Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'snapcraft'

Daniel Holbach

Working with a new technology often brings you to see things in a new light and re-think previous habits. Especially when it challenges the status quo and expectations of years of traditional use. Snaps are no exception in this regard. As one example twenty years ago we simply didn’t have today’s confinement technologies.

Luckily is using snapcraft a real joy: you write one declarative file, define your snap’s parts, make use of snapcraft‘s many plugins and if really necessary, you write a quick and simple plugin using Python to run your custom build.

Many of the first issues new snaps ran into were solved by improvements and new features in snapd and snapcraft. If you are still seeing a problem with your snap, we want you to get in touch. We are all interested in seeing more software as snaps, so let’s work together on them!

Enter the Sandpit

I mentioned it in my last announcement of the last Snappy Playpen event already, but as we saw many new snaps being added there in the last days, I wanted to mention it again. We started a new initiative called the Sandpit.

It’s a place where you can easily

  • list a snap you are working on and are looking for some help
  • find out at a glance if your favourite piece of software is already being snapped

It’s a very light-weight process: simply edit a wiki and get in touch with whoever’s working on the snap. The list grew quite quickly, so there’s loads of opportunities to find like-minded snap authors and get snaps online together.

You can find many of the people listed on the Sandpit wiki either in #snappy on Freenode or on Gitter. Just ask around and somebody will help.

Happy snapping everyone!

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Daniel Holbach

Are you interested in snapping software and need help?

snapcraft-website

There’s a lot of good reasons for snapping software:

  • You get software out to millions of users: Ubuntu (snapd installed by default since Ubuntu 16.04 LTS), snapd available too on Arch, Debian, Gentoo, Fedora, openSUSE, openembedded, yocto and OpenWRT.
  • You get to define the experience: ship the stack the way you tested it. Just one simple test-scenario for you.
  • Building a snap is simple (one piece of YAML controls the build), publishing is instantaneous (one command to run, automatic review).
  • Multiple release channels in the store.

If you’re intrigued but need help to get started, tomorrow is a great time for this, as we’re going to have another Snappy Playpen event.

Tomorrow (13th Sept 2016) we are going to hang out on Gitter and IRC and will be there to answer your questions, work on snaps together and have fun!

In the Snappy Playpen project we are collecting best-practices and work on getting snaps out there together. We’re a friendly bunch and look forward to meeting you!

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Daniel Holbach

I’m looking forward to next week, as

Going-To-Akademy-2016On Wednesday I’m going to give this workshop

So if you are interested in learning how to publish software easily and directly to users, this might be just for you.

Snaps are self-contained, confined apps, which run across a variety of Linux systems. The process of snapping software is very straight-forward and publishing them is very quick as well. The whole process offers many things upstreams and app publishers have been asking for years.

The workshop is interactive, all that’s required is that you either have VirtualBox or qemu installed or run any flavour of Ubuntu 16.04 or later. I’m going to bring USB sticks with images.

The workshop will consist of three very straight-forward parts:

  • Using the snap command to find, install, remove, update and revert software installations.
  • Using snapcraft to build and publish software.
  • Taking a look at KDE/Qt software and see how it’s snapped.

A few words about your host of the session: I’m Daniel Holbach, I have been part of the Ubuntu community since its very early days and work for Canonical on the Community team. Right now I’m working closely with the Snappy team on making publishing software as much fun as it should be.

See you next Wednesday!

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Daniel Holbach

It’s been a while since our last Snappy Clinic, so we asked for your input on which topics to cover. Thanks for the feedback so far.

In our next session Sergio Schvezov is going to talk about what’s new in Snapcraft and the changes in the 2.x series. Be there and you are going to be up-to-date on how to publish your software on Snappy Ubuntu Core. There will be time for questions afterwards.

Join us on the 12th February 2016 at 16:00 UTC on http://ubuntuonair.com.

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Daniel Holbach

It’s been a while since our last Snappy Clinic (here’s a link to all videos) and since Ubuntu Online Summit a lot of great things happened in Snapcraft:

Among the changes: a nil plugin, support of pip packages, support globs in the copy plugin, a nodejs plugin, add go-packages to the go plugin, countless bugfixes and tests, a more beautiful interface and more documentation.

The above and to get Sergio Schvezov on camera are reasons enough for us to have another Snappy Clinic

See you later! </p>
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Daniel Holbach

As announced earlier, we had a Ubuntu Snappy Core Clinic yesterday and we had a great time. Sergio Schvezov, Ted Gould and I talked about snapcraft in general, what’s new in the 0.3 release and showed off a couple of examples how to package software for Ubuntu Snappy Core. As you can see in the video, none of the snapcraft.yaml files length exceeded 30 lines (and this file is all that’s required); compared to what packaging on various platforms usually looks like that’s just beautiful.

We are going to have these clinics more regularly now. They will always revolve around the world of Snappy Ubuntu Core and there will always be room for questions, requests, feedback and what your want them to be.

ROS people might be interested in the one: we are very likely going to talk about snapcraft’s catkin plugin.

If you have missed the show yesterday, here it is in full length:

You might be wondering why I’m posting two videos. Unfortunately I accidentally pressed the “stop broadcast” button when I was actually looking for “stop screensharing”. Once I hit the button, we couldn’t find a way to resume the broadcast and we had to start a new one. I’m sorry about that.

If anyone of you knows a browser plugin which shows a “are you sure you want to stop the broadcast” warning, that would be fantastic. I could imagine I’m not the only one who might have confused the two when they were busy doing a demo, getting feedback on IRC and were busy talking. </p>
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Daniel Holbach

We promised more Snappy Clinics and Monday, 19th October 2015 16:00 UTC is going to be our next one.

This time we are going to have two of the main Snapcraft developers, Sergio Schvezov and Ted Gould around, who are going to

  • give an introduction to what snapcraft is,
  • talk about what’s new in the 0.3 release,
  • show how we can use a custom plugin from upstream snapcraft for a new project and
  • put together a snap from scratch.

Of course we’ll be there to answer all your questions as well.

Catch us on http://ubuntuonair.com for the show and let’s chat on IRC afterwards.

If you haven’t heard of snapcraft yet: it’s a beautiful way to get your software out to users on Ubuntu Snappy Core and it’s super easy!

 

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Daniel Holbach

In the flurry of uploads for the C++ ABI transition and other frantic work (Thursday is Feature Freeze day) this gem maybe went unnoticed:

snapcraft (0.1) wily; urgency=low

  * Initial release

What this means? If you’re on wily, you can easily try out snapcraft and get started turning software into snaps. We have some initial docs available on the developer site which should help you find your way around.

This is a 0.1 release, so there are bugs and there might be bigger changes coming your way, but there will also be more docs, more plugins and more good stuff in general. If you’re curious, you might want to sign up for the daily build (just add the ppa:snappy-dev/snapcraft-daily PPA).

Here’s a brilliant example of what snapcraft can do for you: packaging a Java app was never this easy.

If you’re more into client apps, check out Ted’s article on how to create a QML snap.

As you can easily see: the future is on its way and upstreams and app developer will have a much easier time sharing their software.

As I said above: snapcraft is still a 0.1 release. If you want to let us know your feedback and find bugs or propose merges, you can find snapcraft in Launchpad.

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