are ways of presenting data coming from different sources in Unity. Neil Patel knows Lenses inside out and will present a practical example of how to create a Google Docs one. Don’t miss this session on how to put two cool technologies together!

18:00 UTCPractical Ubuntu One Files Integration

Yet again the Deja-dup rockstar and UADW regular Michael Terry will be sharing his deep knowledge on developing apps. This time it’s about adding cloud support to applications: integrating with the Ubuntu One files API.

19:00 UTCPublishing Your Apps in the Software Center: The Business Side

Closing the series of sessions around publishing apps in the Software Centre, we’ll have the luxury of having John Pugh, from the team that brings you commercial apps into the Software Centre and who’ll be talking about the business side of things.

20:00 UTC – Writing an App with Go

Go is the coolest kid around in the world of programming languages. Gustavo Niemeyer is very excited about it and will be showing you how to write an app using this language from Google. Be warned, his enthusiasm is contagious!

20:00 UTC – Qt Quick At A Pace

A last minute and very welcome addition to the schedule. In his session Donald Carr will introduce you to Qt Quick to create applications with Qt Creator and QML, the new declarative language that brings together designers and developers.

Looking forward to seeing you all there!


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David

Ubuntu App Developer Week – Day 3 Summary

Time flies and we’re already halfway through UADW, but there is still much to come! Here’s yesterday report for your reading pleasure:

Unity Mail: Webmail Notification on Your Desktop

By Dmitry Shachnev

Starting off with a description of the features of Unity Mail, such as displaying webmail unread message count, notifications and mail subjects, we then learned more about how it was developed and the technologies that were used to create it. It’s written in Python, using GObject introspection (PyGI) and integrates with Ubuntu through the Unity, Notify and Indicate modules. After describing each one in more detail, Dmitry continued talking about how the app can be translated using Launchpad, and how he uses the Bazaar  source revision control system to work with code history. Wrapping up, he went through the plans for the future: more configuration options, marking all messages as read and the need for a new icon. Any takers? ;)

Check out the session log here.

Launchpad Daily Builds and Rapid Feedback: Writing Recipe Builds

By Jelmer Vernooij

Assuming some previous knowledge on Debian packaging, in his session Jelmer walked the audience through a practical example of a basic recipe build for a small project: pydoctor. Drawing the cooking recipe analogy, package recipes are a description of the ingredients (source code branches) and how to put them together, ending up with a delicious Debian package for users to enjoy. Launchpad can build packages from recipes once or automatically on a daily basis provided the code has changed, conveniently placing the result in a PPA. In the last part of the session, he described in detail the contents of an existing recipe and added some notes on best practices when building from a recipe.

Check out the session log here.

Using the Ubuntu One APIs for Your Apps: An Overview

By Stuart Langridge

The idea bahind the Ubuntu One developer programme is to make it easy to add the cloud to your apps and make new apps for the cloud. With this opening line, Stuart delivered a talk about a high-level overview on the cool things you can do as an app developer adding Ubuntu One support. One aspect it data: for example building applications that work on the desktop, on mobile phones and on the web, securely sharing data among users. Another is music: streaming, streaming music and sharing playlists on the desktop, on mobile and from the web, all through a simple REST HTTP API. He also mentioned some examples of cloud enabled applications: Shutter and Deja-Dup, and many other interesting ways to use Ubuntu One to do exciting thigs with data. And you can get started already using the available documentation.

Check out the session log here.

Supercharging Your Apps with Unity Launcher Integration

By Jason Smith

In his talk, Jason first went through the terminology that covers the elements related to the Unity Launcher, and the bachground behind the Launcher API, implemented in the libunity library. Libunity can be used in many programming languages: Python, C, Vala and others supported by GObject Introspection. Going through what you can do with the Launcher (marking/unmarking apps as urgent, setting object counts, setting progress on objects and adding quicklist menu items to the object), he used Vala snippets to illustrate each feature with code.

Check out the session log here.

Hello Vala: An Introduction to the Vala Language

By Luca Bruno

Vala, a new programming language with C#-like syntax that compiles to C and targets the GObject type system: with a clear statement of what Vala is and what it can do, Luca, a contributor to the project introduced one by one the mostkey features of the language through his “Hello world” example: namespaces, types, classes, properties, keywords and more. As a highlight he mentioned Vala’s automatic memory management using reference counting, andits interoperability with other languages, most notably C, but it can also work with many others supported by GObject Introspection. Other cool featuresto note were also error handling on top of GError, support for async operations, closures and DBus client/server, on each of which he elaborated before finishing the session.

