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What Chris Johnston talks about

Posts tagged with 'ubuntu tutorials'

Chris Johnston

I have been a Google Chrome user for a while now, and I have two different ‘Users’ in Chrome. The default user is my personal account, and then I have a work account. For my personal email I use a Google Apps Gmail account and just check my email with Chrome. I use Thunderbird to check my work email. For a while now I have had an issue where I click a link from Thunderbird and it tries to open in my default Chrome user. This doesn’t work very well as I am not logged into most of my work accounts on my personal user. This drove me nuts! Now I have to copy and paste the URL into the work user Chrome window. After a little Googling tonight, I was able to setup Thunderbird to open URLs in my work user Chrome browser. Life is much better now! To do this, I had to add two lines to prefs.js. On Ubuntu 13.04, prefs.js is located at ~/.thunderbird/ /prefs.js where is what appears to be a random set of numbers/letters followed by .default.

The two lines I added are:

user_pref(“network.protocol-handler.app.http”, “/opt/google/chrome/google-chrome –profile-directory=’Profile 1′”);
user_pref(“network.protocol-handler.app.https”, “/opt/google/chrome/google-chrome –profile-directory=’Profile 1′”);

If the profile-directory for the Chrome user you are wanting the links to open in is different than what I have, you may need to edit the directory name. This worked for me on Raring (what will become Ubuntu 13.04) with Thunderbird 17.0.4.

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Chris Johnston

My buddy Dustin Kirkland pointed me to a neat little utility that he wrote with Scott Moser called ssh-import-id. Since he showed it to me a few months ago, I have used it many times and it has made my life quite a bit easier.

ssh-import-id fetches a the defined user(s) public keys from Launchpad, validates them, and then adds them to the ~/.ssh/authorized_keys file. That’s it, but if you need to add multiple people, or don’t know which key they are going to want used, this will save you time.

Dustin has tried to get it added to OpenSSH, but he hasn’t been able to succeed at this yet.

To use ssh-import-id, you first need to install it if it already isn’t:

sudo apt-get install ssh-import-id

Then to run it you would run:

ssh-import-id chrisjohnston

This would import my public keys. You are also able to import multiple users at the same time:

ssh-import-id chrisjohnston kirkland

If you are looking for the latest version of the code it is available in a ppa:

ppa:ssh-import-id/ppa

If you have problems or want to check out the code, check out the package on Launchpad.

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