Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'community'

jono

I just wanted to let you folks know that I am recruiting for a community manager to join my team at Canonical.

I am looking for someone with strong technical knowledge of building Ubuntu (knowledge of how we release, how we build packages, bug management, governance etc), great community management skills, and someone who is willing to be challenged and grow in their skills and capabilities.

My goal with everyone who joins my team is not just to help them be successful in their work, but to help them be the very best at what they do in our industry. As such I am looking for someone with a passion to be successful and grow.

I think it is a great opportunity and to be part of a great team. Details of the job are available here – please apply if you are interested!?

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jono

As some of you will know, I founded the Community Leadership Summit that takes place in Portland, Oregon every year. The event brings together community leaders, organizers and managers and the projects and organizations that are interested in growing and empowering a strong community. Each year we discuss, debate and continue to refine the art of building an effective and capable community, structured in a set of presentation and attendee-driven unconference sessions.

This year’s event is happening on 18th – 19th July 2014 (the two days before OSCON), and is shaping up to be a great event. We have over 180 people registered already, with a diverse and wide-ranging set of attendees. The event is free to attend, you just need to register first. We hope to see you there!

In a few weeks though we have an additional sister-event to the main Community Leadership Summit at the Open Source Think Tank.

The Community Leadership Summit and Open Source Think Tank have partnered to create a unique event designed for executives and managers involved in community management planning and strategic development. While the normal annual Community Leadership Summit serves practicing community managers and leaders well, this unique event is designed to be very focused on executives in a strategic leadership position to understand the value and process of building a community.

I have been wanting to coordinate a strategic leadership event such as this for some time, and the Think Tank is the perfect venue; it brings together executives across a wide range of Open Source organizations, and I will be delivering the Community Leadership Summit track as a key part of the event on the first day.

The event takes place on 24th March 2014 in Napa, California. See the event homepage for more details – I hope to see you there!

The track is shaping up well. We will have keynote sessions, break-out groups discussing gamification, metrics, hiring community managers, and more, a dedicated case study (based on a real organization with the identity anonymized) to exercise these skills and more.

If you want to join the Community Leadership Summit track at the Open Source Think Tank, please drop me an email as space is limited. I hope to see you there!

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jono

So, today we announced the Ubuntu App Showdown where you can build apps with the Ubuntu SDK and win some awesome prizes such as the Nexus 7 (2013) tablet and the Meizu MX3.

This got me thinking, which apps would a love to see on Ubuntu as part of the competition? Well, this is them, and hopefully they will be food for thought for some developers:

  • Email Client – this would be an email client that looks and functions like Discourse. With it you could connect to an IMAP/Gmail account, see mail as threads, reply to mails, create and send new emails etc. Bonus points for supporting multiple accounts.
  • Social Media Client – I haven’t found a Twitter and other social media client that works well for me. This one would show my timeline of tweets, have mentions on a different tab/screen, and support searches too. It would use the Online Accounts platform service to connect.
  • Google+ Client – I would love to see a G+ client that integrates neatly into Ubuntu. It would need to browse my timeline, show notifications, let me reply to posts and add +1s, and browse communities.
  • Ubuntu LoCo Teams App – an app where I can view the content from loco.ubuntu.com such as browsing teams, seeing current and up-coming events, browse the blog, and include the content in the Ubuntu Advocacy Kit. The power in this app would be looking like a beautiful app that any LoCo member can use to find cool events and do interesting things.
  • Riff Recorder – an audio recording app where I can adjust the volume of the mic (for when I am in a room with lots of noise such as a rehearsal) and then record the audio at that level and have the ability to share it somewhere.

If anyone manages to build these apps, you will make me a very happy man. :-)

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jono

Today we launched our next Ubuntu App Showdown.

The idea is simple: you have six weeks to build an application with the Ubuntu SDK that converges across both phone and tablet (which is simple). We have the following categories, each of which has a prize:

  • QML – a native app written in QML (wins a Nexus 7 (2013) tablet).
  • HTML5 – a native app written in HTML5 (wins a Nexus 7 (2013) tablet).
  • Ported – an app that has been ported from another platform to Ubuntu and used the Ubuntu SDK (wins a Nexus 7 (2013) tablet).

