Canonical Voices

Daniel Holbach

Appreciation for Michael Hall

Today marks another Ubuntu Community Appreciation Day, one of Ubuntu’s beautiful traditions, where you publicly thank people for their work. It’s always hard to pick just one person or a group of people, but you know what – better appreciate somebody’s work than nobody’s work at all.

One person I’d like to thanks for their work is Michael Hall. He is always around, always working on a number of projects, always involved in discussions on social media and never shy to add yet another work item to his TODO list. Even with big projects on his plate, he is still writing apps, blog entries, charms and hacks on a number of websites and is still on top of things like mailing list discussions.

I don’t know how he does it, but I’m astounded how he gets things done and still stays friendly. I’m glad he’s part of our team and tirelessly working on making Ubuntu a better place.

I also like this picture of him.

cat5000

Mike: keep up the good work! :-)

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Daniel Holbach

Ubuntu Online Summit: 12-14 November

Yet another Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS) is ahead of us. It’s going to happen from 12-14 November. Participation is open to everyone, so to attend simply:

If you still need to get a session on the schedule to discuss a topic related to your field, create the session soon!

What I love about the Ubuntu Online Summit is that people get together, invite some fresh sets of eyes and brains and figure out together where Ubuntu is going. The sessions are also not too long (1h), so you are forced to come conclusions (and work items!) quickly.

Sessions I’m particularly looking forward to are:

  • 12 Nov
    • 15 UTC – Community Roundtable
    • 15 UTC – Testing Unity 8 Desktop
    • 16 UTC – App/Scope development training events
    • 18 UTC – Community events in Vivid cycle
    • 19 UTC – More appdev/scope code examples
  • 13 Nov
    • 16 UTC – Community Council Feedback
    • 16 UTC – Porting Apps To Ubuntu
    • 18 UTC – Ubuntu Women Vivid Goals
    • 19 UTC – Ubuntu Community Q&A
  • 14 Nov
    • 14 UTC – Transparency and participation
    • 15 UTC – Promoting the Ubuntu phone in LoCos
    • 16 UTC – LoCo Team Activity Review
    • 18 UTC – Ubuntu Touch Component Store

Please note: session times might still be changed, so keep an eye on the schedule. (Also: there’s lots more good stuff!)

Looking forward to seeing you all there! :-D

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Daniel Holbach

In the Community Q&A with Alan and Michael yesterday, I talked a bit about the sprint in Washington already, but I thought I’d write up a bit more about it again.

First of all: it was great to see a lot of old friends and new faces at the sprint. Especially with the two events (14.10 release and upcoming phone release) coming together, it was good to lock people up in various rooms and let them figure it out when nobody could run away easily. For me it was a great time to chat with lots of people and figure out if we’re still on track and if our old assumptions still made sense.  :-)

We were all locked up in a room as well...We were all locked up in a room as well…

What was pretty fantastic was the general vibe there. Everyone was crazy busy, but everybody seemed happy to see that their work of the last months and years is slowly coming together. There are still bugs to be fixed but we are close to getting the first Ubuntu phone ever out the door. Who would have thought that a couple of years ago?

It was great to catch up with people about our App Development story. There were a number of things we looked at during the sprint:

  • Up until now we had a Virtualbox image with Ubuntu and the SDK installed for people at training (or App Dev School) events, who didn’t have Ubuntu installed. This was a clunky solution, my beta testing at xda:devcon confirmed that. I sat down with Michael Vogt who encouraged me to look into providing something more akin to an “official ISO” and showed me the ropes in terms of creating seeds and how livecd-rootfs is used.
  • I had a number of conversations with XiaoGuo Liu, who works for Canonical as well, and has been testing our developer site and our tools for the last few months. He also wrote lots and lots of great articles about Ubuntu development in Chinese. We talked about providing our developer site in Chinese as well, how we could integrate code snippets more easily and many other things.
  • I had a many chats at the breakfast buffet with Zoltan and Zsombor of the SDK team (it always looked like we were there at the same time).  We talked about making fat packages easier to generate, my experiences with kits and many other things.
  • It was also great to catch up with David Callé who is working on scopes documentation. He’s just great!

