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Posts tagged with 'python'

James Henstridge

One of the projects I’ve been working on has been to improve aspects of the Ubuntu One Developer Documentation web site.  While there are still some layout problems we are working on, it is now in a state where it is a lot easier for us to update.

I have been working on updating our authentication/authorisation documentation and revising some of the file storage documentation (the API used by the mobile Ubuntu One clients).  To help verify that the documentation was useful, I wrote a small program to exercise those APIs.  The result is u1ftp: a program that exposes a user’s files via an FTP daemon running on localhost.  In conjunction with the OS file manager or a dedicated FTP client, this can be used to conveniently access your files on a system without the full Ubuntu One client installed.

You can download the program from:

https://launchpad.net/u1ftp/trunk/0.1/+download/u1ftp-0.1.zip

To make it easy to run on as many systems as possible, I packaged it up as a runnable zip file so can be run directly by the Python interpreter.  As well as a Python interpreter, you will need the following installed to run it:

  • On Linux systems, either the gnomekeyring extension (if you are using a GNOME derived desktop), or PyKDE4 (if you have a KDE derived desktop).
  • On Windows, you will need pywin32.
  • On MacOS X, you shouldn’t need any additional modules.

These could not be included in the zip file because they are extension modules rather than pure Python.

Once you’ve downloaded the program, you can run it with the following command:

python u1ftp-0.1.zip

This will start the FTP server listening at ftp://localhost:2121/.  Pointing a file manager at that URL should prompt you to log in, where you can use your standard Ubuntu One credentials and start browsing your files.  It will verify the credentials against the Ubuntu SSO service and issue an OAuth token that it stores in the keyring.  The OAuth token is then used to authenticate requests to the file storage REST API.

While I expect this program to be useful on its own, it was also intended to act as an example of how the Ubuntu One API can be used.  One way to browse the source is to simply unzip the package and poke around.  Alternatively, you can check out the source directly from Launchpad:

bzr branch lp:u1ftp

If you come up with an interesting extension to u1ftp, feel free to upload your changes as a branch on Launchpad.

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James Henstridge

Last week, we released the source code to django-openid-auth.  This is a small library that can add OpenID based authentication to Django applications.  It has been used for a number of internal Canonical projects, including the sprint scheduler Scott wrote for the last Ubuntu Developer Summit, so it is possible you’ve already used the code.

Rather than trying to cover all possible use cases of OpenID, it focuses on providing OpenID Relying Party support to applications using Django’s django.contrib.auth authentication system.  As such, it is usually enough to edit just two files in an existing application to enable OpenID login.

The library has a number of useful features:

  • As well as the standard method of prompting the user for an identity URL, you can configure a fixed OpenID server URL.  This is useful for deployments where OpenID is being used for single sign on, and you always want users to log in using a particular OpenID provider.  Rather than asking the user for their identity URL, they are sent directly to the provider.
  • It can be configured to automatically create accounts when new identity URLs are seen.
  • User names, full names and email addresses can be set on accounts based on data sent via the OpenID Simple Registration extension.
  • Support for Launchpad‘s Teams OpenID extension, which lets you query membership of Launchpad teams when authenticating against Launchpad’s OpenID provider.  Team memberships are mapped to Django group membership.

While the code can be used for generic OpenID login, we’ve mostly been using it for single sign on.  The hope is that it will help members of the Ubuntu and Launchpad communities reuse our authentication system in a secure fashion.

The source code can be downloaded using the following Bazaar command:

bzr branch lp:django-openid-auth

Documentation on how to integrate the library is available in the README.txt file.  The library includes some code written by Simon Willison for django-openid, and uses the same licensing terms (2 clause BSD) as that project.

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