We are also delighted to include an additional category with two prizes sponsored by Meizu:

  • Chinese – an app that is written in either QML or HTML5 that would be of most interest to Chinese users, such as connecting to Chinese sites and services (2 x Meizu MX3s as prizes).

If you would like to get involved in the showdown, you can find out all the details here or for our Chinese friends here.

HTML5 Refinements

In preperation for the showdown we have also landed a number of significant improvements to HTML5 in the Ubuntu SDK. This includes:

  • Our HTML5 technology has been fully revamped and now all works from a single container.
  • A new single default template for creating your HTML5 app.
  • Full access to device sensors via cordova.
  • Full access to platform APIs via Javascript.
  • API documentation.
  • A brand new HTML5 section on developer.ubuntu.com complete with new guides, tutorials, API docs, and more.

Remember, we award extra point for blogging about and sharing on social media about your app and how it is developing, so be sure to share your work! Good luck!

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jono

Ten years ago today we started LugRadio. For those of you who don’t know what LugRadio was, it was a podcast that some friends and I did that took a loose, fun, and eclectic look at Open Source and Linux. It developed a bit of a cult following to the point where 40+ people still hang out in the #lugradio channel today.

A am proud of what we achieved with LugRadio. Over 100 shows, 7 full-time presenters and countless guest presenters, 200+ hours of audio, 100+ guests, 2million+ downloads, multiple awards, 1000+ forums members, 40000+ forums posts, 6 live events in two countries, 5000+ emails to the show and an incredible community of people who surrounded the show, discussed it, got involved in some way, and otherwise gave us all immense enthusiasm to keep doing it.

I remember the day I started discussing the idea with Stuart Langridge, stood in my kitchen in Wolverhampton after a Linux User Group meeting, and I don’t think either of us would have ever dreamed of how far it went.

If you want to get a good idea of the show, check out the excellent documentary about LugRadio called Don’t Listen Alone by Tony Whitmore.

Although LugRadio is now wedged in the historical record, the good news is that there is a new kid on the block in the form of Bad Voltage.

Much is the same as with LugRadio (four presenters, show every two weeks, a focus on informative but entertaining content) but we don’t just limit the show to Linux and Open Source and we also cover technology, politics, gaming, and more. Check it out here.

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jono

This last weekend I was in LA at SCALE12x and gave a presentation providing a detailed update of much of the work going on as we build a convergent Ubuntu. As I have mentioned before, there is lots of other foundational pieces being built as part of this work (app insulation, SDK, click packages, developer.ubuntu.com, platform services etc), and this presentation covered where we stand today in this work.

Obviously a lot more of you couldn’t be at SCALE than couldn’t, so I have recorded the presentation to share online. You can see it below or click here to watch it. Enjoy!

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jono

The Ubuntu Developer Summit is the primary place where we discuss, debate, and plan the future of Ubuntu. The entire event takes place online, is open and accessible to all, and every session is recorded so everyone can see how decisions are made. It is a useful, fun, and rewarding event to join.

My apologies for the delay in announcing the next event. The last few months have been somewhat hectic and we wanted to wait for some confirmed conference/sprint dates across Ubuntu Engineering and cross-check those with our release schedule before committing to final dates so we can ensure as many people are there as possible.

I can now confirm that our next Ubuntu Developer Summit will take place from Tues 11th March 2014 – Thurs 13th March 2014. I wanted to let you all know ASAP so you can get it in your calendars. summit.ubuntu.com is updated and ready to start having sessions added or proposed.

This next UDS will look and feel much like the last one; the same tracks and format. The feedback we have received from the last UDS suggests that the changes we made were well received. As ever, your feedback is always welcome.

