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Posts tagged with 'qt'

Timo Jyrinki

Qt 5.2.1 in Ubuntu

Ubuntu running Qt 5.2.1
Ubuntu running Qt 5.2.1
Qt 5.2.1 landed in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS last Friday, hooray! Making it into a drop-in replacement for Qt 5.0.2 was not trivial. Because of the qreal change, it was decided to rebuild everything against the new Qt, so it was an all at once approach involving roughly 130 source packages while the parts were moving constantly. The landing last week meant pushing to archives around three thousand binary packages - counting all six architectures - with the total size of closer to 10 gigabytes.

The new Qt brings performance and features to base future work on, and is a solid base for the future of Ubuntu. You may be interested in the release notes for Qt 5.2.0 and 5.2.1. The Ubuntu SDK got updated to Qt Creator 3.0.1 + new Ubuntu plugin at the same time, although updates for the older Ubuntu releases is a work in progress by the SDK Team.

How We Got Here

Throughout the last few months before the last joint push, I filed tens of tagged bugs. For most of that time I was interested only in build and unit test results, since even tracking those was quite a task. I offered simple fixes here and there myself, if I found out a fix.

I created automated Launchpad recipe builds for over 80 packages that rely on Qt 5 in Ubuntu. Meanwhile I also kept on updating the Qt packaging for its 20+ source packages and tried to stay on top of Debian's and upstream's changes.

Parallel to this work, some like the Unity 8 and UI Toolkit developers started experimenting with my Qt 5.2 PPA. It turned out the rewritten QML engine in Qt 5.2 - V4 - was not entirely stable when 5.2.0 was released, so they worked together with upstream on fixes. It was only after 5.2.1 release that it could be said that V4 worked well enough for Unity 8. Known issues like these slowed down the start of full-blown testing.

Then everything built, unit tests passed, most integration tests passed and things seemed mostly to work. We had automated autopilot integration testing runs. The apps team tested through all of the app store to find out whether some needed fixes - most were fine without changes. On top of the found autopilot test failures and other app issues, manual testing found a few more bugs

Sudoku
Some critical pieces of software
like Sudoku needed small fixing
Finally last Thursday it was decided to push Qt in, with a belief that the remaining issues had fixes in branches or not blockers. It turned out the real deployment of Qt revealed a couple of more problems, and some new issues were raised to be blockers, and not all of the believed fixes were really fixing the bugs. So it was not a complete success. Considering the complexity of the landing, it was an adequate accomplishment however.

Specific Issues

Throughout this exercise I bumped into more obstacles that I can remember, but those included:
  • Not all of the packages had seen updates for months or for example since last summer, and since I needed to rebuild everything I found out various problems that were not related to Qt 5.2
  • Unrelated changes during 14.04 development broke packages - like one wouldn't immediately think a gtkdoc update would break a package using Qt
  • Syncing packaging with Debian is GOOD, and the fixes from Debian were likewise excellent and needed, but some changes there had effects on our wide-spread Qt 5 usage, like the mkspecs directory move
  • xvfb used to run unit tests needed parameters updated in most packages because of OpenGL changes in Qt
  • arm64 and ppc64el were late to be added to the landing PPA. Fixing those archs up was quite a last minute effort and needed to continue after landing by the porters. On the plus side, with Qt 5.2's V4 working on those archs unlike Qt 5.0's V8 based Qt Declarative, a majority of Unity 8 dependencies are now already available for 64-bit ARM and PowerPC!
  • While Qt was being prepared the 100 other packages kept on changing, and I needed to keep on top of all of it, especially during the final landing phase that lasted for two weeks. During it, there was no total control of "locking" packages into Qt 5.2 transition, so for the 20+ manual uploads I simply needed to keep track of whether something changed in the distribution and accommodate.
One issue related to the last one was that some things needed were in progress at the time. There was no support for automated AP test running using a PPA. There was also no support on building images. If migration to Ubuntu Touch landing process (CI Train, a middle point on the way to CI Airlines) had been completed for all the packages earlier, handling the locking would have been clearer, and the "trunk passes all integration tests too" would have prevented "trunk seemingly got broken" situations I ended up since I was using bzr trunks everywhere.

