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Posts tagged with 'hackfest'

pitti

I’m on my way home from Düsseldorf where I attended the LinuxCon Europe and Linux Plumber conferences. I was quite surprised how huge LinuxCon was, there were about 1.500 people there! Certainly much more than last year in New Orleans.

Containers (in both LXC and docker flavors) are the Big Thing everybody talks about and works with these days; there was hardly a presentation where these weren’t mentioned at all, and (what felt like) half of the presentations were either how to improve these, or how to use these technologies to solve problems. For example, some people/companies really take LXC to the max and try to do everything in them including tasks which in the past you had only considered full VMs for, like untrusted third-party tenants. For example there was an interesting talk how to secure networking for containers, and pretty much everyone uses docker or LXC now to deploy workloads, run CI tests. There are projects like “fleet” which manage systemd jobs across an entire cluster of containers (distributed task scheduler) or like project-builder.org which auto-build packages from each commit of projects.

Another common topic is the trend towards building/shipping complete (r/o) system images, atomic updates and all that goodness. The central thing here was certainly “Stateless systems, factory reset, and golden images” which analyzed the common requirements and proposed how to implement this with various package systems and scenarios. In my opinion this is certainly the way to go, as our current solution on Ubuntu Touch (i. e. Ubuntu’s system-image) is far too limited and static yet, it doesn’t extend to desktops/servers/cloud workloads at all. It’s also a lot of work to implement this properly, so it’s certainly understandable that we took that shortcut for prototyping and the relatively limited Touch phone environment.

On Plumbers my main occupations were mostly the highly interesting LXC track to see what’s coming in the container world, and the systemd hackfest. On the latter I was again mostly listening (after all, I’m still learning most of the internals there..) and was able to work on some cleanups and improvements like getting rid of some of Debian’s patches and properly run the test suite. It was also great to sync up again with David Zeuthen about the future of udisks and some particular proposed new features. Looks like I’m the de-facto maintainer now, so I’ll need to spend some time soon to review/include/clean up some much requested little features and some fixes.

All in all a great week to meet some fellows of the FOSS world a gain, getting to know a lot of new interesting people and projects, and re-learning to drink beer in the evening (I hardly drink any at home :-P).

If you are interested you can also see my raw notes, but beware that there are mostly just scribbling.

Now, off to next week’s Canonical meeting in Washington, DC!

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pitti

Yesterday, GUADEC hosted a PyGObject hackfest. I was really happy to see so many participants, and a lot of whom who are rather new to the project. I originally feared that it would just be the core crew of four people, as this is not exactly the shiniest part of GNOME development.

So I did not work on the stuff I was planning for, but instead walked around and provided mentoring, help, and patch review. Unfortunately I do not know all the results from the participants, hopefully they will blog some details themselves. But this is what I was involved in:

  • Manuel Quiñones added an gtk_tree_view_column_set_attributes() override (the original C function uses varargs and thus is not introspectable). Most time was spent figuring out an appropriate test case.
  • I showed Didier Roche some tricks about porting a pygtk application to PyGI/GTK3. He gave a shot to porting Meld, but unfortunately it uses a lot of pygtk hacks/tricks, most of which are obsolete now. So this proved too big a project for one day eventually :-(
  • Paolo and I guided Marta Maria Casetti, one of this year’s GNOME GSoC students, through her first pygobject patch. The test case still needs some love (again, nothing regarding GtkTreeView is easy), but the actual patch is good. Thanks Marta for participating, and not getting intimidated by all the new stuff!
  • While working on above patch, Marta encountered a rather curious TypeError: Expected Gtk.TreeViewColumn, but got GObjectMeta when writing the override. What seemed to be a trivial problem at first quickly turned into an one-hour debugging session involving grandmaster John Palmieri and me, with others chipping in as well. In the end it (of course!) turned out to be a trivial four-character change in Marta’s patch, but it was fun to get to understand the problem (a loong-forgotten special case of overrides resolution in overrides code). Now pygobject gives a proper error message which is actually helpful, i. e. which argument causes the problem and which module/class/method is provided, which should prevent us from being misguided into the totally wrong direction the next time this happens.
  • John Stowers got the Windows build working again, and showed off the gtk-demo under Windows. This is really amazing, I hope we can get that into trunk soon and not let it bitrot again for so long. Thanks!
  • Simon and Manuel worked on porting some Sugar extensions. Together with Paolo we also discussed the GStreamer 1.0 API a bit, which parts can become API additions and which need to become overrides.
  • Michal Hruby debugged a leak in the handling of GVariant arrays when using libdee.

