Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'ubuntu'

David Planella

Over a week ago, we announced the Ubuntu Scope Showdown: a competition to write a scope for Ubuntu on phones in 5 weeks and win exciting prizes.

Scopes are Ubuntu’s innovative take at revolutionizing the content and services experience. For users, they provide quick and intuitive access to content without the need of loading an app. For developers and operators, scopes provide an easy path to surface their content and customize the UX in a way that is very flexible and integrated.

After the initial contest kickoff, we’ve already had a number of participants blogging, sharing updates and teasers about their work. Here’s a peek at some of their progress.

A variety of scopes

In the words of Robert Schroll, of Beru fame, e-mail apps are just passé. So much that he decided to explore an interesting concept: reading your e-mail with a scope. With a nice extra touch: Ubuntu Online accounts integration.

 Because e-mail apps are so 90s - the Gmail scope


Because e-mail apps are so 90s – the Gmail scope

After listening to one of Daniel Holbach’s mixes, Bogdan Cuza thought they alone deserve a scope, and so the Mixcloud scope was born. The rest, as they say, is history.

Can't get enough of those Balkan Beats - the Mixcloud scope

Can’t get enough of those Balkan Beats – the Mixcloud scope

You don’t know where to eat tonight? No worries, Sam Segers has you covered. Check out his Google places scope to easily find somewhere new to go.

Your cooking skills not up to your date's expectations? The Google places scope comes to the rescue

Your cooking skills not up to your date’s expectations? The Google places scope comes to the rescue

Developer Dan has a treat for all of us movie lovers: the Cinema scope. Features categories and departments, with settings, TV series and genres coming up soon! Check out the details on his blog.

Helping Ubuntu users see what stuff dreams are made of since 2014 - the Cinema scope

Helping Ubuntu users watch stuff dreams are made of since 2014 – the Cinema scope

Riccardo Padovani is bringing the dark horse -or well, duck?- of search engines into Ubuntu. Armed with the DuckDuckGo scope, get results like a pro with “real privacy, smarter search and less clutter”.

Duck is the new black - the DuckDuckGo scope

Duck is the new black – the DuckDuckGo scope

A wishlist of scopes

As Alan Pope and Michael Hall, I do have my wishlist of scopes for content that I’d like to have accessible at a flick of the finger on my phone. Maybe someone of you can make our day?

  • 8tracks scope: I love music, and I love mixes. 8tracks is a music streaming service to listen to the mixes their community members create and to get creative submitting mixes. As an avid mixer and listener, I’d be using this all of the time, especially if it came with Online Accounts integration that showed me content relevant to my interests.
  • Ask Ubuntu scope: the biggest Ubuntu Q&A site. I regularly check the ‘application-development‘ tag there to see any new questions and if I can help a fellow Ubuntu developer (and you should too). It’d be absolutely awesome to get those updates easily on my phone screen, with settings to filter on tags and the ability to upvote/downvote questions and answers.

Not sure what to write a scope for yet? Well, check out the ideas over at the Showdown reddit, or let your imagination run wild with a comprehensive list of APIs to get more inspiration!

A prize for your scopes

It’s not too late to enter the Showdown, you too can write a scope and win prizes! Here are some tips to get started:

Looking forward to seeing the next batch of scopes participants come up with!

The post The Ubuntu Scope Showdown – progress showcase appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

As part of the Ubuntu App Developer Week, I just ran a live on-air session on how to internationalize your Ubuntu apps. Some of the participants on the live chat asked me if I could share the slides somewhere online.

So here they are for your viewing pleasure :) If you’ve got any questions on i18n or in Ubuntu app development in general, feel free to ask in the comments or ping me (dpm) on IRC.

The video

The slides

Enjoy!

The post Internationalizing your apps at the Ubuntu App Developer Week appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

A sample of the wider Ubuntu Community team, with Canonicalers and volunteer core app developers

A sample of the wider Ubuntu Community team, with Canonicalers and volunteer core app developers

After the recent news of Jono stepping down as the Ubuntu Community Manager to seek new challenges at XPRIZE, a new era in Ubuntu begins. Jono’s leadership, passion and drive to continually push the boundaries have been contagious over the years, and have been the catalyst for growing the unique community of individuals that defines Ubuntu today.

Jono is now joining the ranks of non-Canonical Ubuntu members, and while this will change the angle of participation, I’m certain that it won’t change his energy and dedication one bit. But most importantly, it’s a testament to his work that his former team will continue to thrive and take up the torch in pushing those boundaries.

For us, it will be business as usual in the sense of implementing our roadmap, continuing to grow a strong and open community, being innovative in how we do it, and coordinating the logistics around our plans. So not much will be different in that regard, but obviously some organizational bits will change.