Qt 5.3?

We are near to having a promoted Ubuntu image for the mobile users using Qt 5.2, if no new issues pop up. Ubuntu 14.04 LTS will be released in a month to the joy of desktop and mobile users alike.

It was discussed during the vUDS that Qt 5.3.x would be likely Qt version for the next cycle, to be on the more conservative side this time. It's not entirely wrong to say we should have migrated to Qt 5.1 in the beginning of this cycle and only consider 5.2. With 5.0 in use with known issues, we almost had to switch to 5.2.

Kubuntu will join the Qt 5 users next cycle, so it's no longer only Ubuntu deciding the version of Qt. Hopefully there can be a joint agreement, but in the worst case Ubuntu will need a separate Qt version packaged.

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Timo Jyrinki

Packages

I quite like the current status of Qt 5 in Debian and Ubuntu (the links are to the qtbase packages, there are ca. 15 other modules as well). Despite Qt 5 being bleeding edge and Ubuntu having had the need to use it before even the first stable release came out in December, the co-operation with Debian has gone well. Debian is now having the first Qt 5 uploads done to experimental and later on to unstable. My work contributed to pkg-kde git on the modules has been welcomed, and even though more work has been done there by others, there haven't been drastic changes that would cause too big transition problems on the Ubuntu side. It has of course helped to ask others what they want, like the whole usage of qtchooser. Now with Qt 5.0.2 I've been able to mostly re-sync all newer changes / fixes to my packaging from Debian to Ubuntu and vice versa.

There will remain some delta, as pkg-kde plans to ask for a complete transition to qtchooser so that all Qt using packages would declare the Qt version either by QT_SELECT environment variable (preferable) or a package dependency (qt5-default or qt4-default). As a temporary change related to that, Debian will have a debhelper modification that defaults QT_SELECT to qt4 for the duration of the transition. Meanwhile, Ubuntu already shipped the 13.04 release with Qt 5, and a shortcut was taken there instead to prevent any Qt 4 package breakage. However, after the transition period in Debian is over, that small delta can again be removed.

I will also need to continue pushing any useful packaging I do to Debian. I pushed qtimageformats and qtdoc last week, but I know I'm still behind with some "possibly interesting" git snapshot modules like qtsensors and qtpim.

Patches

More delta exists in the form of multiple patches related to the recent Ubuntu Touch efforts. I do not think they are of immediate interest to Debian – let's start packaging Qt 5 apps to Debian first. However, about all of those patches have already been upstreamed to be part of Qt 5.1 or Qt 5.2, or will be later on. Some already were for 5.0.2.

A couple of months ago Ubuntu did have some patches hanging around with no clear author information. This was a result of the heated preparation for the Ubuntu Touch launches, and the fact that patches flew (too) quickly in place into various PPA:s. I started hunting down the authors, and the situation turned out to be better than I thought. About half of the patches were already upstreamed, and work on properly upstreaming the other ones was swiftly started after my initial contact. Proper DEP3 fields do help understanding the overall situation. There are now 10 Canonical individuals in the upstream group of contributors, and in the last week's sprint it turned out more people will be joining them to upstream their future patches.

Nowadays about all the requests I get for including patches from developers are stuff that was already upstreamed, like the XEmbed support in qtbase. This is how it should be.

One big patch still being Ubuntu only is the Unity appmenu support. There was a temporary solution for 13.04 that forward-ported the Qt 4 way of doing it. This will be however removed from the first 13.10 ('saucy') upload, as it's not upstreamable (the old way of supporting Unity appmenus was deliberately dropped from Qt 5). A re-implementation via QPA plugin support is on its way, but it may be that the development version users will be without appmenu support for some duration. Another big patch is related to qtwebkit's device pixel ratio, which will need to be fixed. Apart from these two areas of work that need to be followed through, patches situation is quite nice as mentioned.

Conclusion

Free software will do world domination, and I'm happy to be part of it.

