Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'canonical'

beuno

A little while back, I hinted at us delivering new features for mobile phones, specifically Android and iPhone. Now that we're past the initial research, architecture and initial implementation phase, I'd like to share one of the new features we'll be releasing in Ubuntu 10.10: music streaming.

In Ubuntu 10.04, we released the music store, and to compliment that, we will be allowing you to stream any music you have in your Ubuntu One account to your iPhone or Android mobile phone. This feature will be bundled as part of the paid plan, although we are planning some re-structuring to that, yet to be announced.

We've chosen to base this new service on free software, and have picked Subsonic clients as our platform, implementing compatible APIs on our servers.
On the iPhone, Ben Baron, who develops the iSub client for that platform, has decided to open source the code for his application, enabling us to build our iPhone as an open source project. We can't thank him enough, for enabling that for us, you should try out iSub, it's an amazing application.

We hope to slowly start opening up the testing of the service before the 10.10 release, but more on that as we make progress.

More on our epic roadmap to 10.10 soon!

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beuno

We should have released the source for the iphone client right after we did the upload to the appstore, but a bunch of bureaucracy and crazy work deadlines postponed this until now.
We're going to be doing some work for the Ubuntu 10.10 release on the iphone client as well as on a new Android client, both clients are going to be open source, like all our other Ubuntu One clients.
We've created the projects on Launchpad, pushed the initial source code for the iphone client, and will start pushing Android as soon as we get out of the exploration stage.

The projects are available at:

iphone:  https://launchpad.net/ubuntuone-ios-client
android: https://launchpad.net/ubuntuone-android-client

Stay tuned for more on our new mobile services!

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beuno

A few months back the Ubuntu One team launched mobile contacts syncing, our first step into the mobile world. After a few initial rocky Beta days of cleaning up some scaling rough edges, it’s been a smooth ride since. It turned out to be a very popular service, which has us excited, and reinforced our eagerness to build more mobile services for Maverick.
While the full roadmap hasn’t been set in stone yet, we’ve had a lot of feedback about offering a separate, feature-rich mobile service at a lower price, as well as integration into Android.
We’ve decided to take on some of these challenges, and are committed to delivering more and more mobile services, some of which we will introduce around the Ubuntu Maverick release in October.

In the meantime, we’ve decided to extend the 30-day trial period for mobile contact sync until the Maverick release, where we will re-instate it as part of a bigger, juicier and with more native integration, mobile package.

This is effective now, so if you’ve signed up for our paid account exclusively for mobile sync, feel free to downgrade to the free plan, we will notify all mobile users before the 30-day trial is turned on again.

As we finish our research and initial development, we will announce the features that will be rolled out and probably open up for testing in our alpha phase to a small group of lucky people.

It seems to be the case every release, but, the future is exciting!

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beuno

We have very exciting and challenging plans for the future of the new web+mobile Ubuntu One team (more on this soon), and we’re looking for an exceptional web engineer to join us.

The summary for this position is:

We are looking for an exceptional engineer to work on Ubuntu One’s web infrastructure with a proven track record for exceptional problem solving and integration into third-party systems. This person should help the team design, build, and deploy web and mobile applications with a high degree of quality and passion. If you’re the type of person who gets excited about delivering cutting-edge technology to hundreds of thousands of users, in a lean and friendly environment, we are looking for you!

If this sounds like you, check out the full job description and send us your CV!

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beuno

After a few hiccups with our servers, Ubuntu One contact phone sync is open again for new accounts.

Check out the wiki with the instructions to get set up: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuOne/PhoneSync/

Sorry for the inconvenience, Slashdot still seems to be a mixed bag of pain and joy  :)

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beuno

While we slowly ramp up to release mobile phone contact sync, using my own contacts as test data I realized that once I had merged my phone’s address book and Thunderbird’s address book, I had quite a few contacts duplicated due to them having different names with different information in them. So I had one of those “you know what would be cool…?” kind of moments, and started working on a feature that would let me merge contacts on the web, saving me hours of copy-n-paste.
A few weeks later, an initial pass at that feature has rolled out!  Yay agile software development!

There are a few tweaks to the contacts interface, and you will see a new option:

So, for example, let’s pretend you have 2 contacts that are the same person but have an extra name in one of them, one of them has his phone number, the other, his email:

and

We go to our new merge feature and select both of them:

Finally, we get a preview of what this will look like:

Done!

Plans for the future are:

- Allow conflict resolution when the contact has 2 fields that are the same but have different values
- Allow editing the contact in the merge preview
- Allow merging from the contacts page instead of a separate page
- Use this same mechanism when conflicts arise in couchdb merging contacts
Also, contact syncing from thousands of mobile phones will be opened up for a public alpha very very very soon. Stay tuned!