If you want to have a session at UDS, please see this guide for how to propose it. As usual, feel free to ask for help from myself or Michael Hall, David Planella, or Daniel Holbach,

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jono

We are growing a world-class community and app developer eco-system, fuelled by Open Source and open collaboration. We are putting the core pieces in place and I am delighted to be working with such a wonderful team:

(L-R) Daniel Holbach, Kyle Nitzsche, Michael Hall, This Guy, Nicholas Skaggs, Alan Pope, David Planella

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jono

As some of you will know, I founded the Community Leadership Summit that takes place in Portland, Oregon every year. The event brings together community leaders, organizers and managers and the projects and organizations that are interested in growing and empowering a strong community. Each year we discuss, debate and continue to refine the art of building an effective and capable community, structured in a set of presentation and attendee-driven unconference sessions.

This year’s event is happening on 18th – 19th July 2014 (the two days before OSCON), and is shaping up to be a great event. We have over 140 people registered already, with a diverse and wide-ranging set of attendees. The event is free to attend, you just need to register first. We hope to see you there!

The Think Tank Community Leadership Summit

This year I am also excited to announce an additional sister-event to the main Community Leadership Summit at the Open Source Think Tank.

The Community Leadership Summit and Open Source Think Tank have partnered to create a unique event designed for executives and managers involved in community management planning and strategic development. While the normal annual Community Leadership Summit serves practicing community managers and leaders well, this unique event is designed to be very focused on executives in a strategic leadership position to understand the value and process of building a community.

I have been wanting to coordinate a strategic leadership event such as this for some time, and the Think Tank is the perfect venue; it brings together executives across a wide range of Open Source organizations, and I will be delivering the Community Leadership Summit track as a key part of the event on the first day.

The event will be in the form of a day of presentations and sessions that cover many of the considerations when building a community management strategy, and these approaches will be exercised in a practical and interactive case study. The conclusions from the event will then feed into the rest of the Think Tank. I am excited to get started and I am confident the event will be tremendously valuable for attendees, particularly in an age when a community management strategy is more and more of a core requirement.

The event takes place on 24th March 2014 in Napa, California. See the event homepage for more details – I hope to see you there!

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jono

Recently Randall did some research into what people want to see on Planet Ubuntu. This has been followed up by Stuart with a set of concerns.

I agree with both of them.

I think the gist of Randall’s view is that he would like to encourage more fun, interesting, and diverse Ubuntu-related content. I think Randall wants to see fun stories of LoCo events, interesting Ubuntu work going on, cool Ubuntu apps, details of new features, and more. I agree with Randall here, and would love to see the same.

I think the gist of Stuart’s view is that the personal stories on Planet Ubuntu is a wonderful part of being in a community. Ubuntu is not just about Ubuntu, it is about the stories and the lives of the people who contribute to our community. I agree with Stuart here too.

I think we need a mix. Ideally we want to see interesting posts about people’s contributions to Ubuntu, but also about their non-Ubuntu lives too.

I would like to see Planet Ubuntu stick to its core goal: to be a place where you can look into the lives of Ubuntu members and explore their Ubuntu work as well as their non-Ubuntu thoughts and views.

The problem here is really with Ubuntu membership. Some people are still Ubuntu members who haven’t contributed to Ubuntu for a long time and thus we see lots of non-Ubuntu content, but rarely hear about their contributions. I would recommend we deactivate membership for those who are not actively contributing (active being significant and sustained contributions, as per our charter); this will then tighten up which feeds appear on planet and we will get a nice mix of both Ubuntu and person content.

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jono

On Accountability

Every so often I see a scenario play out that I find rather disappointing.

It works like this: someone posts a topic to their blog that is critical or controversial. This person can either be a community member, commentator, employee or otherwise; it doesn’t matter who the person is. Then what happens is a series of comments are posted to that blog entry from readers that are critical of the post, thus challenging the author on their views. The author then either deletes the blog entry or disables the comments based on the feedback. In other words, a viewpoint is shared, an invitation for comment is provided, but that invitation is then revoked when the author of the blog post is dissatisfied with the response from their readers.

I have seen this happen countless times over the years and I don’t like this.

I believe we should all be accountable for our words. Our words have the ability to inspire, to entertain, to challenge, but to also hurt. Actions have consequences, and so do words.

As such, when I see someone openly share their thoughts on their blog and invite their readers to provide comments, I see that as a wonderful demonstration of accountability and engagement; debate is a beautiful thing when executed with politeness and respect. To then close that door, seemingly because people disagree with you, is in my mind the equivalent of walking out of a room in the middle of a debate. The excuse when folks are criticized of this behavior is typically “it is my blog and I can run it how I like“.