As part of the transition, the Ubuntu Community Team at Canonical in full, that is, Michael Hall, Daniel Holbach, Alan Pope, Nicholas Skaggs and myself, will now be hosting the weekly Ubuntu Q&A, starting today at 18:00 UTC on Ubuntu On Air (click here for the time at your location).

The Ubuntu Community Team Q&A

Openness, both in being a transparent and welcoming community, is one of the core values of Ubuntu, and we believe the channels should be always open for a healthy information flow and to help contributors get involved.

As such, the Ubuntu Community Team Q&A will continue to provide a weekly, 1-hour-long session open for participation to anyone who wants to ask their questions about Ubuntu. In fact, as in former editions, you can ask the Community Team just anything about Free Software, Technology, or whatever you come up with. As before, the only questions we won’t answer are those related to technical support, where you’ll be much better served using Ask Ubuntu, the Ubuntu forums or IRC.

Join the Ubuntu Community Team Q&A at 18:00 UTC today and ask your questions >

The Ubuntu Online Summit is coming soon!

Also, following the thread of events and participation, the new Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS) is coming up very soon, and it’s an excellent opportunity to learn about getting involved in Ubuntu, organizing or presenting the plans of the different Ubuntu teams for the next months.

UOS will be held on June 10th – 12th and it will be a combination of the former Ubuntu Developer Summit and the more user-facing events we’ve been organizing in the past. This opens the door to a wider audience that can follow a richer mix of developer and user or contributor content.

If you want to learn about the details, check out Michael’s UOS post on how it’s going to work. If you want to contribute and make a difference in Ubuntu, do register a session too!

Looking forward to seeing you soon!

The post A new era for the Ubuntu community team, or business as usual appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

Ubuntu emulator guide

Following the initial announcement, the Ubuntu emulator is going to become a primary Engineering platform for development. Quoting Alexander Sack, when ready, the goal is to

[…] start using the emulator for everything you usually would do on the phone. We really want to make the emulator a class A engineering platform for everyone

While the final emulator is still work in progress, we’re continually seeing the improvements in finishing all the pieces to make it a first-class citizen for development, both for the platform itself and for app developers. However, as it stands today, the emulator is already functional, so I’ve decided to prepare a quickstart guide to highlight the great work the Foundations and Phonedations teams (along with many other contributors) are producing to make it possible.

While you should consider this as guide as a preview, you can already use it to start getting familiar with the emulator for testing, platform development and writing apps.

Requirements

To install and run the Ubuntu emulator, you will need:

  • Ubuntu 14.04 or later (see installation notes for older versions)
  • 512MB of RAM dedicated to the emulator
  • 4GB of disk space
  • OpenGL-capable desktop drivers (most graphics drivers/cards are)

Installing the emulator

If you are using Ubuntu 14.04, installation is as easy as opening a terminal, pressing Ctrl+Alt+T and running these commands, followed by Enter:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-sdk-team/ppa && sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install ubuntu-emulator

Alternatively, if you are running an older stable release such as Ubuntu 12.04, you can install the emulator by manually downloading its packages first:

Show me how

  1. Create a folder named MARKDOWN_HASHb3eeabb8ee11c2be770b684d95219ecbMARKDOWN_HASH in your home directory
  2. Go to the goget-ubuntu-touch packages page in Launchpad
  3. Scroll down to Trusty Tahr and click on the arrow to the left to expand it
  4. Scroll further to the bottom of the page and click on the MARKDOWN_HASH05556613978ce6821766bb234e2ff0f2MARKDOWN_HASH package corresponding to your architecture (i386 or amd64) to download in the MARKDOWN_HASH1e681dc9c2bfe6538971553668079349MARKDOWN_HASH folder you created
  5. Now go to the Android packages page in Launchpad
  6. Scroll down to Trusty Tahr and click on the arrow to the left to expand it
  7. Scroll further to the bottom of the page and click on the MARKDOWN_HASH1843750ed619186a2ce7bdabba6f8062MARKDOWN_HASH package corresponding to download it at the same MARKDOWN_HASH1e681dc9c2bfe6538971553668079349MARKDOWN_HASH folder
  8. Open a terminal with Ctrl+Alt+T
  9. Change the directory to the location where you downloaded the package writing the following command in the terminal: MARKDOWN_HASH8844018ed0ccc8c506d6aff82c62c46fMARKDOWN_HASH
  10. Then run this command to install the packages: MARKDOWN_HASH0452d2d16235c62b87fd735e6496c661MARKDOWN_HASH
  11. Once the installation is successful you can close the terminal and remove the MARKDOWN_HASH1e681dc9c2bfe6538971553668079349MARKDOWN_HASH folder and its contents

Installation notes

  • Downloaded images are cached at ~/.cache/ubuntuimage –using the standard XDG_CACHE_DIR location.
  • Instances are stored at ~/.local/share/ubuntu-emulator –using the standard XDG_DATA_DIR location.
  • While an image upgrade feature is in the works, for now you can simply create an instance of a newer image over the previous one.

