Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'packaging'

Daniel Holbach

As announced earlier, we had a Ubuntu Snappy Core Clinic yesterday and we had a great time. Sergio Schvezov, Ted Gould and I talked about snapcraft in general, what’s new in the 0.3 release and showed off a couple of examples how to package software for Ubuntu Snappy Core. As you can see in the video, none of the snapcraft.yaml files length exceeded 30 lines (and this file is all that’s required); compared to what packaging on various platforms usually looks like that’s just beautiful.

We are going to have these clinics more regularly now. They will always revolve around the world of Snappy Ubuntu Core and there will always be room for questions, requests, feedback and what your want them to be.

ROS people might be interested in the one: we are very likely going to talk about snapcraft’s catkin plugin.

If you have missed the show yesterday, here it is in full length:

You might be wondering why I’m posting two videos. Unfortunately I accidentally pressed the “stop broadcast” button when I was actually looking for “stop screensharing”. Once I hit the button, we couldn’t find a way to resume the broadcast and we had to start a new one. I’m sorry about that.

If anyone of you knows a browser plugin which shows a “are you sure you want to stop the broadcast” warning, that would be fantastic. I could imagine I’m not the only one who might have confused the two when they were busy doing a demo, getting feedback on IRC and were busy talking. :-)

Update: David Planella showed me the Youtube video editor, so here’s the merged video.

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Daniel Holbach

I have some very exciting news, but wanted to share some thoughts I had earlier today.

Since I joined the Ubuntu community I’ve always had to do with people who want to ship their software in Ubuntu and as I’m a generally excitable guy I always thought “finally, it became so much easier – we’re there”! Over the past years we got better documentation, PPAs in Launchpad, the dh command, bzr-builddeb, daily builds in Launchpad, pkgme, the ARB process, translated documentation and lots of other initiatives which always felt like we made the world a better place for ISVs, third party app developers, upstream developers and whoever else wanted their software to be in Ubuntu.

Fast-forward to Ubuntu on the phone and click. Suddenly it became SUPER easy, even easier to ship software. Write a manifest, run “click build“, upload it to the store where it gets auto-reviewed and you’re golden. This was possible because apparmor and friends were so tightly integrated into the phone experience and confinement fully worked, so we could trust apps to be safe and trust our automatic reviews. Finally!


snappy, the evolution of click, has a much broader scope and is finally moving into the center of attention of many and will at some stage also get on the phone and elsewhere. It shares the concept of a central software store with confined apps but brings atomic upgrades, rollbacks and lots of other goodness.

From the point of view of somebody who’s shipping software some things were still missing though. How do you easily do repeatable builds, especially if they involve bundling other software?

Enter snapcraft. A thing of beauty. Finally you can specify all relevant meta-data in one file, define which parts make up your app and snapcraft’s plugins (Go, Java, autotools, etc.) will take care of pulling and building sources and binaries, which files to ship exactly and everything else. It’s magic.

We just shipped 0.2 of snapcraft and the amount of new tests, bug fixes and goodness which landed is staggering. Even more importantly: the syntax of snapcraft.yaml is now very likely going to be stable.

I have more good news:

we are going to have our first of many Ubuntu Snappy Clinics brought to you by Sergio Schvezov, Michael Vogt and myself. The topics of these clinics are going to change, but will always be centered around snappy and the technologies around it and will give enough opportunities to ask your questions and work on things together.

Now is a brilliant time to involved with snapcraft.

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Daniel Holbach

Out of nowhere, the Ukrainian translations team came up and translated 70% (the threshold where we call translations ‘complete enough to be official’) of the Ubuntu Packaging Guide into Ukrainian. This all happened within just a couple of days.

All I can say is: amazing work and Дуже дякую (thanks a lot)! Keep it up


We are going to prepare an upload to Debian and Ubuntu in the coming days as well. Again: fantastic work everyone.

Call for help

This post of course can’t go out without a call for help.

