Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'devices'

Daniel Holbach

Daniel McGuire is unstoppable. The work I mentioned yesterday was great, here’s some more, showing what would happen when the user selects “Playing Music”.

help app - playing music

 

More feedback we received so far:

  • Kevin Feyder suggested using a different icon for the app.
  • Michał Prędotka asked if we were planning to add more icons/pictures and the answer is “yes, we’d love to if it doesn’t clutter up the interface too much”. We are going to start a call for help with the content soon.
  • Robin of ubuntufun.de asked the same thing as Michał and wondered where the translations were. We are going to look into that. He generally like the Ubuntu-like style.

Do you have any more feedback? Anything you’d like to look or work differently? Anything you’d like to help with?

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Daniel Holbach

Some of you might have noticed the Help app in the store, which has been around for a couple of weeks now. We are trying to make it friendlier and easier to use. Maybe you can comment and share your ideas/thoughts.

Apart from actual bugs and adding more and more useful content, we also wanted the app to look friendlier and be more intuitive and useful.

The latest trunk lp:help-app can be seen as version 0.3 in the store or if you run

bzr branch lp:help-app
less help-app/HACKING

you can run and check it out locally.

Here’s the design Daniel McGuire suggested going forward.

help-mockup

What are your thoughts? If you look at the content we currently have, how else would you expect the app to look like or work?

Thanks a lot Daniel for your work on this! :-)

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Daniel Holbach

15.04 is out!

ubuntu.com

 

And another Ubuntu release went out the the door. I can’t believe that it’s the 22nd Ubuntu release already.

There’s a lot to be excited about in 15.04. The first phone powered by Ubuntu went out to customers and new devices are in the pipeline. The underpinnings of the various variants of Ubuntu are slowly converging, new Ubuntu flavours saw the light of day (MATE and Desktop next), new features landed, new apps added, more automated tests were added, etc. The future of Ubuntu is looking very bright.

What’s Ubuntu Core?

One thing I’m super happy about is a very very new addition: Ubuntu Core and snappy. What does it offer? It gives you a minimal Ubuntu system, automatic and bulletproof updates with rollback, an app store and very straight-forward enablement and packaging practices.

It has been brilliant to watch the snappy-devel@ and snappy-app-devel@ mailing lists in recent weeks and notice how much interest from enthusiasts, hobbyists, hardware manufacturers, porters and others get interested and get started. If you have a look at Dustin’s blog post, you get a good idea of what’s happening. It also features a video of Mark, who explains how Ubuntu has adapted to the demands of a changing IT world.

One fantastic example of how Ubuntu Snappy is already powering devices you had never thought of is the Erle-Copter. (If you can’t see the video, check out this link.)

It’s simply beautiful how product builders and hobbyists can now focus on what they’re interested in: building a tool, appliance, a robot, something crazy, something people will love or something which might change a small art of the world somewhere. What’s taken out of the equation by Ubuntu is: having to maintain a linux distro.

Maintaining a linux distro

Whenever I got a new device in my home I could SSH into, I was happy and proud. I always felt: “wow, they get it – they’re using open source software, they’re using linux”. This  feeling was replaced at some stage, when I realised how rarely my NAS or my router received system updates. When I checked for changelog entries of the updates I found out how only some of the important CVEs of the last year were mentioned, sometimes only “feature updates” were mentioned.

To me it’s clear that not all product builders or hardware companies collaborate with the NSA and create backdoors on purpose, but it’s hard work to maintain a linux stack and to do it responsibly.

That’s why I feel Ubuntu Core is an offering that “has legs” (as Mark Shuttleworth would say): as somebody who wants to focus on building a great product or solving a specific use case, you can do just that. You can ship your business logic in a snap on top of Ubuntu Core and be done with it. Brilliant!

What’s next?

Next week is Ubuntu Online Summit (5-7 May). There we are going to discuss the plans for the next time and that’s where you can get involved, ask questions, bring up your ideas and get to know the folks who are working on it now.

I’ll write a separate blog post in the coming days explaining what’s happening next week, until then feel free to have a look at:

 

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Daniel Holbach

I already blogged about the help app I was working on a bit in the last time. I wanted to go into a bit more detail now that we reached a new milestone.

What’s the idea behind it?