Running the emulator

Ubuntu emulator guide

The ubuntu-emulator tool makes it again really easy to manage instances and run the emulator. Typically, you’ll be opening a terminal and running these commands the first time you create an instance (where myinstance is the name you’ve chosen for it):

sudo ubuntu-emulator create myinstance --arch=i386
ubuntu-emulator run myinstance

You can create any instances you need for different purposes. And once the instance has been created, you’ll be generally using the ubuntu-emulator run myinstance command to start an emulator session based on that instance.

Notice how in the command above the --arch parameter was specified to override the default architecture (armhf). Using the i386 arch will make the emulator run at a (much faster) native speed.

Other parameters you might want to experiment with are also: --scale=0.7 and --memory=720. In these examples, we’re scaling down the UI to be 70% of the original size (useful for smaller screens) and specifying a maximum of 720MB for the emulator to use (on systems with memory to spare).

There are 3 main elements you’ll be interacting with when running the emulator:

  • The phone UI – this is the visual part of the emulator, where you can interact with the UI in the same way you’d do it with a phone. You can use your mouse to simulate taps and slides. Bonus points if you can recognize the phone model where the UI is in ;)
  • The remote session on the terminal – upon starting the emulator, a terminal will also be launched alongside. Use the phablet username and the same password to log in to an interactive ADB session on the emulator. You can also launch other terminal sessions using other communication protocols –see the link at the end of this guide for more details.
  • The ubuntu-emulator tool – with this CLI tool, you can manage the lifetime and runtime of Ubuntu images. Common subcommands of ubuntu-emulator include create (to create new instances), destroy (to destroy existing instances), run (as we’ve already seen, to run instances), snapshot (to create and restore snapshots of a given point in time) and more. Use ubuntu-emulator --help to learn about these commands and ubuntu-emulator command --help to learn more about a particular command and its options.

Runtime notes

  • Make sure you’ve got enough space to install the emulator and create new instances, otherwise the operation will fail (or take a long time) without warning.
  • At this time, the emulator takes a while to load for the first time. During that time, you’ll see a black screen inside the phone skin. Just wait a bit until it’s finished loading and the welcome screen appears.
  • By default the latest built image from the devel-proposed channel is used. This can be changed during creation with the --channel and --revision options.
  • If your host has a network connection, the emulator will use that transparently, even though the network indicator might show otherwise.
  • To talk to the emulator, you can use standard adb. The emulator should appear under the list of the adb devices command.

Learn more and contribute

I hope this guide has whetted your appetite to start testing the emulator! You can also contribute making the emulator a first-class target for Ubuntu development. The easiest way is to install it and give it ago. If something is not working you can then file a bug.

If you want to fix a bug yourself or contribute to code, the best thing is to ask the developers about how to get started by subscribing to the Ubuntu phone mailing list.

If you want to learn more about the emulator, including how to create instance snapshots and other cool features, head out to the Ubuntu Emulator wiki page.

And next… support for the tablet form factor and SDK integration. Can’t wait for those features to land!

The post A quickstart guide to the Ubuntu emulator appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

Ubuntu, the human touch
Ubuntu, el sistema operatiu lliure més popular i innovador en núvols computacionals, en servidors i en milions d’ordinadors personals, entra al món dels dispositius mòbils. Després d’anunciar la versió per a mòbils i tauletes en l’anterior edició, l’Ubuntu, patrocinat per l’empresa Canonical, torna al Mobile World Congress a Barcelona. Aquest cop amb més força, més novetats i a punt de presentar la que en serà la versió nova: 14.04 LTS.

Ubuntu és molt més que una plataforma: és un projecte obert que disposa d’una extensa comunitat d’usuaris, desenvolupadors i voluntaris que s’agrupen en equips locals arreu del món per col·laborar-hi i promocionar-lo.

Aprofitant la celebració del Mobile World Congress, el dissabte 1 de març l’equip català de l’Ubuntu organitza la primera Escola d’aplicacions Ubuntu a Barcelona, un esdeveniment gratuït on es presentaran amb detall els conceptes de disseny i d’arquitectura de l’Ubuntu en mòbils i tauletes. Per completar la jornada, els participants aprendran a crear diferents tipus d’aplicacions per a l’Ubuntu en el taller de desenvolupament d’aplicacions natives i web.

Contingut de la jornada

Fonaments de la plataforma Ubuntu
11:00 – 11:55 Fonaments: la plataforma Ubuntu
12:05 – 13:00 Fonaments: l’Ubuntu SDK com a entorn de desenvolupament

Taller de creació d’aplicacions
15:00 – 15:55 Aplicacions: el model d’aplicació i aplicacions natives
16:05 – 17:00 Aplicacions: aplicacions web i publicació d’aplicacions

L’Escola d’aplicacions Ubuntu està dirigida a desenvolupadors i usuaris amb perfil tècnic, per la qual cosa s’assumeixen uns coneixements mínims de programació.