What also liked a lot was being able to debug issues with the phone on the spot. I changed to the proposed channel, set it to read-write and installed debug symbols and voilà, grabbing the developer was never easier. My personal recommendation: make sure the problem happens around 12:00, stand in the hallway with your laptop attached to the phone and wait for the developer in charge to grab lunch. This way I could find out more about a couple of issues which are being fixed now.

It was also great to meet the non-Canonical folks at the sprint who worked on the Core Apps like crazy.

What I liked as well was our Berlin meet-up: we basically invited Berliners, ex-Berliners and honorary Berliners and went to a Mexican place. Wished I met those guys more often.

I also got my Ubuntu Pioneers T-Shirt. Thanks a lot! I’ll make sure to post a selfie (as everyone else :-)) soon.

Thanks a lot for a great sprint, now I’m looking forward to the upcoming Ubuntu Online Summit (12-14 Nov)! Make sure you register and add your sessions to the schedule!

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Daniel Holbach

We just created a new Ubuntu mailing list called ubuntu-community-team.

As we didn’t have a place like this before, we created it so we can

  • have discussions around planning community events
  • start all kinds of initiatives around Ubuntu
  • allow enthusiasts of the Ubuntu community to kick around new ideas
  • bring people from all parts of our community together so we can learn from each other
  • hang out and have fun

We are looking forward to seeing you on the list as well, sign up on this page.

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Daniel Holbach

The idea

At the last Ubuntu Online Summit, we had a session in which we discussed (among other things) the idea to make it easier for LoCo teams to share news, stories, pictures, events and everything else. A lot of great work is happening around the world already, but a lot of us don’t get to hear about it.

I took an action item to schedule a meeting to discuss the idea some more. The rough plan being that we add functionality to the LoCo Team Portal which allows teams to share their stories, which then end up on Planet Ubuntu.

We held the meeting last week, find the IRC logs here.

The mini-spec

Find the spec here and please either comments on the loco-contacts mailing list or below in the comments. If you are a designer, a web developer, know Django or just generally want to get involved, please let us know! :)

We will discuss the spec some more, turn it into bug reports and schedule a series of hack days to work on this together.

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Daniel Holbach

Got any plans for the weekend?

maps

This weekend (4-6 April) the Ubuntu community is celebrating another Ubuntu Global Jam! The goal, as always, is to get together as a team and make Ubuntu better, get people involved and have fun. In the past we all focused on packaging, fixing bugs, translations, documentation and testing. The most recent addition to the mix are App Dev School events.

The goal of App Dev Schools is to have a look at developing apps for Ubuntu together. We made this a lot easier by providing presentation material and virtualbox images and instructions for how to run an event. If you have a bit of programming experience, it should be easy for you to run the sessions with just a bit of preparation time.

Why is this exciting and probably a good idea to discuss in the team? Simple: it has never been easier to write apps for Ubuntu and publish them. You can choose between Qt/QML apps and HTML5 apps – both are easy to put together and packaging/publishing an app is a matter of a couple of a clicks. Awesome!

Check out the Ubuntu Global Jam page and find out how have your own local event. If it’s just you and a couple of friends meeting up – don’t worry – it’s still a jam!

Have a great weekend everyone!

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Daniel Holbach

Teaching Ubuntu App Development

Tablet and phone, running Ubuntu

At the vUDS in November we talked about having events where local communities could learn more about app development for Ubuntu for the first time. Since then we have come a long way:

  • We have some really nice materials set up.
  • The first events were held in a number of places around the world.
  • We got feedback and improved our docs.
  • Before the Ubuntu Global Jam and the release parties for 14.04 LTS we will have two Q&A sessions where you can ask all organisational and technical questions you might have.

You don’t have to do everything yourself!

When we started the initiative, we first talked to members of the Ubuntu community who knew a bit of app development already. Many of them liked the idea, but didn’t quite know how to set up an event or how to organise everything. We tried to address this by bringing them in touch with some of the LoCo teams which helped in a bunch of cases where events have already happened or are going to happen quite soon. We want more of this to happen.

It’s only understandable that you can’t do everything yourself, or that one person’s skills lie in a more organisational field and somebody else has some more experience with app development. Bringing the two together, we are going to have more interesting events, more people introduced to writing apps for Ubuntu, which will be great for everyone involved.

Getting started

Sounds good so far? Here’s what you can do to get more folks exposed to how sweet and easy it is to write apps for Ubuntu.

