Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'devices'

Daniel Holbach

Whether or not Ubuntu Edge will get the green light or not (read Joey’s great 5 Reasons Why You Should Stop What You’re Doing & Pledge to #UbuntuEdge), everybody’s hard at work making Ubuntu Touch, the beautiful mobile OS happen.

The 7

Two weeks ago we had our first Ubuntu Touch Porting Clinic and it went quite well. We found and fixed a number of issues in our tools, our porting guide and many porters turned up to ask their questions and update the images.

There’s also still Michael Hall’s offer to win an OPPO Find 5. If you are interested in winning it, or work on an existing port, create a new one and generally get Ubuntu Touch on devices out there, show up, talk to the Ubuntu Touch engineers, find out what’s happening and how to get involved.

It’s all happening

Or reach us on the ubuntu-phone mailing list.

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Daniel Holbach

In the last weeks I blogged a couple of times about how we want to get Ubuntu out to more and more users in a much much easier way. It would be great if we could have gotten all images built in the data centre, but unfortunately do redistributability issues (some firmwares, blobs and proprietary kernel modules) not allow us to redistribute them easily.
Another issue were some short-comings in our infrastructure, which have to some degree been fixed already.

Anyway… we wanted to make it easier and take sort of a short-cut, so the unstoppable Sergio Schvezov sat down and restructured phablet-tools to let us much more easily support community ports of Ubuntu Touch.

What does this mean?

The four

Up until now, phablet-flash just supported these four devices: Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4, Nexus 7 and Nexus 10. That was it.

After some discussions with port maintainers around the globe, we are quite happy to announce that we are now adding the following community ports to the mix: HTC Desire Z, Samsung Galaxy S2, Huawei Ascend P1. Now the family of phablet-flash‘able devices would look like this:

The 7

 

Once Sergio’s branch has landed, you will be able to just run
phablet-flash community --device u9200

to flash your device. (The above would be what you’d need to type in for a Huawei Ascend P1.) Until then you can just bzr branch lp:~sergiusens/phablet-tools/flash_change and run it from there.

More and more devices are on the way, and the process for telling phablet-flash about your port is actually quite easy.

You can help!

If you have any of the devices listed on our Touch Devices list, and you made a backup of things and you generally know your way around in terms of flashing, etc. Do the following:

  1. Check if your port is registered already. If yes, great.
    If not, please talk to the port maintainers listed on the page linked from our devices list and follow the instructions for registering the port.
  2. bzr branch lp:~sergiusens/phablet-tools/flash_change
    cd flash_change
    ./phablet-flash community --device <vendor> (ie, i9100)
  3. Give feedback on the ubuntu-phone mailing list.

Update: now it’s just
bzr branch lp:phablet-tools; cd phablet-tools
./phablet-flash community --device <vendor>

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Daniel Holbach

These are very exciting times for Ubuntu Touch. Not only is the Ubuntu Edge, an Ubuntu super-phone, being funded right now, but we are also making lots of progress on getting Ubuntu running perfectly on phones and tablets near you.

Ubuntu Touch

I blogged about this a couple of times now, but Ubuntu Touch has been ported to LOTS of devices in the meantime. If we consult our Touch Devices list, there are 45 working ports, with 30 more in progress, and across 21 different brands. This is awesome. Now it’s time to bring all of them into the fold.

There are two things we have to do:

  1. Update some of the ports to the flipped container model. This switch has been happening over the last couple of weeks, but we’re there now. Android bits now run on top of an Ubuntu container. Some of the images still need to be updated to benefit from this.
  2. Enable the ports in phablet-flash. Yes, you read correctly. Since the announce of the Touch preview, we only supported four devices (Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4, Nexus 7 and Nexus 10). We always wanted to make it easier to flash all other devices too, and now we’re almost there: If you as an image maintainer make some information available, phablet-flash will soon be able to pick it up.

Updating your image to the new world order is something we are discussing today, 1st August, in #ubuntu-touch on irc.freenode.net. We are having an Ubuntu Touch Porting Clinic today. So bring your device, your questions and we’ll help you get set up for the new image formats.

If you want your images to be supported by phablet-flash, that can be easily arranged too. Follow this process, to document how the flashing of your image works. Check out the latest branch of phablet-flash (not yet landed in trunk) to try out if your image works: lp:~sergiusens/phablet-tools/flash_change.

As always: if you have any questions, talk to us on #ubuntu-touch on irc.freenode.net or on the ubuntu-phone mailing list.

Update: now it’s just
bzr branch lp:phablet-tools; cd phablet-tools
./phablet-flash community --device <vendor>

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Daniel Holbach

The unstoppable Sergio Schvezov is working on bug 1201811 right now. Once it’s fixed this should put is into a position where users of devices for which we have Ubuntu Touch images (and not just the four devices we supported right from the start) can just use phablet-flash. This doesn’t mean that they are “officially supported” or that they’re built daily in the Canonical data centre, but that you can make use of the images much more easily.

Over time we still want to build more images in the data centre in a regular fashion. One of the big blockers there has been information about the redistributability of firwmare, blobs and closed kernel modules. If you have information about the licenses any of these, it’d be great if you could help with updating the Touch device pages.

On Thursday, 1st August we are going to hold a Ubuntu Touch Porting Clinic in #ubuntu-touch on irc.freenode.net where you will be able to ask all the questions you have and our local experts can help you with updating your image(s) to the new world order. We hope to see you there!

Ubuntu Touch

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Daniel Holbach

Some weeks ago I wrote a blog post and shared a personal view on Ubuntu’s history as a project. In there I explained (among other things) my view that Ubuntu as a project has quite often taken hard decisions to bring something new and exciting to people. The goal always was the same: bring open source in a beautiful form to as many people as possible. If I look around me today, it’s just beautiful to see what we’ve achieved. In conversations it’s easy for me to explain what I work on, almost everybody has heard of Ubuntu or Linux or Open Source. Lots of people, even folks outside the tech scene, try out Ubuntu every day, and are quite happy with what we brought to the table.

In recent months we drastically increased the pace though. It’s amazing to see how many teams work on the phone, on porting, on our app story and on making one Ubuntu happen across all kinds of devices. My gut feeling was that with every new video showing off another new working part, the buzz and excitement grew. “We actually can pull this off” seems to be the message everyone is getting. It makes me proud being part of this and happy to see that this is coming to fruition.

Starting the Ubuntu Edge project was another bold move in this regard. Not only working with carriers and hardware manufacturers on bringing out a device running Ubuntu, which is already fantastic on its own terms, but getting out a high-end device which showcases our vision for a converged device, seems to have excited many people around the globe. Press coverage, comments on blog posts and the incredible amounts of backers in such short time all seem to say “CAN’T WAIT!”.

If you are excited about “one Ubuntu on all kinds of devices”, want to help make this a reality, consider pledging as well. If you are looking for a new phone anyway, one which you can use as your PC as well, consider pledging a bit more. This is totally going to be worth it. :-)

(Can’t see the video, click here.)

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