Es recomana dur un portàtil amb Ubuntu 12.04 o superior, tot i que és possible participar amb altres sistemes a través d’una imatge virtual que es proporcionarà en el taller. Aquells participants que duguin un dispositiu Nexus 4, Nexus 7 (razor) o Nexus 10 tindran l’opció d’instal·lar l’Ubuntu com a sistema únic o bé com a arrencada dual.

Quan i on

MOB
Escola d’aplicacions Ubuntu
Ponent: David Planella (Canonical)
Data: dissabte 1 de març de 2014
Lloc:
MOB (Makers Of Barcelona)
C/ Bailén 11, baixos
08010 Barcelona

Organitza: www.ubuntu.cat

Registreu-vos!

La jornada és gratuïta, amb places limitades a 40 participants.

Registreu-vos en línia per participar-hi >

The post Escola d’aplicacions Ubuntu a Barcelona appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

App-Dev-Schools

Following the call for volunteers to organize App Dev Schools across the globe, we’re excited to say that there are already events planned in 3 different countries. Every single App Dev School will help growing our community of app developers and drive adoption of our favourite free OS on all devices, everywhere.

Our LoCo community has got an incredible track record for organizing release parties, Ubuntu Hours, Global Jams, and all sorts of meet-ups for Ubuntu enthusiasts and folks who are new to Ubuntu. Ubuntu App Developer Schools are very new, but in the same way LoCos are, they’re going to become crucial in the new era of mobile devices and convergence. So we would like to see more of them and we need your help!

You can run an App Dev School too

If you’ve already organized an event, you already know the drill, but if it’s your first one, here are some guidelines on how you can put one together:

  1. Find a place to run an event and pick a date when to run it.
  2. Find some other folks in your LoCo who would be interested in helping.
  3. To promote it, remember to add it to the LoCo Directory
  4. Get the material and tune it for your event if needed.
  5. Promote the event locally and encourage people to join.
  6. Practice the material a few times before the big day, then show up, run the class and have fun.
  7. Take lots of pictures!

The ever awesome José Antonio Rey has made it even easier for Spanish-speaking LoCos to run events by having translated the materials into Spanish, so do get in touch with him if you’d like to use them.

And finally, for those of you who don’t have mobile devices to show Ubuntu on, the emulator is a nice alternative to use for app development and presentations. To help you get started, I’ve put together a quickstart guide to the Ubuntu emulator.

If you’re thinking about organizing one and you’ve got questions or need help, get in touch with me at david.planella@ubuntu.com

Looking forward to seeing all your App Dev Schools around the world!

The post Announcing the first Ubuntu App Dev Schools appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

Ubuntu Core Apps Hack Days

Core Apps Hack days are an easy way for app developers to get started contributing to one of the most important and visible parts of Ubuntu, and learn and share knowledge with an exciting community of some of the best Open Source developers around. As core app developer Riccardo Padovani, puts it:

I started to contribute to Ubuntu Touch with a Core App Hack Day in July and I still have not stopped!

Driven by the success of previous editions, we’re thrilled to announce another week of Ubuntu Core Apps Hack Days starting tomorrow, Friday the 24th of January

The goals

In one month’s time, the Mobile World Congress will bring a unique opportunity to present the Ubuntu phone and tablet to some of the most influential names in the mobile industry. It is also an opportunity to showcase a truly free OS and the stunning work our community of core app developers (and many others!) have already achieved.

Thus we’d like to set the theme for these Hack Days to Sprinting to MWC, and use them to focus on convergence and finishing off the set of features agreed upon at the last Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS).

The schedule

We’ll be running a week’s worth of Hack Days, online at the #ubuntu-app-devel IRC channel, from 9:00UTC to 21:00UTC, focusing on two apps a day:

Get involved

There are many ways to making core apps even more awesome! If you want to contribute, choose the one that best matches your interests or skills. The first thing I’d recommend would be to run the apps on a device to get a feel for how they work. If you don’t have a real device to test, a good alternative is to use the Ubuntu emulator.

Once you’re familiar with them, here’s how you can start your journey to becoming a core apps contributor:

  1. Join the #ubuntu-app-devel IRC channel and say hi! >
  2. Find something to work on or ask someone on the channel. Here are some examples to get started

To learn more about contributing, check out the Hack Days page >.

Looking forward to seeing the new faces in the core apps project!

The post The Ubuntu Core Apps Hack Days are back! appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

Human Touch-700px

It’s going to be one of the most exciting years in the history of Ubuntu. We’re seeing innovation and stunning work across the board, and a huge momentum and interest from OEMs and carriers to ship a phone with Ubuntu, with already a confirmed partner.

With our favourite OS expanding to yet another order of magnitude, every contribution is becoming even more important. And with phones shipping all over the globe, multilingual support and Ubuntu translators are going to be one of the keys to Ubuntu’s success.