This is true: it is your blog, and you can run it how you like, but the true measure of a person is not just in what they say, but also in the conversation and discourse that follows.

Now, there are two very important caveats to my view here. Firstly, abusive, threatening, or otherwise offensive content is a perfect candidate for removal and the commentator for banning. We should never tolerate this. Secondly, I can understand the removal of a blog post if there is a legal requirement to do so. In the majority of cases where I have seen posts removed or comments disabled though, it has been for neither of these reasons.

Speaking personally, I have never, ever, switched off comments on my blog posts or deleted posts. Even when the Internet has seemingly come to get me, or when the press pick up on something and are critical, or when I have made a mistake and felt embarrassed at the outcome…I have never switched off comments and never deleted a blog post. This is because I feel I should be and I am accountable for my words.

For me, this is an ethical issue; in the same way I won’t go and re-write or edit a blog post if I get criticism for it (outside of minor grammatical/spelling fixes). My posts are a time-capsule of my thinking at that point in my life. For me to go and edit them would be me re-writing history. A blog is not a regularly updated record of your views (like a book), it is chronological diary of your views and progression as a person. Consequently, my blog is filled with moments from my past that don’t reflect my views, experience, or ideas of today. Some of those posts are even embarrassing. But you know what, those posts stay unchanged, and I am proud that I have never compromised on this accountability.

So with this in mind, I have a simple suggestion for those of you who run blogs: either switch your comments off entirely or always leave them on, but don’t turn them off when you don’t like the reaction from your readers. Polite and respectful debate helps us grow as human beings, helps us evolve our ideas and perspectives, and makes us better people. Let history be our record, not our edited version of history.

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jono

I am delighted to announce the Community Leadership Summit 2014, now in it’s sixth year! This year it takes place on the 18th and 19th July 2014, the weekend before OSCON at the Oregon Convention Center. Thanks again to O’Reilly for providing the venue.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the CLS, it is an entirely free event designed to bring together community leaders and managers and the projects and organizations that are interested in growing and empowering a strong community. The event provides an unconference style schedule in which attendees can discuss, debate and explore topics. This is augmented with a range of scheduled talks, panel discussions, networking opportunities and more.

The heart of CLS is an event driven by the attendees, for the attendees.

The event provides an opportunity to bring together the leading minds in the field with new community builders to discuss topics such as governance, creating collaborative environments, conflict resolution, transparency, open infrastructure, social networking, commercial investment in community, engineering vs. marketing approaches to community leadership and much more.

The previous events have been hugely successful and a great way to connect together different people from different community backgrounds to share best practice and make community management an art and science better understood and shared by us all.

I will be providing more details about the event closer to the time, but in the meantime be sure to register!

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jono

On Monday 13th Jan starting at 6pm UTC (10am Pacific / 1pm Eastern) I will be doing an AMA on Reddit. For those unfamiliar with this – this is where you can ask me anything on Reddit, and the most popular questions and responses are up/down voted.

The post will go live about 30mins before that time so you can start adding questions.

I welcome questions about absolutely anything to do with Ubuntu, Canonical, community management, working in the Open Source industry, writing books, podcasting, free culture, heavy metal, moving from England to America, or anything else. Let’s have some fun!

For those of you who are unfamiliar with my work, I work at Canonical as the Ubuntu Community Manager, I am the author of The Art of Community by O’Reilly, founder of the annual Community Leadership Summit, and have spoken around the world about community leadership and encouraging people to get together to create awesome things.

Outside of my work, I co-founded the Bad Voltage, Lugradio, and Shot Of Jaq podcasts, founded the Creative Commons metal band Severed Fifth, wrote an archive of Creative Commons music, built the BBQ website BBQpad, write for various magazines (Linux Format / Ubuntu User), and have contributed to various Open Source projects.

I will follow up on Twitter/Google+ with a link to the thread when it is published.

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jono

Recently the Ubuntu newswires have been buzzing with the news that we have won our first smartphone partner.