As somebody who can organise events, but might need to find a speaker: Ask in #ubuntu-app-devel on Freenode or on the ubuntu-app-devel@ mailing list, to see if anyone is in your area to give a talk. Ask on your LoCo’s or LUG’s mailing list as well. Even if somebody who’s into programming hasn’t developed using Ubuntu’s SDK yet, they should be able to familiarise themselves with the technologies quite easily.

As somebody who has written code before and didn’t find the Ubuntu app development materials too challenging, but might need to find some help with organising the event: Ask on the loco-contacts@ mailing list. There are LoCos all around the world and most of them will be happy to see somebody give a talk at an event.

Whichever camp you’re in:

Let’s make this happen together. Writing apps for Ubuntu and publishing them has never been easier, and they’ll make Ubuntu on phones/tablets much more interesting, and will run on the desktop as well.

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Daniel Holbach

Ubuntu Apps in China

The last weeks have been very exciting. New features have been added to the SDK (among other things these things were added: cross-compiling through ‘click chroot’ support, running the click reviewers tools automatically), HTML5 support was improved a lot (update to Cordova 3.4, new JavaScript APIs surfaced and many other great things) and new docs went up on developer.ubuntu.com as well. To me it feels like it’s getting easier and easier to write great apps every day. The choice of technology is sound (enables app authors very quickly), the design choices are both beautiful and consistent and the technology around it (packaging and publishing is so fast and easy!) just takes care of so many things for you.

It will be great to see more and more apps for Ubuntu coming in soon, and it will be especially fantastic since all of them are going to work on all current and future form-factors, being written in the same code.

What I was really happy to be involved with was our push for Ubuntu Apps in China. For the Ubuntu App Showdown (which is still running for around 3.5 weeks, until 9th April) we added a prize category for Chinese apps, which became the starting point for other activities.

App Showdown Judges

I’m super happy we have a diverse judges for the Ubuntu App Showdown. Jack Yu from Ubuntu Kylin, Joey Chan from the Ubuntu Core Apps team and Shuduo Sang from the PES team at Canonical. All of them have helped with lots of different questions and bits of organisation. Thanks a lot for your help!

App Development Events

We had a fantastic Ubuntu App Developer Week some two weeks ago, and while having the videos on YouTube works great for a lot of us, it’s not the best choice for China. Thanks a lot Shuduo for uploading all of the videos to youku.

This means that if you’re in China, you can just go ahead and get all the video goodness from there and learn all about Ubuntu App Development.

More events

I’m very grateful for all the help from the people at Ubuntu Kylin.

ubuntukylin

In no time they invited Joey Chan (who has worked on the RSS Reader Core App, among others) to give a talk at the NUDT university in Chansha. The event was well-attended and well-received – around 100 Ubuntu enthusiasts turned up and Joey explained about Ubuntu for phones and using QML to write apps.

Joey Chan in action

Videos are available here.

More events are planned, so stayed tuned for more news there. China was one of the first LoCos to have Ubuntu App Dev School events! :-)

Translations of Chinese App Development Docs

The Ubuntu Community in China was super helpful in translating an initial set of developer documentation up at developer.ubuntu.com/zh. Translations, peer review and getting the docs online was done in just a couple of days, which is just fantastic. Right now we are looking at translating more content, which should make translations a lot easier. Thanks a lot everyone!

Getting involved

If you have more ideas for what we could do for Ubuntu apps being more interesting to and in China, get in touch with me.

If you are into writing apps yourself, there is still 3.5 weeks to get into the Ubuntu App Showdown. What you have to do is simple:

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Daniel Holbach

App development for Ubuntu is a hot topic and many have blogged and talked about this in the past months. Still I’d like to point out two things which never cease to amaze me:

  • Writing the code of the app once and have it work on everything from a phone to a TV.
  • It’s easy. We had people join the Ubuntu Core Apps team, who had never written apps using QML or HTML5. These people now delivered some of the apps which will come preinstalled with Ubuntu phones in stores this year. Getting their feet wet and initial drafts of the apps up and running was a matter of days only.

This is just fantastic and something we should share.

Ubuntu App Dev Schools?

 

At UDS we had a really nice discussion about how to bring more App Development training events to our Ubuntu community. We came up with a number of work items, focusing on

  • improving our presentation materials,
  • making it easier for newcomers to step in, learn and present,
  • reaching out to app developer communities and our LoCo teams at the same time.

