Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'google'

David Murphy (schwuk)

Zach Holman writes about how GitHub communicates:

here’s a look at most of the communication that happened at GitHub on one random recent day: February 4, 2014

The expected methods are all there: chat (Campfire in their case), email, and – of course – GitHub itself.

One thing that piqued my interest was their internal-only social network “Team” which seems very reminiscent of how Automattic use WordPress & P2. Since I learned how Automattic use P2, I’ve been wondering if we could do something similar at Canonical. Perhaps we could use Google+  for this as we already use it for internal HangoutsUbuntu Developer Summit, and to power Ubuntu On-Air. There are ways to limit Google+ communities to members of your Google Apps domain.

(Side note: I hate having two Google+ accounts!)

I really need to finish coalescing my thoughts and put them into their own post…

The other point I noted was that their use of email was both minimal and individual – Team and GitHub itself are their primary ways of disseminating information.

It always interesting to see how others do achieve similar goals to yourself.

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David Murphy (schwuk)

Zach Holman writes about how GitHub communicates:

here’s a look at most of the communication that happened at GitHub on one random recent day: February 4, 2014

The expected methods are all there: chat (Campfire in their case), email, and – of course – GitHub itself.

One thing that piqued my interest was their internal-only social network “Team” which seems very reminiscent of how Automattic use WordPress & P2. Since I learned how Automattic use P2, I’ve been wondering if we could do something similar at Canonical. Perhaps we could use Google+  for this as we already use it for internal Hangouts, Ubuntu Developer Summit, and to power Ubuntu On-Air. There are ways to limit Google+ communities to members of your Google Apps domain.

(Side note: I hate having two Google+ accounts!)

I really need to finish coalescing my thoughts and put them into their own post…

The other point I noted was that their use of email was both minimal and individual – Team and GitHub itself are their primary ways of disseminating information.

It always interesting to see how others do achieve similar goals to yourself.

The post How GitHub communicates appeared first on David Murphy.

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David Murphy (schwuk)

As part of our self-improvement and knowledge sharing within Canonical, within our group (Professional and Engineering Services) we regularly – at least once a month – run what we call an “InfoSession”. Basically it is Google Hangout on Air with a single presenter on a topic that is of interest/relevance to others, and one of my responsibilities is organising them. Previously we have had sessions on:

  • Go (a couple of sessions in fact)
  • SystemTap
  • Localization (l10n) and internationalization (i18n)
  • Juju
  • Graphviz
  • …and many others…

Today the session was on continuous integration with Tarmac and Vagrant, presented by Daniel Manrique from our certification team. In his own words:

Merge requests and code reviews are a fact of life in Canonical. Most projects start by manually merging approved requests, including running a test suite prior to merging.

This infosession will talk about tools that automate this workflow (Tarmac), while leveraging your project’s test suite to ensure quality, and virtual machines (using Vagrant) to provide multi-release, repeatable testing.

Like most of our sessions it is publicly available, here it is is for your viewing pleasure:

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