Now, let’s get the elephant in the room out of the way – I am not telling you who it is. It is not my place here to share confidential details about business-to-business relationships such as this. Rest assured though, I know the folks working on these relationships and there is a tremendous amount of opportunity for Ubuntu in these discussions; OEMs, carriers, ISVs and more are very interested in exploring Ubuntu for future products.

This is…spoiler alert…fantastic news.

But what does this news really mean for Ubuntu, and to what extent do our community play a part? Let’s dig into this a little bit.

I joined Ubuntu because I want to help an effort to bring technological elegance and freedom to people. Both of these are essential; elegant proprietary software and complex Free Software are both limited in the opportunities they bring to people and who can harness them. A good balance of both is what we strive to achieve in Ubuntu.

For many years Ubuntu has been available to download and install on your computer. Today you can download Ubuntu for your desktop computer, phone, tablet, and you can deploy it to your public or private cloud.


Soon.

While this provides a reliable distribution point for those in the know, it remains an unknown service for those not in the know. Put simply: most normal people don’t do this. People like you and me, who read nerdy blogs like mine, often do this.

Now, we often talk about how we have around 20million Ubuntu users. To be fair, this will always be something of an informed estimation (made up from sales, downloads etc). As an example, if one person downloads Ubuntu they may install it on one computer. Alternatively, they could do the kind of work that Project Community Computers and Partimus do and use that download to install Ubuntu on hundreds of computers that potentially thousands of people will use. Again, put simply, it is difficult to get a firm idea of current numbers of users.

Irrespective though, whatever figure we have…such as 20million…this number is fundamentally defined by our available distribution mechanisms. The formula here is simple: if we increase the opportunity for Ubuntu to be distributed, we get more users…

…and this is where the chain reaction begins.


Wrong chain reaction.

If we have more users, we get more ISVs such as Adobe, Autodesk, Zynga, Rovio and others who want to use Ubuntu as a channel. If we get more apps from ISVs we get more interest from OEMs, carriers, and others. If we get more OEMs and carriers, we get more enterprise, creative-industry, and educational deployments. If we get more deployments we see more businesses selling support, services, training, people writing books, seminars, and other areas of focus. This effectively creates an eco-system around Ubuntu which in turn lowers the bar enough that any consumer can use and try it…thus putting Free Software in the hands of the masses.

Put simply once more: if we make Ubuntu commercially successful, it will put Free Software in the hands of more people.

Now, on the desktop side of things we have Ubuntu pre-installed on four of the largest OEMs on the planet, and while industry-wide annual PC shipments are dropping more and more each year, fortunately, we have positioned ourselves in a sweet spot. We can continue to fulfill our position as the third most popular Operating System for desktop/laptop computers, while providing a simple on-ramp to bring Ubuntu to these other devices as part of our wider convergence story.

As such, our first commercial smartphone partner is where we light the touch-paper that starts that chain reaction. This is good for Ubuntu, consumers, app developers, small businesses selling services, and for other OEMs/carriers who are exploring Ubuntu. All of this is good for Free Software.

So where does the community fit into this? Surely all of this work is going to be the domain of paid Canonical engineers delivering whatever the secret smartphone partner wants?


Recent Canonical sprint at the Marriott City Center, Oakland

Not at all.

Delivering a shippable device has many different technology components: hardware enablement, display server (Mir), shell (Unity 8), developer platform and SDK, core applications that ship with the device, quality assurance, language packs, third-party scopes and services, and more.

This is just what sits on the device. Outside of it we also need effective governance, event planning, local user group advocacy and campaigns, app developer growth and support, general documentation and support, web and communications services, accessibility, and more.

Every one of these areas (with the probable exception of specifically working with customers around enabling their specific device) welcomes and needs our community to help. Some of these areas are better set up collaboratively with our community than others…but not working collaboratively with our community is a bug, not a feature.

Believe me when I say there is no shortage of things for us to do. We have a long but exciting road ahead of us, and I am looking at my team to help support our community in finding something fun, rewarding, and productive to work on. There are few things in life more satisfying than putting your brick in the wall as part of a global effort to bring technological change to people. I hope you are joining us for the ride.