With the Ubuntu Global Jam coming up in just 3 weeks and soon followed by the 14.04 release and its release parties, we have to move fast to make this happen. To coordinate this better, David and I decided to have a daily standup meeting on Google Hangout at 9:30 UTC. Let us know (maybe on #ubuntu-locoteams) if you want to join the conversation.

We need help.

Obviously we need teams to organise events, but we need other help as well:

  • Planning. Join our planning events mentioned above.
  • Hosting. If you are interested in running an event, you should check our docs and see if there’s anything missing in there.
  • Collaborating. Talk to your LoCo team and see if you can host an Ubuntu App Dev School for Ubuntu Global Jam or your local 14.04 release party. Give us feedback on how it’s going.
  • Slightly unrelated. Help me with a VirtualBox question: I set up a VirtualBox image using Trusty, so we can have an up-to-date image with the newest SDK preinstalled, so we’re prepared if Mac or Windows users turn up to an event. Unfortunately the resolution is just up to 640×480, even with the Guest Additions loaded. Can anyone help me out?

If you are preparing to run the event, please check our Materials section, review what we have and give us feedback. Either leave a comment on this page, or…

On the following days we are going to have some Feedback / Q&A sessions on Ubuntu on Air:

There you will not only have the opportunity to ask questions about organising your event, but also all the technical questions you should have for running your presentations.

Another opportunity to find out more, is the LoCo Teams Update on Air on Saturday at 19 UTC.

Bringing more apps to Ubuntu is lots of fun and will make Ubuntu for phones/tablets/laptops/desktops/TVs/everything else a lot more interesting! :-)

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Daniel Holbach

packaging.ubuntu.com

I’m please to announce the following changes have landed in the Ubuntu Packaging Guide:

  • The Packaging Guide is now fully translated into French! Bravo, équipe français! Thanks a lot everyone who helped out here!
  • We moved from developer.ubuntu.com/packaging to our new home http://packaging.ubuntu.com – don’t despair, redirects are in place!This was done, because developer.ubuntu.com more and more moved into the direction of delivering tutorials for people who want to create content (apps, scopes, charms, etc.) on top of Ubuntu.
    This also gives us the benefit that we don’t have to integrate the guide into a wordpress installation somehow, but maintain it all on our own.
    Thanks a lot Tom Haddon for helping set this up and Andrew Starr-Bochicchio for beautifying the landing page. Great work everyone!
  • We are finally going to get rid of the old wiki guide. Andrew had announce the move many months ago and we should now be safe to remove the content.

Our journey is far from over. If you want to help out, please do!

  • We have bugs filed against the packaging guide and need help. Some are tagged as ‘bitesize‘ already.
  • Please also help translating the guide. Many teams have already put some work into this. You can help out by either translating or reviewing translated strings.

Keep up the good work everyone. This is great! :-)

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Daniel Holbach

Another UDS, a new world to discover

As part of the Ubuntu community, I’ve been part of many UDSes and a growing number of vUDSes and while it’d be easy to say “Another UDS, more new work items.” and be done with it, I’m very excited about this UDS.

In the last years I’ve mostly been involved with the Ubuntu Developer community, so the people who build Ubuntu itself, which is what other people install, deploy and build on. Last cycle I helped with managing the software store project, which got me involved in many discussions about apps on Ubuntu. This cycle I’m diving much deeper into the waters of Ubuntu App development and I’m looking forward to it.

Beautiful clocksBeautiful clocks

My major task will be to improve the materials we have for app development and generally raise awareness of Ubuntu as a great app platform. For this I will obviously have to learn a bit more about app development, so expect me to ask lots of questions in the next weeks. :-)

If this sounds like something you’re interested in or would like to help out with, here’s what I have noted down on my schedule for UDS, which starts tomorrow, 19th Nov 2013 and goes until 21st Nov 2013:

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

 

There will be a number of sessions, like the Community Council meeting, I’m going to attend as well, as I’ll be track lead for Community together with Jono.

Sign up for UDS, check out the complete schedule and find out how to participate.