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beuno

After a year and a half in the User Experience team at Canonical, I’ve decided to move to the Ubuntu One team. It’s been an amazing experience to be part of that team but I’ve been missing doing development on a regular basis a lot lately, so I’ve decided to move into a role where I can get my hands dirty more often.

I will start by taking on anything on the web interface together with an amazing team, we will deliver a great experience and a higher level of polish for Lucid. There are some exciting new features coming to Ubuntu One, so it’s a great time to be part of the team, especially with John Lenton and Elliot Murphy as managers.

This does mean I will be moving away from the work I’ve been doing on Launchpad which makes me sad, it’s a fantastic and ambitious project filled with the smartest and most passionate engineers I’ve known.

If in the next few months you don’t start feeling like life is getting better for you on the Ubuntu One web UI, please come and find me and point me and hold me up to my promise of wonderful webby things.

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beuno

All projects in Canonical have a strong focus on testing. From all of them, I think Bazaar ranks the highest on obsesiveness on testing. As a drive-by contributor, it always felt like a very high entry barrier, and deterred me from getting into complicated changes. It was only after I bit the bullet and got into more complicated changes (in Launchpad, actually) that I understood that tests where my best friends ever. It’s a safety net against myself, and actually lowers the barrier, because I don’t need to know about the rest of the code base to make a change, tests will tell me if I break something (seemingly) unrelated.

On the more extreme side, there is test driven development (TDD). You write the tests first, watch them fail, and then start producing the code that will get them to pass. Having co-authored bzr-upload with the TDD-obsessed bzr developer, Vincent Ladeuil, I thought that if I was going to add a new feature, I may just as well try it (again).

It rocked.

I set up the test, my carrot, and the task went from “start poking around code” to “fix this problem”. With the test written, it became very clear what parts of the code I needed to change, and how the feature had to work.

The results?  in one hour, I implemented a feature that lets you ignore specific files on upload. With tests.

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beuno

Following up on my last post about user testing icons, it has been incredibly successful!  We’ve had over 100 responses, and are now going through the data to put together a summary. I will post information on our findings as soon as we finish the work.

In the mean time, Charline Poirier, who is in charge of user testing in our team, has created another survey with 5 more icons to help us get more data. If everyone could give this survey another spin, and create some networking effects to help spread the survey to non-Launchpad users, it would be tremendously helpful to us. Here’s the link: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=6iwthaIT4FwPCsMPa1EDEA_3d_3d

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beuno

We’re trying to improve the icons we have in Launchpad so they’re more usable across different cultures and types of users, and our first step is to do some user testing on our current icons.

The Canonical User Experience team has set up a survey to gather information on how users see our icons, so if you have a few spare minutes (it’s very quick!), please take the survey and pass it on to other people, especially if they don’t use Launchpad, as they will be less biased.

Survey is available at: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=8hXmjrmFS7TmQCjh7jJB_2bQ_3d_3d

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beuno

As promised, Launchpad has been fully open sourced (as opposed to the initial idea, nothing has been held back). Get it now, fix your favorite pet bug, and improve tens thousands of people’s experience.

Mark Shuttleworth really deserves a lot of praise for this bold and brave move, open sourcing not only the code, but all  it’s history. It’s a fantastic day today.

Update: yes, fully means including soyuz and codehosting, Mark has decided to release everything. The whole history is there.

See the loggerhead page:

launchpad-open-source

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beuno

About a month ago, I went to Canonical’s office in London for a sprint, and made good use of my Sunday by visiting the National Gallery. One fantastic thing about London, is the fact that all museums are free, not just because otherwise a few years back I couldn’t of afforded going, but because the fact that they are free gives you the freedom of going to the same ones over and over again, and just calmly visit the bits you’re interested in.

As I was walking by, I saw a painting that really struck me. It was a terrible and dark dragon eating two men, one of them is in agony while it’s face is being eaten off. Quite shocking:

Two Followers of Cadmus devoured by a Dragon

After looking at it for a little while, I went closer to read the description of it, which unexpectedly shocked me ten times as much:

“This gruesome episode comes from the story of Cadmus which is told in Ovid’s ‘Metamorphoses’ (III: 1-151). Cadmus was sent by the Delphic oracle to follow a cow and build a town where it sank from exhaustion. The cow stopped on the future site of Thebes, and Cadmus, intending to sacrifice it, sent his followers to get water from the neighbouring well of Ares. They were killed by the guardian of the well, a dragon who was the son of Ares. Cadmus then killed the dragon and on the advice of Athena sowed its teeth in the ground, from which sprang up armed men who slew each other, with the exception of five who became the ancestors of the Thebans.”

This got me thinking on how much first impressions are important in the user experience, but really hit me how much more important the actual content is. We tend to relay the content creation and management to “the marketing folks”, when I feel it’s a crucial part that should be worked on together to balance off the amount of text, with the tone in which it’s written, and to ensure that we’re adding value to the users’ experience.

Yes, I’m starting to see UI everywhere.

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