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Timo Jyrinki

I'd like to modify my discussion comment and earlier thoughts into a short blog post touching only some of the technical concerns voiced, and my opinion to those.

Claim (my version): Ubuntu/Canonical is going the "Google route" to become another Android, while Android has not benefited the Linux ecosystem in any way, forking everything

Firstly, Ubuntu is open to development and community for also mobile and tablet - Android has none of that, just code drops that get modded. (yes, some people have a problem with CLA like Canonical's or Qt's, I have no problem with those - let's keep that discussion elsewhere). Ubuntu contributes back to Debian and upstream projects like Qt - those upstream projects it's not upstream of itself. There are not too many free software mobile UIs for example. SHR has some E17 apps, Nemo Mobile a handful of Qt apps and so on.

Secondly, I disagree about Android - even in its current shape and after creating everything from scratch with mobile on mind, Android has done tremendous things for the free software community, kernel development, mobile device driver and making things like Replicant possible. If those aren't directly seen on the desktop side, that's because it's not the desktop and most free software desktop users don't use free software mobile products (usually at most a vendor provided Android).

I feel people get too attached to software projects or even the desktop in general. The money to pay desktop has traditionally largely come from the server. As a discussion-heating example Wayland has been a great promise for 5 years and continues to be, yet no products use it (software products like distributions or hardware+software products). That's not a problem per se for a great and ambitious project, but it means no interested party has taken it to create products. I was very excited about Gallium3D and Wayland in 2008, but somewhat optimistic in believing they would conquer the world in one or two years. In perspective, I've always seen the "version staring" a common habit in enthusiasts me included. I think it extents to "shiny development projects that should be taken into production use immediately".

The Nokia N9 triumphs all other 2011 mobile phones in general and even the current user interfaces like iOS, Android and Windows Phone in general usability ideas (if only it'd run Cortex-A15 instead of OMAP3..). It uses X.org and Qt 4.7. Jolla's plans for their first phone at the end of this year? Qt 4.8, no Wayland. Like N9 which otherwise had unfortunate fate, I hope Jolla will sell millions of free software wielding products to the masses. The biggest problem with X.org is, though, the drivers, generally zero support from vendors so hard to make products. Hooking into Android EGL drivers and building on top of that seems a good compromise at the moment. Note that from product creation point of view it's not the non-shininess of X.org that IMHO is the blocker. Wayland and Mir may help on the driver side.

I want products!

I'd love to see more push to have actual products on the market, since otherwise we don't get free software to the masses. If Mir helps Ubuntu to do that in one year, fine (I don't know how it's going to be). Yes Mir is a new shiny project, but it's a very product/target oriented project one. If Android would be open as a project, it wouldn't hurt - other than feelings attached to the other projects especially by the core developers and fans of those - if it was the superior alternative from product creation perspective making all of X.org, upstart, systemd, Wayland, Pulseaudio, D-Bus, glibc less interesting to product creators while even more interest would go to Android. It's not so now, Android is not an open project in any sense, even though still beneficial for free software. Ubuntu will keep using a lot more of the traditional stack anyway than Android (which also just got rid of BlueZ), but I have zero problem of changing any of the components if it's visioned to be required to get finished, ready to use products out. IMHO the key is to get products out, and I hope all the parties manage to do that.

Of the traditional GNU/Linux desktop distributions only Ubuntu seems to be adapting for the mobile in large steps at the moment. The other distributions in the mobile playing field are: (Android/)Replicant, Mer/Sailfish, Firefox OS, Tizen, added with OpenEmbedded based distributions like SHR. Have you used those on a daily basis on your devices? I believe you should. I think KDE will bring with its Plasma Active - currently focusing on building on top of Mer - mobile power to the traditional GNU/Linux distributions, but otherwise it's all up to the new players - and Ubuntu.