Thanks everyone for participating! I hope everyone enjoyed it and got to learn a new thing or two. See you at the next one!

PyGObject hackfest at GUADEC 2012

PyGObject hackfest at GUADEC 2012

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pitti

I started to collect some easy PyGObject bugs which are appropriate for the PyGObject hackfest at GUADEC on July 30th. These are bugs which do not need a lot of previous knowlege and are excellent starters for new contributors, such as adding overrides, fixing build system issues, etc.

I also created an initial idea pool/agenda/coordination page, where participants can add or signup for things to work on.

Feel free to add your own topics! I’m really looking forward to GUADEC and the hackfest, see you there!

GUADEC 2012

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pitti

I just received confirmation that my request for a PyGObject hackfest has been approved by the GUADEC organizers.

If you are developing GObject-introspection based Python applications and have some problems with PyGObject, this is the time and place to get to know each other, getting bugs fixed, learn about pygobject’s innards, or update libraries to become introspectable. I will prepare a list of easy things to look into if you are interested in learning about and getting involved in PyGObject’s development.

See you on July 30th in A Coruña!

GUADEC Badge

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pitti

(Update: Link to Tomeu’s blog post, repost for planet.gnome.org)

Last week I was in Prague to attend the GNOME/Python 2011 Hackfest for gobject-introspection, to which Tomeu Vizoso kindly invited me after I started working with PyGI some months ago. It happened at a place called brmlab which was quite the right environment for a bunch of 9 hackers: Some comfy couches and chairs, soldering irons, lots of old TV tubes, chips, and other electronics, a big Pirate flag, really good Wifi, plenty of Club Mate and Coke supplies, and not putting unnecessary effort into mundane things like wallpapers.

It was really nice to get to know the upstream experts John (J5) Palmieri and Tomeu Vizoso (check out Tomeu’s blog post for his summary and some really nice photos). When sitting together in a room, fully focussing on this area for a full week, it’s so much easier to just ask them about something and getting things done and into upstream than on IRC or bugzilla, where you don’t know each other personally. I certainly learned a lot this week (and not only how great Czech beer tastes :-) )!

So what did I do?

Application porting

After already having ported four Ubuntu PyGTK applications to GI before (apport, jockey, aptdaemon, and language-selector),
my main goal and occupation during this week was to start porting a bigger PyGTK application. I picked system-config-printer, as it’s two magnitudes bigger than the previous projects, exercises quite a lot more of the GTK GI bindings, and thus also exposes a lot more GTK annotation and pygobject bugs. This resulted in a new pygi s-c-p branch which has the first 100 rounds of “test, break, fix” iterations. It now at least starts, and you can do a number of things with it, but a lot of functionality is still broken.

As a kind of “finger exercise” and also to check for how well pygi-convert works for small projects now, I also ported computer-janitor. This went really well (I had it working after about 30 minutes), and also led me to finally fixing the unicode vs. str mess for GtkTreeView that you got so far with Python 2.x.

pygobject and GTK fixes

Porting system-config-printer and computer-janitor uncovered a lot of opportunities to improve pygi-convert.sh, a big “perl -e” kind of script to do the mechanical grunt work of the porting process. It doesn’t fix up changed signatures (such as adding missing arguments which were default arguments in PyGTK, or the ubiquitous “user_data” argument for signal handlers), but at least it gets a lot of namespaces, method, and constant names right.