Check out the session log here.

The Day Ahead: Upcoming Sessions for Day 3

Another day, another awesome set of sessions coming up:

16.00 UTCCreating an App Developer Website: developer.ubuntu.com

Ubuntu 11.10 will not only bring new features to the OS itself. In time for the release we’ll be launching the new Ubuntu App Developer site, a place for developers to find all the infromation and the resources they need to get started creating, submitting and publishing their apps in Ubuntu. John Oxton, David Planella and many other people have worked to make the next developer.ubuntu.com possible and will tell you all about it.

17:00 UTCRapid App Development with Quickly

Quickly is a wrapper that pulls together all the recommended tools and technologies to bring apps from creation and through their whole life cycle in Ubuntu. With an easy set of commands that hide all the complexity for your, it effectively enables developers to follow rapid development principles and worry only about writing code. Michael Terry, from the Quickly development team will be looking forward to guide you through the first steps with this awesome tool.

18:00 UTCDeveloping with Freeform Design Surfaces: GooCanvas and PyGame

Have you ever wondered what freeform design surfaces, or canvases are? You probably have now. Well, lucky you then, because Rick Spencer will be here to tell you what they’re good for and how to get started with them ;)

19:00 UTCMaking your app appear in the Indicators

In another session on how to integrate with the platform, Ted Gould, the man who knows most about them, will describe how to add indicator features  to your apps, both in terms of panel indicators and messaging menu support.

20:00 UTC – Will it Blend? Python Libraries for Desktop Integration

You certainly will want your app to have that familiar look and feel at home in the OS it’s running on, but you’ll also want it to use all the backend technologies to integrate even deeper and provide a great user experience. Well, fear not, for Marcelo Hashimoto is here to tell you exactly how to do that!

Looking forward to seeing you all there in a few hours!


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David

Ubuntu App Developer Week – Day 2 Summary

Another app developer day is over and we’re nearly halfway through the week. Here’s what happened yesterday:

Making Your App Speak Languages with Launchpad Translations

By David Planella

In this session we learned how to link up an app that already has internationalization support to Launchpad Translations, so that it is exposed to Launchpad’s extensive community of translators who’ll effectively make your app speak almost any language. From setting up code hosting for a seamless integration, to setting up the translations settings to tips and tricks for best practices, the presentation should give developers a good grasp of how to start getting their apps translated and ready to reach a wider audience.

Check out the session log here.

The Making of Unity 2D

By Florian Boucault

An interactive and popular session, in which Florian started describing the main goal behind the Unity 2D project: to run on platforms that do not provide accelerated OpenGL. It essentially is an implementation of the main Unity user interface using the Qt toolkit and the QML declarative language, while reusing the backend technologies from Unity. From there he went on describing the Unity 2D architecture and the release policy, pointing out to the Unity 2D daily PPA, for those testers who want to be on the bleeding edge., and wrapped up answering the questions from the audience.

Check out the session log here.

Making App Development Easy: Gedit Developer Plugins

By Curtis Hovey

Starting off with a description of Gedit plugins, their purpose and how to install them, Curtis delved into the general-purpose plugins and the developer plugins (click to install) plugins, explaining how to set them up and his recommended choice of plugins to convert Gedit in the perfect programming editor. The highlights included the GDP Bazaar integration plug in, which allows working with the bzr source revision control system and others (Subversion, Mercurial, Git), as well as the Source Code Browser plugin, a class and function browser based on Exuberant Ctags.

Check out the session log here.

Publishing Your Apps in the Software Center: The MyApps Portal

By Anthony Lenton

In another session devoted to the app developer strategy, Anthony told us all about the MyApps webapp developers can use to submit their applications to the Software Center. Available on https://myapps.developer.ubuntu.com, it started off as the need to automate the submission of commercial apps to the Software Centre, expanding to a full-blown online portal that can now tackle any type of submission. He then walked the audience through the 5-step process to send an app for review, including all the necessary metadata and payment details. Once an app has been submitted, it needs to be packaged (if it wasn’t already) and reviewed before being published. Hinting to Jonathan Lange’s session on day 1, Anthony explained that they are looking at providing an automated process for packaging, with the intention of removing the last big remaining manual process.