Thanks again translations community, you all are heroes. It’s you who makes Ubuntu welcoming to everyone!

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Daniel Holbach

I’m please to announce the following changes have landed in the Ubuntu Packaging Guide:

  • The Packaging Guide is now fully translated into French! Bravo, équipe français! Thanks a lot everyone who helped out here!
  • We moved from to our new home – don’t despair, redirects are in place!This was done, because more and more moved into the direction of delivering tutorials for people who want to create content (apps, scopes, charms, etc.) on top of Ubuntu.
    This also gives us the benefit that we don’t have to integrate the guide into a wordpress installation somehow, but maintain it all on our own.
    Thanks a lot Tom Haddon for helping set this up and Andrew Starr-Bochicchio for beautifying the landing page. Great work everyone!
  • We are finally going to get rid of the old wiki guide. Andrew had announce the move many months ago and we should now be safe to remove the content.

Our journey is far from over. If you want to help out, please do!

  • We have bugs filed against the packaging guide and need help. Some are tagged as ‘bitesize‘ already.
  • Please also help translating the guide. Many teams have already put some work into this. You can help out by either translating or reviewing translated strings.

Keep up the good work everyone. This is great! :-)

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Daniel Holbach

The German translations team have done it! They brought the German translation of the Ubuntu Packaging Guide above 70%, which is the magic threshold for us to enable the translation in the package. Since earlier today you will find this in the Packaging Guide Daily Build PPA (soon going to land in Debian and then in Ubuntu too):

daniel@daydream:~$ apt-cache search german packaging guide ubuntu
ubuntu-packaging-guide-html-de - Ubuntu Packaging Guide - HTML guide - German version
ubuntu-packaging-guide-pdf-de - Ubuntu Packaging Guide - PDF guide - German version
ubuntu-packaging-guide-epub-de - Ubuntu Packaging Guide - EPUB guide - German version

You can also check out the HTML version, single page HTML, PDF version and EPUB version on the web.

This is great news for everyone who wants to get started with Ubuntu development as it will make the first steps easier. Let’s get the translations up to 100% now! :)

Current translations stats are looking like this now:

  • Spanish (96%).
  • Brazilian Portuguese, Russian (83%).
  • German (72%).
  • Traditional Chinese (28%).
  • Japanese (14%).
  • French (10%).
  • Dutch, Indonesian (5%).
  • Chinese Hong Kong (1%).
  • Italian, Greek, Telugu, Australian English, Vietnamese, Kannada, Macedonian, Swedish, Turkish, Simplified Chinese. Latvian, Slovenian, Croatian, Hungarian, Catalan (0%).

Please help out making the guide available in your language as well. Start here.

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Daniel Holbach

I’m quite happy with the progress the Packaging Guide is making. We managed to fix a bunch of bugs this cycle and most importantly we got it into Ubuntu and made it translatable. We only opened translations a couple of weeks ago, but some language teams have been hard at work:

  1. pt_BR.po (18%)
  2. ja.po (14%)
  3. ru.po (9%)
  4. es.po (5%)
  5. id.po (4%)
    de.po (4%)
  6. nl.po (1%)
  7. sv.po (0%)
    fr.po (0%)
    lv.po (0%)
    zh_TW.po (0%)
    hu.po (0%)
    ca.po (0%)

At UDS we decided that for translations which came to a percentage of completion of >= 70% we would build separate packages for those languages. Up until to that percentage we will only keep the translations in Launchpad.

This means there is still some way to go for all of us, but this is a great great step already. Thanks a lot for your hard work on this!

There are obviously many more bugs to fix and we’d love your help.

Bitesize bugs:

Make it prettier:

One bug we’d love to see some help with is #1043232 Packaging Guide FTBFS – it looks like the build fails due to Japanese translations. Right now all translations are disabled, which serves as a workaround for now.

Thanks again to everyone who helped out with the Packaging Guide. Your help has got many many contributors on their way. Keep up the good work!

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