If you want to help and get stuck, email me at jono@ubuntu.com. I am happy to help get you started.

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jono

Free Software is not just software or a philosophical attitude to freely available software. Free Software is a catalyst for change in a constantly evolving world that is becoming more and more dependent on technology. Unfortunately while many of us are getting faster and faster computers on our desktops and in our pockets, for many the digital divide is ever wide as it has always been.

I have always had a soft spot for those organizations who selflessly bring Free Software to those for whom technology is a missing link in their lives. I spent two years doing this with OpenAdvantage before I joined Canonical, bringing technology to a region where many manual labourers were out of work and needing access to technology and training to upskill and get new jobs to support their families. Likewise groups like A2RT, FreeGeek, Partimus and more doing similar great work.

When I was speaking at Ohio Linux Fest earlier this year I met the Project Community Computers. Emma from System76 told me they wanted to talk to me about their project (they use Ubuntu extensively across their projects) so I had a meeting with them. The project essentially takes Ubuntu and puts it on recycled computers and they have set up over 20 educational labs around the world.

All out of their own pocket. All on their own time.

I was blown away by their accomplishments.

The guys are smart, selfless, motivated, and harnessing the truest power of Free Software…to break down the digital divide. They are not just talking a big game…they are playing a big game with so many accomplishments so far. It is projects like this why I got involved in Free Software and Ubuntu in the first place.

The team were looking for opportunities for funding their continued work and I suggested they crowd-fund it, an idea that they had already thought about, so I am delighted to see they have kicked their campaign off at http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/project-community-computers.

See their campaign video below:

Project: Community Computers Indiegogo Campaign Launch Video from Project: Community Computers on Vimeo.

Can’t see it? See it here!

Please go and invest in this tremendous team and project; I have no doubt that every penny will be put to good use.

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jono

I have talked in the past about how critical I feel app developers are to the Ubuntu convergence story. If developers can go from idea to implementation to publishing quickly and easily, it will make the overall Ubuntu platform more attractive and featureful for users, partners, OEMs, carriers and more.

As such, we are working hard to make Ubuntu a platform where you can match your creativity with the tools you need to deliver your creative vision to others. This has included a powerful SDK, a simple and effective app upload process, a new version of developer.ubuntu.com that will be landing next week, and more.

Now we are finalizing much of the core infrastructure (SDK, docs, knowledge, support, publishing) I really want to focus more and more on widening the awareness of Ubuntu as a powerful and fun developer platform.

There are all kinds of things we can do – video tutorials, training weeks, local tutorial schools, app contests, and more, and we are really keen to hear your ideas and look for those who want to help spread the word about Ubuntu as a powerful converged developer platform.

How Do I Help?

If you are interested in helping, we are looking for ideas on this pad; you will need to be a member of this team to edit, so be sure to join that team first. Feel free to braindump your ideas for ways in which we can get out to more developers and help them realize their creative ideas. The more ideas the better!

Then, on Tuesday 24th Sep at 3pm UTC, we will be running a live Google+ Hangout meeting on Ubuntu On Air to review the ideas and start making plans. If you add an idea to the pad it would be awesome if you could join the session too.

I would love to encourage you all to join and help build the developer platform of the future across phones, desktops, tablets, and more!

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jono

Some time ago we announced Mir; a thin, efficient, multi form-factor display server that will form the foundation of Ubuntu moving forward across desktops, phones, tablets, and TVs.

Our goal has been clear that in Ubuntu 13.10 we will include Mir by default for cards that support it and fall back to X for cards that don’t (primarily those that require proprietary graphics drivers). In 14.04 we will deploy Mir but not provide the X fallback mode, and we are in active discussions with GPU manufacturers for them to support Mir in their drivers.

I wanted to provide an update on the progress we have been making with Mir.

Mir is in Ubuntu 13.10

The Mir team have been working hard to get Mir ready and in the archive ready for Feature Freeze on the 29th August. I am pleased to report that Mir is now available in the Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy archive and available for use.