Check out the session log here.

Publishing Your Apps in the Software Center: The App Review Board

By Stéphane Graber

Complementing the previous session, Stéphane explained how libre+gratis apps can get into the Software Centre and what the App Review Board’s (ARB) role is in that process. He focused on how the Board reviews applications and how other types are distributed in Ubuntu. The types of apps reviewed by the ARB are small, lightweight apps, usually of the type created by Quickly (check out the sessions on Quickly on Thursday!). The next upcoming changes in the way this applications are reviewed will most probably include them being submitted through the MyApps online portal and them being made more secure by wrapping them in a container based on AppArmor or Arkose (or a combination of them).

Check out the session log here.

The Day Ahead: Upcoming Sessions for Day 3

Check out today’s rocking lineup:

16.00 UTCUnity Mail: Webmail Notification on Your Desktop

We’re starting to see more and more apps that integrate with Unity. Unity Mail is a cool app that allows you to stay up to date with your web mail directly from your desktop. It supports any IMAP server, but right now it works best with Gmail, along with notifications, message counts, quicklists and more. Dmitry Shachnev will tell us about its features and how he put the application together.

17:00 UTCLaunchpad Daily Builds and Rapid Feedback: Writing Recipe Builds

Launchpad has many awesome features. This time around Jelmer Vernooij will be explaininghow to set up recipe builds for your project in Launchpad, so that users can get  the latest updates easily packaged on a daily basis, so that they can install them at a click of a button and can test them and make the feedback loop as short as possible.

18:00 UTCUsing the Ubuntu One APIs for Your Apps: An Overview

Ubuntu One is starting to be everywhere, and it even has its own developer programme. The Ubuntu One website already provides lots of information to developers, and to make it even more clear, Stuart Langridge will walk you through the available Ubuntu One APIs you can use to make your application cloud-ready.

19:00 UTCSupercharging Your Apps with Unity Launcher Integration

One of the easiest and more visual ways for your apps to blend in with Unity is for it to integrate with the Launcher. Counts, progress indication, quicklists… are an elegant and simple wayto provide feedback to users. Jason Smith knows all about Launcher integration, and he’s really looking forward to share it with us!

20:00 UTC – Hello Vala: An Introduction to the Vala Language

Vala is a powerful programming language that allows modern programming techniques to be used to write applications that run on the GNOME runtime libraries, particularly GLib and GObject. Luca Bruno is part of the team that develops Vala itself, and will be introducing us to the first steps to get started with Vala with the universal “Hello world” app becoming “Hello Vala!”.

Looking forward to seeing you all there in a few hours!


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David

App Developer Week

What an awesome week for application developers. Ubuntu App Developer Week was a week of great speakers, great sessions, great participation, Multitouch, Unity, GObject, Introspection, PyGI, Qt, Qt Quick, QML, Internationalization, KDE, Phonon, Multimedia, Touchegg, Plasma Widgets, Python, Testing, Rapid Prototyping, Thunderbird, GStreamer, Zeitgeist, D-Bus, Ubuntu One, Bazaar, Lenses, Launcher API, Indicators, Launchpad, Translations, Application Review Process, Packaging, pkgme, the Sound Menu, and much much more.

Here’s a recap of the whole week:

If you happened to miss any of the sessions, simply head to the Ubuntu App Developer Week page where you’ll find the logs for all of them.

Ubuntu App Developer Week – Day 5 Summary

Here comes the last of the summaries for your reading pleasure. Enjoy!

Qt Quick: Extend with C++

By Jürgen Bocklage-Ryannel

In this session Jürgen did another brief intro to Qt Quick: a declarative language to creat user interfaces on top of Qt C++. The subject was to extend it using the C++ language, and for this he introduced QtDeclarative, a UI runtime provided in a Qt module Qt Quick is based on. After this, he walked us through code examples: the first step – include QtDeclarative in the project in order to be able to use it in a C++ main.cpp file. Starting with basic tasks such as changing properties such as the colour of a rectangle from the C++ side, he went into more advanced ones, such as create a new qm element. Even more advanced tasks, such ad creating own elements, were left as a reading exercise with a pointer to the exhaustive Qt Quick documentation and tutorials.