Looking forward to seeing you there! :-)

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Daniel Holbach

I’m very proud of what quite a number of teams achieved together last week. On Friday we announced the opening of the Ubuntu Touch software store. Just to quickly illustrate who was all responsible for this, here’s a list of the teams/projects involved:

  • Click itself – the format in which we ship apps.
  • Community team – helped with coordination of whole app story and project management.
  • Design team – putting together plans for how the experience should be.
  • *dations teams (Foundations, Phonedations), getting everything in the phone image, helping with the integration of the download service.
  • IS, setting up servers and help with deployment.
  • Online Services (Client) – writing the code for the whole app management experience on the client side.
  • Online Services (Server) – putting together the software store, review capabilities, etc.
  • SDK team – teaching QtCreator about Ubuntu apps and click packages.
  • Security team – defining and putting together our app confinement strategy.
  • Unity teams – integration of the app scope and other bits and pieces.
  • Lots of others (feedback, code review, encouragement, etc).

I’m sure I forgot to mention a team or two, but it’s at least worth trying to point out who all was responsible for this. The security confinement, the SDK and Unity have obviously been under heavy development for a longer time already, some plans existed before, but the vast majority of what you can see now was planned three months ago. So with this in mind, I feel everybody involved in this project deserves a big hug and some words of praise. This is a great achievement.

There are definitely a bunch of things still left to be done, but now we have:

  • a good app development experience,
  • a software store you can easily submit apps to,
  • a mobile OS where you can easily install apps.

Go (virtual) team! :-D

Screenshot stolen from Michael Hall (https://plus.google.com/109919666334513536939/posts/T5dtW92Miid)

This project was my first try at project managing and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Hundreds of emails, lots of meetings and discussions on IRC made the software store a reality. Everybody worked very hard to bring this to fruition and it was a fantastic feeling to be able to download some new apps on my Nexus 7 today.

As I said above: there is still quite a few things we’ve got to do, so the coming weeks are going to bring us a lot of great stuff: purchases, some automation of the app review, easy app updates, apps with compiled code and much much more. Stay tuned and keep publishing your great apps!

Big hugs to the extended team, you are all heroes and thanks for the great time with you!

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Daniel Holbach

The next Ubuntu Developer Summit is coming up next week (27-29 August 2013) and you can already see a nice set of topics coming together in Launchpad. The schedule will, as always, be available at summit.ubuntu.com.

Jono Bacon and I are going to be track leads for the Community track, so I wanted to send out an invitation to get topics in, especially for bits concerning the Community track. If you are a team lead and had feedback from your team or you want to bring up a discussion topic where you are interested to help out with, check out our docs on how to submit a session for UDS. Please note: this is not a game of “this is what I think somebody should discuss and do for me”, so if you plan to bring up a session topic, be prepared, have a good idea of what might be on the agenda, reach out to people who might be interested in the topic, so you have a good set of participants and contributors to the project available.

If you just want to attend and listen in and contribute to sessions on the schedule, you can just do that as well, check out uds.ubuntu.com which has all the information on how to tune in. Register here. Can’t wait to see you all next week!

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Daniel Holbach

Whether or not Ubuntu Edge will get the green light or not (read Joey’s great 5 Reasons Why You Should Stop What You’re Doing & Pledge to #UbuntuEdge), everybody’s hard at work making Ubuntu Touch, the beautiful mobile OS happen.

The 7

Two weeks ago we had our first Ubuntu Touch Porting Clinic and it went quite well. We found and fixed a number of issues in our tools, our porting guide and many porters turned up to ask their questions and update the images.

There’s also still Michael Hall’s offer to win an OPPO Find 5. If you are interested in winning it, or work on an existing port, create a new one and generally get Ubuntu Touch on devices out there, show up, talk to the Ubuntu Touch engineers, find out what’s happening and how to get involved.

It’s all happening

Or reach us on the ubuntu-phone mailing list.

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Daniel Holbach

Surprising stats

Sébastien Bacher told me I was a bit obsessed with Ubuntu Packaging Guide translations and maybe I am, but I do believe that we’re thus eliminating one blocker on the way of people becoming Ubuntu developers.

Looking at the level of completion of translations of the packaging guide (or Ubuntu Development Guide), you might need to know that

  • with 70% of completion and above we publish the translated versions of the guide online and packaged in the archive
  • translations by newer team members are first reviewed, then accepted

If we just look at approved translations in Launchpad, things look like this:

If we look at what’s in the unreviewed queues of all translations teams, things get a lot more interesting:

Translations stats

If all unreviewed translations should get approved today, this would happen:

  • French would jump from 14% to 83% (soaring past German) and across the magic line of 70%.
  • Traditional Chinese would move up from 28% to 44% (just 26% away from the magic line).
  • Japanese would move from 15% to 25%.
  • And we’d have two more languages over the 5% line: Italian (0% ? 17%), Turkish (2% ? 15%), Greek (0% ? 5%).