Now, there are a few caveats here:

  • Multi-monitor support has not fully landed yet, as such you will only see mirrored displays and possibly some bugs. This support should land around the 22nd August. Keep up to date with the blueprint for this feature.
  • Although performance in Mir is very usable, the team are working on composite bypass support that will bring enhanced performance benefits. This should also land around the 22nd August.
  • Mir is naturally still under heavy development, so don’t consider it finished quite yet. ;-) The team will be focusing on bug-fixing and performance optimizations when the primary feature development is completed.

Good progress is being across all fronts with Mir and we are on track for our Ubuntu 13.10 commitment. As part of this work we have also been providing weekly Mir engineering updates as part of our Weekly Ubuntu Update videocast, so you can get a clear weekly idea of current status.

Mir in Ubuntu Touch

With the furious progress being made, we are expecting Mir to land in the daily Ubuntu Touch images in the next week. This means that those of you using Ubuntu Touch on your phones and tablets will have Mir running on your device soon. To get this, simply upgrade as normal.

Test Mir in Ubuntu 13.10 Desktop

Anyone is able to run the development version of Ubuntu 13.10 by installing the latest daily ISO and although Mir isn’t switched on by default yet, it is available you can test it by running:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install mir-demos unity-system-compositor

Now to be clear: if Mir is working you should see no graphical difference from your normal system. Mir exists underneath your desktop environment, so you should just see your desktop as normal.

We are going to be kicking off a series of Mir testing campaigns in the coming weeks, but right now I would like to encourage you folks to install Mir and start your system as normal and test it is running with:

ps ax | grep "unity"

You should see a line with unity-system-compositor listed. If you see this you are running Mir! If you see this and your desktop works as normal, this is considered a success.

If you have a proprietary graphics driver (e.g. some Nvidia/ATI cards) and you run the above command and don’t see a unity-system-compositor entry then the system correctly fell back to X and this is considered a success.

If the system doesn’t display graphics or you see a line with unity-system-compositor and you see significant performance or tearing issues, this is considered a failure.

I created this wiki page to track how Mir works on different graphics cards. Please add your graphics card (if it isn’t already covered) and whether Mir was a success or failure.

If you do have problems with Mir and want to start a normal X server, simply edit /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d/10-unity-system-compositor.conf and comment out the second and third lines:

[SeatDefaults]
#type=unity
#unity-compositor-command=unity-system-compositor.sleep

Now restart LightDM and you are good to go. Uncomment these lines to go back to Mir.

Mir Ecosystem

In the last few weeks we have been having some wonderful discussions with those who are actively interested in utilizing Mir. This has included:

  • Active discussions with the GPU manufacturors. These discussions are under NDA so unfortunately I cannot share more at this time, but the discussions are active and on-going.
  • Working with Xubuntu around testing XMir + Mir for their Ubuntu 13.10 release. The Xubuntu team have been awesome as usual to work with and are currently encouraging their community to test the latest ISO images available here. I would like to encourage Xubuntu folks to update the GPU wiki page I mentioned above as part of your testing.
  • We are working with flavors in general to encourage testing. We also encourage flavors to tag Mir bugs with flavormirbug so they appear in this bug search that the Mir team is using.
  • We have also been working with OEMs and ISVs around their needs with Mir and have had some useful and productive discussions. Again, these discussions have been largely private, but we hope to share more soon.

Overall, Mir is making steady and consistent progress, but we need your help to test. Keep your eyes peeled for a number of testing initiatives moving forward. Thanks!

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jono

A fantastic way of supporting the Ubuntu Edge campaign is to embed the campaign widget into your website. It looks like this:

It is as simple as pasting the following code into your site sidebar/widget/page:

<iframe src="http://www.indiegogo.com/project/461046/widget"
    width="224px" height="486px" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe>

Thanks!

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jono

One week ago today we kicked off the Ubuntu Edge Indigogo Campaign; a campaign to raise $32million using the crowd-funding site Indigogo to build the beautiful Ubuntu Edge device that can run Ubuntu Phone and Android and boot a full Ubuntu desktop running off the phone itself. Be sure to see video describing the device and the software running on it.

This campaign is ambitious, but important for a few reasons: it helps us to produce a limited run of devices perfectly crafted around the Ubuntu convergence vision, but also to utilize crowd-funding as a tool to innovate in an entrenched industry.