Check out the session log here.

Phonon: Multimedia in Qt

By Harald Sitter

For the third time this week, Harald rocked the house with an entertaining and enlightening session: Phonon, a multimedia abstraction library. First, he showed how to get the environment set up and tools installed; next: an intro to Phonon – an abstraction layer between multimedia apps and a multimedia library backend in the form of a plugin. And next up some coding: the famous 3-line example to create a Phonon-based video player with C++. He showed us how to write a simple audio player, to which then video was progressively added. As a finale he pointed to a way to create a video player with no code at all!

Check out the session log here.

Integrating music applications with the Sound Menu

By Conor Curran

Conor started off explaining that sound menu integration in the next cycle will be made much easier through libunity, and talked a bit about the sound menu spec and the resources for contributors. He then explained that this cycle he concentrated on settling the architecture, making it easier for clients to provide integration. The only thing for a client to care about is to raise an MPRIS interface with a desktop entry, which will then allow it to be shown in the sound menu, and if available, any D-Bus menu items with it. He wrapped up with a description of some of the new features this cycle and an outlook on the next.

Check out the session log here.

pkgme: Automating The Packaging Of Your Project

By James Westby

On to packaging: James introduced pkgme, an almost magic tool to package your application to be distributed to users. Assuming your project uses a standard layout and pkgme has heard of it, it will use one of its backend to create the packaging structure tailored to your layout and toolset. New backends can be created upon request. As the finale, a recursive example: he showed us how to use pkgme to package pkgme itself!

Check out the session log here.

Unity Technical Q&A

By Jason Smith and Jorge Castro

Jason and Jorge started off this exciting session with an introduction to the cool things you can do in Unity: Lenses – bits of pluggable UI to mash up websites and applications in the dash, the Launcher API. After that questions started to kick in: What’s dee? Can you add multiple progress bars to the launcher? What’s the status of progress bars, badges and counters in the launcher? What search backend does the dash use? … if want to know the answer to these and more questions check out the session log :)

Check out the session log here.

Lightning Talks

By Stefano Palazzo, David Callé, Dustin Kirkland, MeanEye, Christian Muehlhaeuser, Nathan Handler

As the grand finale for a week packed with great sessions, even more concentraded content on a set of lightning talks to showcase cool projects created using the technologies available in Ubuntu: StackExchange App – a Unity Lens designed to work with Ask Ubuntu; Unity Book Lens – a Unity Lens to search through free online libraries; Bikeshed – a breeding ground for new/interesting/even-trivial-but-helpful scripts and programs; Sunflower FM – a twin-panel file GTK+ manager; Tomahawk – a social music player written in C++ and Qt; ClassBot – an IRC bot to help with running classroom sessions in #ubuntu-classroom

Check out the session log here.

Thanks!

I’d like to thank all session leaders for taking the time to prepare awesome content and deliver the sessions, and all participants for their attention and their interesting questions. You all made Ubuntu App Developer Week possible, and a success!

We’ll be back in 6 months time with a newer and cooler App Developer Week edition for you. See you then!




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David

Ubuntu App Developer Week – Day 4 Summary

Ramping up to the end of the week we had another full app development goodness day, and one where the session topics fitted together in a nice workflow as well: creating bling, creating apps with Rapid Prototyping, getting them into Ubuntu, adding indicator support and translating them. Here’s the report of yesterday’s app development journey:

Qt Quick: Elements/Animations/States

By Jürgen Bocklage-Ryannel

The next Qt Quick session was all about creating attractive and usable user interfaces. Jürgen went through the QML tutorial documentation and code examples, showing us how to position elements with anchors, columns, rows and grids. Then onto states and transitions: describing the changes in an element’s properties and how to switch between them. To finalize, the most impressive stuff: QML animations, in which he teached us the different types of animations and how to use them.

Check out the session log here.

Qt Quick: Rapid Prototyping

By Jürgen Bocklage-Ryannel

In Jürgen’s words, Qt Quick was designed to bridge the gap between designers and developers, letting both groups to work with the same technologies and code base. He explained how Qt Creator provides a design mode which allows easy dragging and dropping of UI elements, and separation between code and interface. All through a natural and agile prototyping workflow.