In a conversation in the Community team we noticed that there’s a lot of knowledge we gathered in the course of having used Ubuntu on a phone for a long time and that it might make sense to share tips and tricks, FAQ, suggestions and lots more with new device users in a simple way.

The idea was to share things like “here’s how to use edge swipes to do X” (maybe an animated GIF?) and “if you want to do Y, install the Z app from the store” in an organised and clever fashion. Obviously we would want this to be easily editable (Markdown) and have easy translations (Launchpad), work well on the phone (Ubuntu HTML5 UI toolkit) and work well on the web (Ubuntu Design Web guidelines) too.

What’s the state of things now?

There’s not much content yet and it doesn’t look perfect, but we have all the infrastructure set up. You can now start contributing! :-)

screenshot of web editionscreenshot of web edition screenshot of phone app editionscreenshot of phone app edition

 

What’s still left to be done?

  • We need HTML/CSS gurus who can help beautifying the themes.
  • We need people to share their tips and tricks and favourite bits of their Ubuntu devices experience.
  • We need hackers who can help in a few places.
  • We need translators.

What you need to do? For translations: you can do it in Launchpad easily. For everything else:

$ bzr branch lp:ubuntu-devices-help
$ cd ubuntu-devices-help
$ less HACKING

We’ve come a long way in the last week and with the easy of Markdown text and easy Launchpad translations, we should quickly be in a state where we can offer this in the Ubuntu software store and publish the content on the web as well.

If you want to write some content, translate, beautify or fix a few bugs, your help is going to be appreciated. Just ping myself, Nick Skaggs or David Planella on #ubuntu-app-devel.

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Daniel Holbach

Whether or not Ubuntu Edge will get the green light or not (read Joey’s great 5 Reasons Why You Should Stop What You’re Doing & Pledge to #UbuntuEdge), everybody’s hard at work making Ubuntu Touch, the beautiful mobile OS happen.

The 7

Two weeks ago we had our first Ubuntu Touch Porting Clinic and it went quite well. We found and fixed a number of issues in our tools, our porting guide and many porters turned up to ask their questions and update the images.

There’s also still Michael Hall’s offer to win an OPPO Find 5. If you are interested in winning it, or work on an existing port, create a new one and generally get Ubuntu Touch on devices out there, show up, talk to the Ubuntu Touch engineers, find out what’s happening and how to get involved.

It’s all happening

Or reach us on the ubuntu-phone mailing list.

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Daniel Holbach

In the last weeks I blogged a couple of times about how we want to get Ubuntu out to more and more users in a much much easier way. It would be great if we could have gotten all images built in the data centre, but unfortunately do redistributability issues (some firmwares, blobs and proprietary kernel modules) not allow us to redistribute them easily.
Another issue were some short-comings in our infrastructure, which have to some degree been fixed already.

Anyway… we wanted to make it easier and take sort of a short-cut, so the unstoppable Sergio Schvezov sat down and restructured phablet-tools to let us much more easily support community ports of Ubuntu Touch.

What does this mean?

The four

Up until now, phablet-flash just supported these four devices: Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4, Nexus 7 and Nexus 10. That was it.

After some discussions with port maintainers around the globe, we are quite happy to announce that we are now adding the following community ports to the mix: HTC Desire Z, Samsung Galaxy S2, Huawei Ascend P1. Now the family of phablet-flash‘able devices would look like this:

The 7

 

Once Sergio’s branch has landed, you will be able to just run
phablet-flash community --device u9200

to flash your device. (The above would be what you’d need to type in for a Huawei Ascend P1.) Until then you can just bzr branch lp:~sergiusens/phablet-tools/flash_change and run it from there.

More and more devices are on the way, and the process for telling phablet-flash about your port is actually quite easy.

You can help!

If you have any of the devices listed on our Touch Devices list, and you made a backup of things and you generally know your way around in terms of flashing, etc. Do the following:

  1. Check if your port is registered already. If yes, great.
    If not, please talk to the port maintainers listed on the page linked from our devices list and follow the instructions for registering the port.
  2. bzr branch lp:~sergiusens/phablet-tools/flash_change
    cd flash_change
    ./phablet-flash community --device <vendor> (ie, i9100)
  3. Give feedback on the ubuntu-phone mailing list.