In the same way you’ve helped us bring an excellent localized experience to the desktop throughout the years, we now need your help ensuring the phone reaches that level of excellence too. Once more, you can bring Ubuntu on phones to millions in their language.

To make it easier to focus on the most important parts, here’s a summary of the main Ubuntu components that can be translated in Launchpad, our collaborative translation tool.

And if you’re new to translating Ubuntu, you can also help! Check out our Translations Quickstart guide >

Unity and scopes

Unity is essentially Ubuntu’s UI, and version 8 is what is currently running on the phone and will ultimately run on all form factors once we achieve full convergence.

By translating Unity, the most visible user interface parts will appear in your language. Scopes are also part of Unity, and enable bringing content to users in a natural and organized way. The Click Update Manager is launched in the Applications scope when you install a new app.

Indicators

Indicators are another Unity technology that enables quick access to system settings that you access every day, such as networking, location, sound, etc., as well as the messaging menu. Translating indicators will localize their menus when you swipe from the top edge.

Core and system apps

You can think of core and system apps as being the same thing: a set the essential apps every user would expect preinstalled on their devices. Translating core apps, you’ll make it possible to have a richer localized experience with clock, camera, weather, calculator and more.

Testing translations

With the addition of multiple supported form factors, testing is important not only to ensure that translations are correct, but also that they fit in UI components of different widths. So please double-check that long texts fit in in the smaller factors such as the phone.

Translation testing on a running phone or on the emulator deserves an article of its own, so please stay tuned for the next update coming soon.

Happy translating!

Image: Human touch, by David Planella, under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license

The post Make Ubuntu speak your language appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

Ubuntu loves Evernote

We’ve been making good progress with Reminders, the Ubuntu app powered by Evernote. While our team of developers have been busy working on the UI, a set of other equally awesome individuals have been working in parallel to implement the backend pieces.

Today, I’m thrilled to announce that the Evernote Online Accounts provider is now available for Ubuntu as a preview. This plugin enables secure login to Evernote via OAuth, and handles the authentication process via the standard Ubuntu platform APIs, so that the Reminders app does not even have to care about the logic.

Big thanks to Alberto Mardegan and Chris Wayne for making this possible.

For developers only

At this point, the authentication plugin is provided for the purpose of developing the Reminders app only, and it will intentionally not work with regular Evernote accounts. Support for regular Evernote accounts will be enabled when the Reminders app reaches the stable release status.

The plugin talks to the Evernote sandbox service, so before using it you’ll need to create a developer account there first. Create a free Evernote developer account ›

Installing the Evernote account provider

As the required packages have not yet landed in the archive, we’ll need to install them from the core apps repository. You can open a terminal and run these commands to do the installation, either on the phone or on the desktop:

On the phone, before you can install a package you will need to switch to RW mode

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-touch-coreapps-drivers/daily
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install account-plugin-evernote signon-plugin-oauth2

Logging into the Evernote sandbox

Evernote Account

The next step in using the plugin is to log into the Evernote sandbox. The Evernote login process, as for any other Ubuntu online account, takes place in the System Settings app. Once the plugin is installed, you’ll be able to add new Evernote accounts from the New Account screen. While the screenshots above show how to do it on the phone, this works equally well on the desktop.

Using the Evernote account provider

To enable Evernote account support in QML apps, you’ll only require an instance of the Ubuntu Online Accounts AccountServiceModel. You should check out the online API reference for more information, but in essence, an adapted version of the snippet from the documentation will do the trick:

Item {
    AccountServiceModel {
        id: accounts
        // Use the Evernote service
        service: "evernote"
    }
    ListView {
        model: accounts
        delegate: Rectangle {
            id: rect
            Text { text: rect.model.displayName }
            AccountService {
                id: accountService
                objectHandle: rect.model.accountServiceHandle
                // Print the access token on the console
                onAuthenticated: { console.log("Access token is " + reply.AccessToken) }
                onAuthenticationError: { console.log("Authentication failed, code " + error.code) }
            }
            MouseArea {
                anchors.fill: parent
                onClicked: accountService.authenticate()
            }
        }
    }
}

With this code, you’ll get your Evernote account listed in the UI. Clicking on it, and upon successful authentication you’ll obtain an Evernote authentication token, that can then be passed to the Evernote API to access the NoteStore and manage notes for the account associated to that token.

This is however the first step, as you’ll need a working backend to pass that token to and to talk to the Evernote API before you can manage any notes. Read on to learn more on this.

Setting up the Evernote API Taskforce

The next phase in the project is now to focus on the creation a QML plugin that will talk to the Evernote service. This is a key piece of the infrastructure that will enable performing the essential operations of fetching, modifying and updating notes while online.

The unstoppable Michael Zanetti has been helping us bootstrapping the process, and he’s already put together an Evernote API QML plugin that performs the basic communication with the Evernote servers.