Check out the session log here.

Rapid App Development with Quickly

By Michael Terry

Michael started introducing what Quickly at the heart is: a robust yet simple system of templates with boilerplate code and commands. The available templates are ubuntu-application, ubuntu-cli, ubuntu-pygame and ubuntu-flash-game, and on the Natty version, Quickly will feature the ‘submitubuntu’ command to help getting applications into the Software Center. All that being set straight, he then showed how to use Quickly and what it can do: from creating the first example application, to modifying the UI with ‘quickly design’ and Glade, into debugging and finally packaging.

Check out the session log here.

Getting Your App in the Distro: the Application Review Process

By Allison Randal

Linking from the previous session on how to create an app, Allison explained in a very clear way how to get your applications into Ubuntu, so that they make their way into the OS in a matter of weeks instead of having to wait until the next release. The first step is to submit a ticket to the App Review Board, giving them the essential details for the proposal. They’ll then do the initial review, in which one of the reviewers will volunteer to walk you through the process and help you with suggestions or improvements, to bring the app to a state ready for the final review. There the board will vote in a meeting for the inclusion of the application. After the process description she answered the questions from the audience and wrapped up with some useful tips to application submitters.

Check out the session log here.

Adding Indicator Support to your Apps

By Ted Gould

Ted kicked off with an explanation of what indicators are and their intended use: they should not be used just because they are available – rather as a feature for long running applications, those that are more services to users, to expose that functionality. The next step was to describe how to create indicators through libappindicator, with any language supported by GObject Introspection, such as Python or Javascript, and how to add more features to a basic indicator: accessible labels and attention state. After that he described fallbacks, and how platforms not using Unity can nevertheless use indicators. The final minutes were dedicated to the future of indicators, that for now will focus on API cleanup and stabilization, and introspection improvements.

Check out the session log here.

Using Launchpad to get your application translated -

By Henning Eggers

As a follow up to the talk on how to add native language support to your applications on Monday, Henning described the next step: how to make them translatable in Launchpad and grow a translation community around them. In the first part he showed how to set up a demo project using Launchpad’s staging server, and shared some recommendations on how to make sure the application is correctly set up for translations, followed by an overview on some Gettext concepts Launchpad relies upon. From there, it was straight into business: setting up a translatable project in Launchpad, getting translatable templates imported and exposed to translators, creating a translation community for your project and the workflow for translation. A very detailed overview to get your application to talk any language.

Check out the session log here.

The Day Ahead: Upcoming Sessions for Day 5

The last day and the quality and variety of the sessions is still going strong. Check out the great content we’ve prepared for you today:

16:00 UTC
Qt Quick: Extend with C++ – Jürgen Bocklage-Ryannel
Sometimes you would like to extend Qt Quick with your own native extension. Jürgen will show you some ways how to do it.

17:00 UTC
Phonon: Multimedia in Qt - Harald Sitter
Harald, as the lead developer of the Qt/KDE multimedia library Phoon will tell you about the awesomeness that Phonon provides and how it achieves ultimate portability, so that it can even run on vending machines. He’ll also tell you hos to create a video player with 3 lines of code (or in 30 seconds without any code) and much more.

18:00 UTC
Integrating music applications with the Sound Menu - Conor Curran
So you’ve seen the slick sound menu in Ubuntu, and you’re developing a multimedia application, right? You’re then wondering how to seamlessly integrate it into Ubuntu and use all the nice features from the menu as well? Wonder no more, for Conor is the man behind the sound menu and he’ll be delighted to teach you how.

19:00 UTC
pkgme: Automating The Packaging Of Your Project - James Westby
Once you’ve developed a cool application you’ll want to package it and distribute it to users so that they can easily install it in their favourite platform. James will show you how this can be both easy and fun letting pkgme do all the work for you.

20:00 UTC
Unity Technical Q&A - Jason Smith and Jorge Castro
You’ve heard about Unity, the new UI concept which is going to improve several orders of magnitude how you interact with your computer in Ubuntu. You are probably using it already, and you’ll surely have questions and will want to learn more about the coolness it brings. Jason Smith, from the Unity development team, and Jorge Castro, from the Community team know all about Unity and they’ll be here to chat with you.