I also fixed three annotation fixes in GTK+. We also collaboratively reviewed and tested Pavel’s annotation branch which helped to fix tons of problems, especially after Steve Frécinaux’s excellent reference leak fix, so if you play around with current pygobject git head, you really also have to use the current GTK+ git head.

Speaking of which, if you want to port applications and always stay on top of the pygobject/GTK development without having to clutter your package system with “make install”s of those, it works very well to have this in your ~/.bashrc:

export GI_TYPELIB_PATH=$HOME/projects/gtk/gtk:$HOME/projects/gtk/gdk
export PYTHONPATH=$HOME/projects/pygobject

Better GVariant/GDBus support

The GNOME world is moving from the old dbus-glib python bindings to GDBus, which is integrated into GLib. However, dbus-python exposed a really nice and convenient way of doing D-Bus calls, while using GDBus from Python was hideously complicated, especially for nontrivial arguments with empty or nested arrays:

from gi.repository import Gio, GLib
from gi._gi import variant_type_from_string

d = Gio.bus_get_sync(Gio.BusType.SESSION, None)
notify = Gio.DBusProxy.new_sync(d, 0, None, 'org.freedesktop.Notifications',
    '/org/freedesktop/Notifications', 'org.freedesktop.Notifications', None)

vb = GLib.VariantBuilder()
vb.init(variant_type_from_string('r'))
vb.add_value(GLib.Variant('s', 'test'))
vb.add_value(GLib.Variant('u', 1))
vb.add_value(GLib.Variant('s', 'gtk-ok'))
vb.add_value(GLib.Variant('s', 'Hello World!'))
vb.add_value(GLib.Variant('s', 'Subtext'))
# add an empty array
eavb = GLib.VariantBuilder()
eavb.init(variant_type_from_string('as'))
vb.add_value(eavb.end())
# add an empty dict
eavb = GLib.VariantBuilder()
eavb.init(variant_type_from_string('a{sv}'))
vb.add_value(eavb.end())
vb.add_value(GLib.Variant('i', 10000))
args = vb.end()

result = notify.call_sync('Notify', args, 0, -1, None)
id = result.get_child_value(0).get_uint32()
print id

So I went to making the GLib.Variant constructor work properly with nested types and boxed variants, adding Pythonic GVariant iterators and indexing (so that you can treat GVariant dictionaries/arrays/tuples just like their Python equivalents), and finally a Variant.unpack() method for converting the return value of a D-Bus call back into a native Python data type. This looks a lot friendlier now:

from gi.repository import Gio, GLib

d = Gio.bus_get_sync(Gio.BusType.SESSION, None)
notify = Gio.DBusProxy.new_sync(d, 0, None, 'org.freedesktop.Notifications',
    '/org/freedesktop/Notifications', 'org.freedesktop.Notifications', None)

args = GLib.Variant('(susssasa{sv}i)', ('test', 1, 'gtk-ok', 'Hello World!',
    'Subtext', [], {}, 10000))
result = notify.call_sync('Notify', args, 0, -1, None)
id = result.unpack()[0]
print id

I also prepared another patch in GNOME#640181 which will provide the icing on the cake, i. e. handle the variant building/unpacking transparently and make the explicit call_sync() unnecessary:

from gi.repository import Gio, GLib

d = Gio.bus_get_sync(Gio.BusType.SESSION, None)
notify = Gio.DBusProxy.new_sync(d, 0, None, 'org.freedesktop.Notifications',
    '/org/freedesktop/Notifications', 'org.freedesktop.Notifications', None)

result = notify.Notify('(susssasa{sv}i)', 'test', 1, 'gtk-ok', 'Hello World!',
            'Subtext', [], {}, 10000)
print result[0]

I hope that I can get this reviewed and land this soon.

Thanks to our sponsors!

Many thanks to the GNOME Foundation and Collabora for sponsoring this event!

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