Taking this work as a foundation, we want to extend the plugin to perform all necessary operations to cover the needs of the Reminders app. With this goal in mind, we’re putting together the Evernote API taskforce: a team of developers tightly focused in developing the Evernote API QML plugin and working very closely with the Reminders app developers to ensure backend and UI perfectly fit.

So if you’ve got Qt and C++ experience, this is a call for you: join the team of core developers who bring Evernote support to Ubuntu and millions of users!

If you’re interested in participating, let us know in the comments or or drop us an e-mail on the Core Apps mailing list.

Looking forward to welcoming new developers to the team, and stay tuned for more updates!

The post Ubuntu Reminders app gets Evernote authentication appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

Ubuntu French LoCo Team

The challenge

With Ubuntu now running across all form factors and devices and entering the mobile space, a new era begins. While our values remain the same, we’ve now faced with a unique opportunity to drive adoption of our favourite Free Software OS to a user base that could potentially be one or two orders of magnitude bigger.

We’ve layed out the foundations of an innovative and scalable platform that provides a stunning experience for regular and power users, and that is a delight for developers to use. Years of experience, user testing and design on the desktop, pioneering work on the cloud and the app development story for the phone are some of the key aspects that have made it possible.

In this new era our community is more important than ever, with LoCo teams and the LoCo Council at the forefront. Ubuntu contributors, enthusiasts, evangelists, advocates… with your events, initiatives across the globe you are all making it happen.

With virtual UDS happening this week, we’d like to kick off a series of discussions to come up with a solid plan on how to re-energize and empower LoCo teams to scale up to these new challenges, and to involve them in the technologies and projects that are driving this new chapter in Ubuntu. The contribution of leaders in our LoCo community and the LoCo Council will be key to our success here.

The sessions

From the 19th to 21th of November, both the Community and the App Development tracks at UDS will be full with LoCo team sessions, and we’d like all advocates and everyone involved in Ubuntu local community teams to participate and contribute to our LoCo plans this cycle. Here are the sessions this week:

LoCo projects

An initiative to work with LoCos to provide projects and outcomes for those teams and individuals looking for ways of contributing to Ubuntu. We’d like to create “LoCo projects”, a pool of projects LoCo teams can participate in as a team.

LoCo Portal promotion

The LoCo Portal is the window to the vibrant activity of our Ubuntu teams, and we want to come up with a plan to promote it and use it to highlight the awesome work that’s going on in the LoCo world.

Join this session >

LoCo Leadership growth

New challenges require leadership, and we’d like to work with the LoCo Council to grow a team of leaders to drive the global LoCo community.

Join this session >

LoCo community involvement in App Development

App development is an exciting new area that is becoming key to the success of Ubuntu among mobile users. We’re at a point where the platform and infrastructure is ripe for LoCo teams to get involved and start spreading the word and running Ubuntu app development events.

Join this session >

Build materials for the App Dev Schools initiative

Growing the number of learning materials to write apps for Ubuntu will be a key focus for next cycle, and it offers a great opportunity to share knowledge and help others getting started creating content for the platform. Join us to discuss the plan to create a set of materials and presentations for the App Dev Schools.

Join this session >

Campaign to grow the number of tutorials videos

As an extension to the App Dev Schools initiative, we’d like to come up with a plan to publish a series of short, topic-based app development tutorial videos.

Join this session >

Looking forward to seeing you all at UDS this week!

Image ‘Photo de grouple’ by rocknpol under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

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David Planella

qreator-square

We’re preparing a new release of Qreator, the QR code creator for Ubuntu, to be published in the next few days.

This release adds a few new strings and quite a bunch of new features, including a new design, new QR codes, and the ability to edit the QR codes you create.

Kudos to everyone who has contributed translations in the past: thanks to you the development release Qreator is already fully translated in 10 languages. There are other 26 languages that are nearly completed and are only missing the newly-added strings. A very special mention goes also to the unstoppable Stefan Schwarzburg, whose contributions have been invaluable in putting the upcoming release together.

If you find it useful, please help translating and making it available in your language here:

Translate Qreator!

To get more context for the translation, you can also install the preview package. It’s for Ubuntu 13.04 only, but if someone needs an older version, let me know and I can create it too.

Thanks!

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I’m thrilled to announce the availability of the Ubuntu 12.04 Online Tour for local community teams to localize and use on their websites. The tour has been the result of the stunning work done by Ant Dillon from the Canonical Web Design Team and should provide a web-based first impression of Ubuntu to new users, now in their language.

It’s a great opportunity to showcase Ubuntu to your local community to celebrate release day tomorrow.

Where is it?

How can I use it for my LoCo website?

First of all, you’ll need to get set up with the right tools before you start.