21:00 UTC
Lightning Talks - Nigel Babu
As the final treat to close the week, Nigel has organized a series of lightning talks to showcase a medley of cool applications: CLI Companion, Unity Book Lens, Bikeshed, circleoffriends, Algorithm School, Sunflower FM, Tomahawk Player, Classbot – your app could be in this list next time, do check them out!

Looking forward to seeing you all there!


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David

Ubuntu App Developer Week – Day 2 Summary

Wow, what a great follow-up to the first day! The second Ubuntu App Developer Week brought lots of awesome: great speakers and sessions, great participation, improvisation, Python, GTK, KDE, Qt, PyGI, Zeitgeist, Gstreamer, Introspection, Thunderbird, Unity, API Integration, hacking, fun… all the buzzwords you can associate when developing in your favourite Free Software Platform.

PyGTK is dead, long live PyGI! Using gobject-introspection in Python

By Martin Pitt

Martin’s complementary session to the GObject Introspection (GI) one on Monday was very popular. He started off with a recap of what GI is and the importance of the availability of several programming language bindings in any modern development platform. He provided an overview on how GI works in practice, and then delved into how it actually works in Python through the use of Pygobject and the gi.repository module, with lots of coding examples and comparison with traditiona GTK+ C code. After that he described other API differences, in particular the caveats with contructoirs, passing arrays, output arguments, GDestroyNotify and what to do with non-introspectable functions or methods. The next topic where overrides: how to provide custom code to override the introspected library’s objects. The second part of the session focused on explaining in detail how to migrate old PyGtk code to GTK3 and PyGI, in a series of easy guidelines: renaming, checking and repeating, and packaging changes. He wrapped up with a series of pointers on how to learn more and a Q+A session with lots of interesting questions from the audience.

Check out the session log here.

Zeitgeist API & Zeitgeist Application Integration

By Manish Sinha (???? ??????) and Seif Lotfy

For this session we had the luxury of having two key members of the Zeitgeist project to explain us all the details on how to integrate it to your own projects.  Manish, one of the Zeitgest developers, kicked off with an introduction on what Zeitgeist is: an automatic event logger which logs the events that happen on your computer. He then went on through the details of the Zeitgest terminology (events, manifestations, actors, timestamps…), architecture, and its interaction with D-Bus, with an overview of the API interface and the existing bindings: Python, C/Vala and C#. The session went on with examples of how real world applications and data providers use Zeitgeist, such as EOG plugins or Tomboy. Seif then chipped in with an example of  how Zeitgeist support was integrated into a GEdit plugin. Throughout the session lots of interesting questions were raised by the audience.

Check out the session log here.

GStreamer+Python: Multimedia Swiss Army Machete

By Jason DeRose

A very intersesting session indeed. In it, Jason explained all the points why GStreamer is the multimedia framework due to its economy of scale and why Python is the perfect complement with its simplicity and language clarity. According to him, together they provide the ultimative multimedia development tool, and this was why he chose to use them in hos own project: Novacut, the distributed video editor. From this point on, it was “Learning by doing”, and he then walked thorugh the code examples he’d set up for the session, showcasing how simple it is to work with multimedia streams with his swiss army machete :)

Check out the session log here.

KDE Development Intro: Q+A

By Harald Sitter and Jonathan Riddell

I’d especially like to mention this session due to a change of schedule. The original speaker, KDE/Kubuntu ninja Joathan Thomas could not make if due to last-minute commitments. But no worries, KDE/Kubuntu friends are always there to lend a hand, and in no time Harald and Jonathan stepped up to fill the gap and do an impromptu KDE Development Intro and Q+A session. In there they gave an overview on the essentials every prospective KDE developer should know and answered in detail the questions in the audience. All in all a great insight on how to get started developing KDE apps.

Check out the session log here.

Thunderbird + Unity = Awesome, and how JSCtypes lets you get to the candy

By Mike Conley

Mike has been working over the last 3 months at Mozilla on ways in which Thunderbird can integrate nicely into Ubuntu, in particular with Unity. He started explaining the main points he’s been focusing on: the messaging menu, the Unity launcher adn Ubuntu One, and for the rest of the session he covered the first two. Going straight to the subject, the next topic was to explain what a Thunderbird extension is, and how they are written using a mixture of Javascript, the XUL mark-up language and CSS, all executed by the Gecko engine. He then introduced JS-CTypes, which allow developers to access C libraries directly from Chrome-level Javascript code. and how he used them to write a Unity launcher add-on. the resto of the session focused on this subject, with plenty of code examples.