Update: now it’s just
bzr branch lp:phablet-tools; cd phablet-tools
./phablet-flash community --device <vendor>

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Daniel Holbach

These are very exciting times for Ubuntu Touch. Not only is the Ubuntu Edge, an Ubuntu super-phone, being funded right now, but we are also making lots of progress on getting Ubuntu running perfectly on phones and tablets near you.

Ubuntu Touch

I blogged about this a couple of times now, but Ubuntu Touch has been ported to LOTS of devices in the meantime. If we consult our Touch Devices list, there are 45 working ports, with 30 more in progress, and across 21 different brands. This is awesome. Now it’s time to bring all of them into the fold.

There are two things we have to do:

  1. Update some of the ports to the flipped container model. This switch has been happening over the last couple of weeks, but we’re there now. Android bits now run on top of an Ubuntu container. Some of the images still need to be updated to benefit from this.
  2. Enable the ports in phablet-flash. Yes, you read correctly. Since the announce of the Touch preview, we only supported four devices (Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4, Nexus 7 and Nexus 10). We always wanted to make it easier to flash all other devices too, and now we’re almost there: If you as an image maintainer make some information available, phablet-flash will soon be able to pick it up.

Updating your image to the new world order is something we are discussing today, 1st August, in #ubuntu-touch on irc.freenode.net. We are having an Ubuntu Touch Porting Clinic today. So bring your device, your questions and we’ll help you get set up for the new image formats.

If you want your images to be supported by phablet-flash, that can be easily arranged too. Follow this process, to document how the flashing of your image works. Check out the latest branch of phablet-flash (not yet landed in trunk) to try out if your image works: lp:~sergiusens/phablet-tools/flash_change.

As always: if you have any questions, talk to us on #ubuntu-touch on irc.freenode.net or on the ubuntu-phone mailing list.

Update: now it’s just
bzr branch lp:phablet-tools; cd phablet-tools
./phablet-flash community --device <vendor>

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Daniel Holbach

The unstoppable Sergio Schvezov is working on bug 1201811 right now. Once it’s fixed this should put is into a position where users of devices for which we have Ubuntu Touch images (and not just the four devices we supported right from the start) can just use phablet-flash. This doesn’t mean that they are “officially supported” or that they’re built daily in the Canonical data centre, but that you can make use of the images much more easily.

Over time we still want to build more images in the data centre in a regular fashion. One of the big blockers there has been information about the redistributability of firwmare, blobs and closed kernel modules. If you have information about the licenses any of these, it’d be great if you could help with updating the Touch device pages.

On Thursday, 1st August we are going to hold a Ubuntu Touch Porting Clinic in #ubuntu-touch on irc.freenode.net where you will be able to ask all the questions you have and our local experts can help you with updating your image(s) to the new world order. We hope to see you there!

Ubuntu Touch

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Daniel Holbach

Some weeks ago I wrote a blog post and shared a personal view on Ubuntu’s history as a project. In there I explained (among other things) my view that Ubuntu as a project has quite often taken hard decisions to bring something new and exciting to people. The goal always was the same: bring open source in a beautiful form to as many people as possible. If I look around me today, it’s just beautiful to see what we’ve achieved. In conversations it’s easy for me to explain what I work on, almost everybody has heard of Ubuntu or Linux or Open Source. Lots of people, even folks outside the tech scene, try out Ubuntu every day, and are quite happy with what we brought to the table.

In recent months we drastically increased the pace though. It’s amazing to see how many teams work on the phone, on porting, on our app story and on making one Ubuntu happen across all kinds of devices. My gut feeling was that with every new video showing off another new working part, the buzz and excitement grew. “We actually can pull this off” seems to be the message everyone is getting. It makes me proud being part of this and happy to see that this is coming to fruition.

Starting the Ubuntu Edge project was another bold move in this regard. Not only working with carriers and hardware manufacturers on bringing out a device running Ubuntu, which is already fantastic on its own terms, but getting out a high-end device which showcases our vision for a converged device, seems to have excited many people around the globe. Press coverage, comments on blog posts and the incredible amounts of backers in such short time all seem to say “CAN’T WAIT!”.

If you are excited about “one Ubuntu on all kinds of devices”, want to help make this a reality, consider pledging as well. If you are looking for a new phone anyway, one which you can use as your PC as well, consider pledging a bit more. This is totally going to be worth it. :-)

(Can’t see the video, click here.)

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