Getting set up:

  • Bazaar revision control system Install bzr
  • Polib library Install polib
  • Terminal. You’ll need to run the commands below on a terminal. Simply press Ctrl+Alt+T to fire up a new terminal console.

If you’ve already translated the tour in Launchpad, you can build a localized version in 3 easy steps:

1. Get the code:

bzr branch lp:ubuntu-online-tour/12.04

2. Build the localized tour:

cd 12.04
cd translate-html/bin
./translate-html -t

3. Deploy the tour:

  • This will vary depending on your setup, so simply make sure you copy the chromeless, css, img, js, pie and videos folders along with the videoplayer.swf file to your site. In addition, you will need the en folder and the folder for your language created in the previous step.

If you haven’t finished the translation for your language in Launchpad, you will need to complete the corresponding PO file before you run step 2. Just ask on the Ubuntu translators mailing list or on Launchpad in case you need help or are not familiar with PO files.

For any issues, suggestions or enhancement, use the Online Tour’s Launchpad project to report bugs or submit improvements.

Enjoy!

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If you follow the Ubuntu channels, and unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ll have noticed that this coming weekend we’re organizing the Ubuntu Global Jam, a worldwide event where Ubuntu local community teams (LoCos) join in a get-together fest to have some fun while improving Ubuntu.

As we’re ramping up to a Long Term Support release, this is a particularly important UGJ and we need all hands on deck to ensure that it does not only meet, but exceeds the high quality standard of previous Ubuntu LTS releases. This is another article in the series of blog posts showcasing the events our community is organizing, brought to you by Rafael Carreras, from the Ubuntu Catalan LoCo team.

Tell us a bit about your LoCo team

Our LoCo is language-oriented, and by language I mean Catalan (a Romanic one), not Perl or Python. In fact, the Catalan LoCo Team was the first language-oriented LoCo to be approved back in 2007. We manage our day-to-day in three mailing lists: technical doubts, team work and translations and do IRC meetings twice a month. We organise Ubuntu Global Jam events every 6 months (with some minor absences) and of course great release parties every 6 months along with some other little ones in between.

What kind of event are you organizing for this Ubuntu Global Jam?

As always, we will translate some new packages, discuss translation items, a bug triage session, some install release work and even evangelization to some passing people, as we organise UGJ this time in a civic centre.

Is this the first UGJ event you’re organizing?

No, it’s not, we are running UGJs since the first one and I think we only missed last one.

How do you think UGJ events help the Ubuntu community and Ubuntu?

It’s a great opportunity for meeting people you only know by email or chat. Also, as we sit down together, there is little room for procrastination. Well, more or less, anyway.

Why do you think Jono Bacon always features pictures of the Catalan team when announcing the UGJ? Are we the most good-looking LoCo?

Yeah, definitely. It must be that.

Join the party by registering your event at the Ubuntu LoCo Portal!

p1010458 by Alex Muntada

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Docs jam

It’s Community Docs Jam today!

We want to fix the www.ubuntu.com/community page to better represent our community, and who better than our community to help providing that content?

So join us today, pick an area where you’re interested and give us a hand adding content. Join the Ubuntu Community Docs Jam ›

Image: Binded Document CC-BY 2.0 by Sean MacEntee

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Documents

It’s Community Docs Jam today!

We want to fix the www.ubuntu.com/community page to better represent our community, and who better than our community to help providing that content?

So join us today, pick an area where you’re interested and give us a hand adding content. Join the Ubuntu Community Docs Jam ›

Image: Binded Document CC-BY 2.0 by Sean MacEntee


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David Planella

Just a quick reminder that I’ll be running a Workshop for the Ubuntu App Showdown in very few minutes. Update: the video is now live!

I’ll be talking about Qreator, an application I developed for quick creation of QR codes from the desktop. The idea is to explain how I put it together in order to help new app developers with an example where they can learn from and ask questions about.

So feel free to join me on the live feed, learn more and ask your questions.

If you cannot follow it live, you can also see the recording at your own time later on.

See you there in a bit!

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I am pleased to announce that our current development release, Ubuntu Precise, is now open for translation:

Translate Ubuntu!

Translate Ubuntu Oneiric!

Some additional information that will be useful for translators:

  • Translation schedule. Remember that according to the release schedule translatable messages might be subject to change until the User Interface Freeze on the week of the 23rd of February.
  • Language packs. During the development cycle, language packs containing translations will be released twice per week except for the freeze periods. This will allow users and translators to quickly see and test the results of translations.
  • Test and report bugs. If you notice any issues (e.g. untranslated strings or applications), do check with the translation team for your language first. If you think it is a genuine bug, please report it.
  • Learn more. Learn how to start translating Ubuntu and enable millions to use it in their language.

Ubuntu 12.04 will be a Long Term Support release, so let’s rally around translations to provide the best translated OS around and go over the mark of nearly 40 languages in which Ubuntu is fully translated!

open image by loop_oh – License: CC by-nd 2.0

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Ubuntu Global Jam Q+A Videocasts today!