Thanks a lot to all the translators who put hard work into this. You all are awesome!

If you’re an experienced team member of your translations team, help out with reviewing all unreviewed strings. From the above you can easily see which impact it’s going to have.

(Earlier this week, my good friend and office buddy Rouven showed me this tumblr, translators might enjoy.)

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Daniel Holbach

In the last weeks I blogged a couple of times about how we want to get Ubuntu out to more and more users in a much much easier way. It would be great if we could have gotten all images built in the data centre, but unfortunately do redistributability issues (some firmwares, blobs and proprietary kernel modules) not allow us to redistribute them easily.
Another issue were some short-comings in our infrastructure, which have to some degree been fixed already.

Anyway… we wanted to make it easier and take sort of a short-cut, so the unstoppable Sergio Schvezov sat down and restructured phablet-tools to let us much more easily support community ports of Ubuntu Touch.

What does this mean?

The four

Up until now, phablet-flash just supported these four devices: Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4, Nexus 7 and Nexus 10. That was it.

After some discussions with port maintainers around the globe, we are quite happy to announce that we are now adding the following community ports to the mix: HTC Desire Z, Samsung Galaxy S2, Huawei Ascend P1. Now the family of phablet-flash‘able devices would look like this:

The 7

 

Once Sergio’s branch has landed, you will be able to just run
phablet-flash community --device u9200

to flash your device. (The above would be what you’d need to type in for a Huawei Ascend P1.) Until then you can just bzr branch lp:~sergiusens/phablet-tools/flash_change and run it from there.

More and more devices are on the way, and the process for telling phablet-flash about your port is actually quite easy.

You can help!

If you have any of the devices listed on our Touch Devices list, and you made a backup of things and you generally know your way around in terms of flashing, etc. Do the following:

  1. Check if your port is registered already. If yes, great.
    If not, please talk to the port maintainers listed on the page linked from our devices list and follow the instructions for registering the port.
  2. bzr branch lp:~sergiusens/phablet-tools/flash_change
    cd flash_change
    ./phablet-flash community --device <vendor> (ie, i9100)
  3. Give feedback on the ubuntu-phone mailing list.

Update: now it’s just
bzr branch lp:phablet-tools; cd phablet-tools
./phablet-flash community --device <vendor>

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Daniel Holbach

We had our first Ubuntu Touch Porting clinic yesterday and we made quite a bit of progress there.

  1. Sergio Schvezov published a branch of phablet-tools, which will allow everyone to flash all kinds of devices (for which we have images) just by running something like phablet-flash community --device i9100
    This should make things a lot lot easier for everyone. The only thing which needs to be done is to follow this process which documents where the images live. (Flipped images are not a requirement for this.)
  2. Lots and lots of questions were answered in order to port Ubuntu Touch images to the new world order of flipped images. Since some weeks the Android bits live on top of Ubuntu, which will make our journey towards convergence over device borders a lot easier. During the process we updated our (work-in-progress) porting guide with everybody’s findings. Thanks a lot everyone for your hard work in debugging, asking and replying to questions!

We want Ubuntu Touch to run on as many devices as possible and we need some help here.

If you have a device on which Ubuntu runs fine (our devices lists is here), you can help out by doing a couple of different things:

  1. Help with the porting effort to flipped images. Check out the new porting guide. Find other folks who are interested in the port on the mailing list or on IRC. Ask questions, make it a team effort.
  2. Document location of the images. Follow this process to document where the images live. Make sure you 1) use a location for the image which can be used by something like wget/curl without user intervention and 2) check if the newest phablet-flash can handle it. 3) PROFIT!
  3. If image information for your device is already up (list here), check out Sergio’s branch and let us know on the mailing list how things work for you!