Currently we have raised over $7million with over 15,000 funders.

In this post I wanted to summarize the progress we have made in our first week…and what a week it was!

Our first day was a record-setter. We were the fastest project in crowd-funding history to reach $2million and the highest-raised campaign in the history of Indigogo. At around 12 hours in we had already raised 10% of our goal.

As the week progressed a flurry of media attention wrapped around the Ubuntu Edge campaign. We have had coverage on a range of media outlets, including:

We also saw OMG! Ubuntu!, one of the most popular Ubuntu sites online, integrate the Ubuntu Edge campaign into their site, providing an up to date ticker of the amount raised and other features.

We saw extensive coverage of the Ubuntu Edge campaign in video form too. I want to highlight two interesting highlights here. Firstly, Jane Silber, Canonical CEO talked about the campaign on CNBC:

Can’t see it? See it here!

I also strongly recommend you see Marques Brownlee’s video overview of Ubuntu Edge, which provides a fantastic overview of the campaign:

Can’t see it? See it here!

As the week progressed we also saw Mark Shuttleworth, Ubuntu Founder, doing a Reddit AMA that covered a lot of ground (including talking about six years of support for Ubuntu Edge) and answered many questions from those following the campaign.

Victor Palau also demonstrated Ubuntu desktop running on a lower-powered Nexus 4 to demonstrate the convergence technology, and a community member even put together a realistic interactive 3D model of the Ubuntu Edge.

Finally, we announced an awesome referral campaign. Whether you’ve contributed $20 or $2,000, you all have the chance to win something extra special: a personalised Ubuntu Edge phone engraved with your name. You can find the details of the campaign here.

Of course, for this prize to exist the campaign has to hit its target, so be sure to spread the word using every possible medium you have access to. Our goal is to make history, and every one of you can help us write that history and get a historical special-edition customized Ubuntu Edge in the process.

Week Two

Arguably our next milestone in the Ubuntu Edge campaign is to beat the crowd-funding record for the highest amount of money that has ever been raised. This currently stands at a shade over $10million and given that we are already over $7million, we are making good progress towards this goal.

One piece of feedback we have received from many of you is a desire for a lower dollar-amount perk for those who can’t afford to purchase an Ubuntu Edge device but still want to support the campaign. We are currently working on this right now, and look forward to announcing this soon.

So, let’s make the magic happen.

Visit the Ubuntu Edge campaign page

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jono

If you are going to be in Portland, Oregon in the next few weeks, I wanted to share some of the things I will be doing. If you want a meeting while I am at the Community Leadership Summit and OSCON, please get in touch and we can coordinate.

Community Leadership Summit 2013

I founded the Community Leadership Summit five years ago and the event has grown to become the primary annual meeting place for community managers, leaders, and those interested in the art and science of community management. I am really proud of how CLS has grown and matured over the years, and many thanks to our wonderful attendees who make it so fantastic.

This year’s event is shaping up to be awesome. We have a fantastic set of registered attendees, a full unconference format, enhanced audio and video facilities, and more.

Many thanks to our wonderful sponsors who have helped to support the event:

  • O’Reilly
  • Liferay
  • Microsoft
  • LinuxFund.org
  • Adobe
  • Mozilla
  • OpenNMS
  • Google

The event is completely free to attend. read more about how it works and how to get there and see the schedule.

OSCON

Lots going on at OSCON this year.

To begin with I will be running my first community management training workshop at OSCON on Mon 22nd July. This is a full-day workshop, so be sure to come and join me. Details are here.

Then on Tues 23rd July at 9.00am Jorge and Mark M will be running Service Orchestration In The Cloud With Juju – a full workshop that covers using Juju to deliver production services and how Juju charms work.

Next on Wed 24th July at 9.55am Mark Shuttleworth will be giving his keynote.

Wed 24th July is going to be a busy day for me with the following in my schedule:

See the full OSCON schedule.

We will also have a full Ubuntu booth staffed by many members of Ubuntu Oregon talking about Ubuntu for phones, desktops, and tablets, and Ubuntu for the cloud and our Juju orchestration platform.

I hope to see you there!

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