Ubuntu Global Jam Q+A VideocastIn preparation for the Ubuntu Global Jam event next weekend, Jono and I will be running Q+A videocasts today

Jono’s videocast will be more convenient for the Americas and in the evening in Europe:

My videocast coming up in about 2 hours time and is more convenient for Europe and surrounding areas:

So if you are either thinking of organizing an event, you’re already organizing one, you’d like to participate in one, or simply want to learn more, do come along, ask your questions and have some fun!

Oh, and you should also check out the video about rolling your own event:

Can’t see it? Watch it here!

This Global Jam is going to be awesome, and it’s going to give that extra push to make Ubuntu 12.04 even a more rock-solid release. Have you already signed up for an event?

To ask your questions on the chat, you’ll need to sign up for a ustream account (it’s free, doesn’t take more than a couple of minutes and you can use your Launchpad OpenId), but I’ll also be answering your questions on the #ubuntu-locoteams IRC channel on Freenode.

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Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ll have noticed that this coming weekend we’re organizing the Ubuntu Global Jam, a worldwide event where Ubuntu local community teams (LoCos) join in a get-together fest to have some fun while improving Ubuntu. As we’re ramping up to a Long Term Support release, this is a particularly important UGJ and we need every hand on deck to ensure it not only meets but exceeds the standard of previous Ubuntu LTS releases. This is another article in the series of blog posts showcasing the events our community is organizing, brought to you by Andrej Znidarsic, from the Ubuntu Slovenian LoCo team.

Tell us a bit about your LoCo team

The Slovenian Ubuntu LoCo team was founded in 2005 and we try to spread Ubuntu mainly by translation work and help and support to Slovenian Ubuntu users who don’t have the means (either language or technical knowledger barrier) to solve problems themselves. Slovenian has been among the top translated languages for a while, which is quite impressive considering there are only 2 million native speakers and we don’t have a big pool to get translators from. We operate an IRC channel, website, forum, Facebook, Twitter and Google+ page. Offline we meet at monthly Ubuntu hours and we do Global Jams :)

What kind of event are you organizing for the upcoming Ubuntu Global Jam (UGJ)?

We are mostly going to focus on translations. This has traditionally been our strong point, as we exceeded 90% translation of Ubuntu about 2 years ago. Now we are focusing on translation quality and consistency. This time we want to put extra polish into translation for the LTS. In addition to that, a couple of people will focus on creating videos explaining how to perform basic tasks in Ubuntu (installing Ubuntu, Installing/removing software, Unity “tricks”…) and how to contribute to Ubuntu (how to start translating in Launchpad, how to report a bug, common translation mistakes in Slovenian). We will also be testdriving Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and report bugs we find on the way. More info can be found in our Ubuntu Global Jam announcement (in Slovenian only).

Is this the first UGJ event you’re organizing?

Nope. We have already organized 3 Ubuntu Global Jams. The first one was online only and the last two have been organized offline. We are quite lucky to have Kiberpipa, which has kindly been providing us a great venue with a lot of space and internet access. So we mostly need to do marketing of the event, coordinate transport and grab some pizzas :).

How do you think UGJ events help the Ubuntu community and Ubuntu?

The results of previous UGJs have typically meant about 4000-5000 translated messages for us which is amazing for one day. Good translation coverage helps to grow Ubuntu usage in Slovenia. We have also managed to report a couple of bugs which improved overall quality. More importantly, in average about 15 people attend our global jam, so we meet and hang out with people we usually only see online. This vastly improves team cohesiveness. In addition there are always some newcomers, which is fantastic for community growth. Also, it’s fun :).

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You’ve probably read it in the news: as part of the ongoing initiative to make Ubuntu a target for app developers, we proudly announced the Ubuntu App Showdown contest last week.

The way it works is simple and the rules are well documented, so I won’t go into the details: in short, you’ve got 3 weeks to create a new app, submit it to MyApps and you can win awesome prizes, including 2 laptops from system76 and a many many Nokia N9 smartphones from the Qt project. So if you’ve always wanted to start application development in Ubuntu, that’s a unique opportunity!

So here’s a reminder that the Ubuntu App Showdown is officially starting today, and you’ve got until the 9th July 2012 to create and submit a cool app according to the rules.

Starting also today, we’ve got a series of app developer workshops to help you get started with writing your app. Coming up:

Monday 18th June

Session Time
Intro to Python (part 1) 15:00 UTC
Intro to Python (part 2) 16:00 UTC
Getting started with Quickly 17:00 UTC
Intro to Gtk 3/GObject 18:00 UTC
Getting started with Glade 19:00 UTC

Some other important points:

I’m personally very excited about the contest. It’s been great to see lots of questions and positive reactions over the weekend and I’m really looking forward to see lots of awesome apps coming into the Ubuntu Software Centre!

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