These are awesome times for Ubuntu and with every new port, we’ll learn and fix more of general Ubuntu to make it work everywhere. Join the team today! :-)

Update: now it’s just
bzr branch lp:phablet-tools; cd phablet-tools
./phablet-flash community --device <vendor>

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Daniel Holbach

These are very exciting times for Ubuntu Touch. Not only is the Ubuntu Edge, an Ubuntu super-phone, being funded right now, but we are also making lots of progress on getting Ubuntu running perfectly on phones and tablets near you.

Ubuntu Touch

I blogged about this a couple of times now, but Ubuntu Touch has been ported to LOTS of devices in the meantime. If we consult our Touch Devices list, there are 45 working ports, with 30 more in progress, and across 21 different brands. This is awesome. Now it’s time to bring all of them into the fold.

There are two things we have to do:

  1. Update some of the ports to the flipped container model. This switch has been happening over the last couple of weeks, but we’re there now. Android bits now run on top of an Ubuntu container. Some of the images still need to be updated to benefit from this.
  2. Enable the ports in phablet-flash. Yes, you read correctly. Since the announce of the Touch preview, we only supported four devices (Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4, Nexus 7 and Nexus 10). We always wanted to make it easier to flash all other devices too, and now we’re almost there: If you as an image maintainer make some information available, phablet-flash will soon be able to pick it up.

Updating your image to the new world order is something we are discussing today, 1st August, in #ubuntu-touch on irc.freenode.net. We are having an Ubuntu Touch Porting Clinic today. So bring your device, your questions and we’ll help you get set up for the new image formats.

If you want your images to be supported by phablet-flash, that can be easily arranged too. Follow this process, to document how the flashing of your image works. Check out the latest branch of phablet-flash (not yet landed in trunk) to try out if your image works: lp:~sergiusens/phablet-tools/flash_change.

As always: if you have any questions, talk to us on #ubuntu-touch on irc.freenode.net or on the ubuntu-phone mailing list.

Update: now it’s just
bzr branch lp:phablet-tools; cd phablet-tools
./phablet-flash community --device <vendor>

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Daniel Holbach

The unstoppable Sergio Schvezov is working on bug 1201811 right now. Once it’s fixed this should put is into a position where users of devices for which we have Ubuntu Touch images (and not just the four devices we supported right from the start) can just use phablet-flash. This doesn’t mean that they are “officially supported” or that they’re built daily in the Canonical data centre, but that you can make use of the images much more easily.

Over time we still want to build more images in the data centre in a regular fashion. One of the big blockers there has been information about the redistributability of firwmare, blobs and closed kernel modules. If you have information about the licenses any of these, it’d be great if you could help with updating the Touch device pages.

On Thursday, 1st August we are going to hold a Ubuntu Touch Porting Clinic in #ubuntu-touch on irc.freenode.net where you will be able to ask all the questions you have and our local experts can help you with updating your image(s) to the new world order. We hope to see you there!

Ubuntu Touch

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Daniel Holbach

Some weeks ago I wrote a blog post and shared a personal view on Ubuntu’s history as a project. In there I explained (among other things) my view that Ubuntu as a project has quite often taken hard decisions to bring something new and exciting to people. The goal always was the same: bring open source in a beautiful form to as many people as possible. If I look around me today, it’s just beautiful to see what we’ve achieved. In conversations it’s easy for me to explain what I work on, almost everybody has heard of Ubuntu or Linux or Open Source. Lots of people, even folks outside the tech scene, try out Ubuntu every day, and are quite happy with what we brought to the table.

In recent months we drastically increased the pace though. It’s amazing to see how many teams work on the phone, on porting, on our app story and on making one Ubuntu happen across all kinds of devices. My gut feeling was that with every new video showing off another new working part, the buzz and excitement grew. “We actually can pull this off” seems to be the message everyone is getting. It makes me proud being part of this and happy to see that this is coming to fruition.

Starting the Ubuntu Edge project was another bold move in this regard. Not only working with carriers and hardware manufacturers on bringing out a device running Ubuntu, which is already fantastic on its own terms, but getting out a high-end device which showcases our vision for a converged device, seems to have excited many people around the globe. Press coverage, comments on blog posts and the incredible amounts of backers in such short time all seem to say “CAN’T WAIT!”.

If you are excited about “one Ubuntu on all kinds of devices”, want to help make this a reality, consider pledging as well. If you are looking for a new phone anyway, one which you can use as your PC as well, consider pledging a bit more. This is totally going to be worth it. :-)

(Can’t see the video, click here.)

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