Check out the session log here.

STORY: Unity, hacking on a real-world app

By Marco Trevisan

The last session of the day was one of my favourite ones: an inspiring personal story. Marco is a community contributor to Unity who told us about his journey since he found an application itch to scratch and until his own feature was landed. He started with a very easy to understand overview of the Unity architecture and how all the pieces fit together, following with the story on how he found something that needed improvement and how he went about fixing it: indicator-sound not being precise when setting the volume with the mouse wheel. Do read it, as it is going to be a great help to all of you who are looking on how to get started contributing to Ubuntu development.

Check out the session log here.

The Day Ahead: Upcoming Sessions for Day 3

A quick look at today’s session lineup for your development pleasure:

16:00 UTC
Qt Quick: QML the Language – Jürgen Bocklage-Ryannel
Here’s a special treat for anyone interested in Qt development: Jürgen Bocklage-Ryannel, from Nokia, the maker of Qt, will be introducing Qt Quick and QML as the language used in Qt Quick. He’ll be showing some elements of the UI and the general process, and tell you the right places to go to to get more information.

17:00 UTC
Make your applications work in the cloud with Ubuntu OneStuart Langridge
Who else than the Ubuntu One mastermind himself could tell you better about supercharging your apps with cloud functionality? Join Stuart in this talk where he’ll be describing how to integrate Ubuntu One into your applications and bring your users to cloud 9 ;)

18:00 UTC
Take control of your desktop easily with DBusAlejandro J. Cura
D-Bus, the cross-desktop message bus system, is becoming more and more ubiquitous in any Free Software distribution. You can bring your applications to a whole new level letting them talk to other ones in a desktop session, and Alejandro can tell you exactly how to do that.

19:00 UTC
Touchégg: Bringing Multitouch Gestures to your DesktopJosé Expósito
It’s always great to see real-world examples of how the newest and coolest technologies are being used. José will be showcasing his multitouch-based application, Touchégg, introducing its features, describing how to add new multitouch gestures, the technologies used to develop it, and how it uses the uTouch-GEIS API. Check out the summary and the logs from the other Multitouch session on Monday to learn more.

20:00 UTC
Unity: Integrating with Launcher and PlacesMikkel Kamstrup Erlandsen
Do you want your application to seamlessly blend into the new Ubuntu user interface experience? Do you want it to provide all interaction capabilities that Unity provides? Then join Unity developer Mikkel Kamstrup in his walkthrough with examples on how to plug your app into the Launcher and Places API.

21:00 UTC
Tracking Source Code History with BazaarJelmer Vernooij
Learn how to control the history of your source code with a distributed and modern revision control system. Bazaar is powerful, fast, and most importantly, easy and fun to use. Jelmer has had a lot to do in developing Bazaar, so he knows well what he’s talking about. Join him in this session where he’ll tell you the basics and more sophisticated uses of the revision control system used to develop Ubuntu and thousands of other projects in Launchpad.

Looking forward to seeing you all there in a few hours!


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David

Unity

We all know about Unity, the project that is changing the way we interact with our computer by bringing a consistent user experience and a solid, elegant design for desktop and netbook users.

We want to make sure Unity is for everyone, and one of the key aspects to make it possible is that it is available in everyone’s language.

Unity is already available in more than 60 languages, and can be translated into almost any other. Unity is also Free Software, which means it is in your own hands to make it happen.

So, if your language is not in that list, how can you translate Unity?

  • If you are new to translations, you might want to read the Ubuntu Translations Quickstart Guide.
  • Next thing you can do is go to the Unity translations page and start translating online right away.
  • You can then do the same with the Applications and Files places and translate them as well.
  • That’s it! You’ll find that contributing to Ubuntu by translating it is one of the easiest and most rewarding ways you can start

If you’ve got any questions, you can contact the translations team in whichever way you prefer.

We’ve got about 150 Ubuntu translation teams, and I’m pretty sure we can make that by the time Ubuntu Natty Narwhal is released there is a translation from each one of these teams.

Hence, I’m proud to announce the Unity L10N project, stay tuned for more updates and join the translation party!


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