Like many know, I used Debian exclusively on my primary phone for ca. two years before switching mostly to N9. During all that time, I already pondered why people and distributions are so focused on x86 and desktop. And the reason is that that's what their history is, and I stared at the wrong place - desktop distributions. I dismissed Android and some of the small newcomers in the mobile distro playing field, but it seems that big changes are needed to not need completely new players. I think Ubuntu is on the completely right track to both benefit from the history and adapt for the future. I still hope more developers to Debian Mobile, though!! Debian should be the universal operating system after all.

Disclaimer: I'm an Ubuntu community person from 2004, Debian Developer since 2008 and a contractor for Canonical for ca. 1 year. My opinions haven't changed during the 1 year, but I've learned a lot more of how free software is loved at Canonical despite critics.

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Timo Jyrinki

OpenPhoenux GTA04

Postman was on a kind mood yesterday. My OpenPhoenux GTA04 arrived! I had my newer Neo FreeRunner upgraded via the service from Golden Delicious.

First, something rare to behold in phones nowadays - Made in Bavaria:






As a sidenote, also rare now - my Nokia N9 is one of the last phones that had this:

It's sad that's now a thing of the past for both hardware assembly and software! But that's just a hint for new companies to step in.

But back to GTA04 - a quick boot to the pre-installed Debian w/ LXDE:






And then as a shortcut unpacked and booted into QtMoko (well, it's also Debian) instead to test that phone functionality also works - and it does:



Next up: brewing something of my own!

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Timo Jyrinki

Almost forgot to post this. My mobile phones running free software in photos. From left to right:



All of that software running on the devices is more or less free software, with Harmattan obviously being by far the least free, especially applications, but still better than any other on-the-shelf phone software *), and the others being 99% or "Ubuntu like" free ie. possibly with firmware and a few driver exceptions. N9 needs some bootloader work still before Nemo, Debian, Ubuntu etc. can be run there. I've collected a few things about N9 from this point of view at a wiki page.
*) Not sure about every Android phone, but Android is not openly developed anyway so it's hardly a similar free software project such as freedesktop.org projects or Qt

I gave my N900 away now since obviously I cannot make full use of each one of these. I'm multi-SIMming my N9 and the GTA02a7 Neo FreeRunner for daily use, while the other FreeRunner and N950 are purely for tinkering related purposes. The development FreeRunner will get on upgrade to GTA04 once it's available, and then hopefully that can be made into a daily usable phone as well.

By the way, see you in FSCONS in Gothenburg next weekend. Even rms will be there, which is always interesting of course :)

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Timo Jyrinki

The MeeGo community is frustrated with the news of the MeeGo brand being abandoned. Some are understandably angry or otherwise not happy about how Linux Foundation, Intel handled the Tizen announcement and community in general - or more like how they didn't handle it at all. Last week Openmind 2011 happened to be arranged in Tampere on the very same day as Tizen announcement came alive. It was good in the way that it lead to the fact that Nomovok's CEO Pasi Nieminen was able to initiate the "Reigniting MeeGo" session not just by talking vague things about future, but actually about the process which led to Tizen and the unfortunately brief initial PR about it. Pasi is intense on emphasizing the quality and role of Qt in Tizen as well, even though officially Tizen is all about HTML5 and apparently from Samsung's part at least EFL is provided as a native toolkit. However, the promise of Tizen compared to MeeGo is reportedly that the toolkit is not specified in compliancy documents, so HTML5 with WAC is the main/only "3rd party apps" layer whereas others can be offered case-by-case. This means that unlike before, the underlying system can be built on top of practically any distribution (theoretically) and using whatever toolkits and other techniques wanted. Obviously the "Nordic System Integrators" are probably all very keen of using Qt to produce more of Nokia N9 quality user experiences in various products.

Taking the corporate hat off, I as a community member am also puzzled. The only reason I was not completely blown by the news was that I didn't yet manage to get involved in MeeGo community on a daily basis, since I'm involved with a dozen communities already. Instead I've been more like scratching the surface with MeeGo Network Finland meetings, IRC activity, OBS usage for building a few apps for MeeGo Harmattan and MeeGo proper etc. But I can somewhat understand how people like Jarkko Moilanen from meego-fi feel. They have given a _lot_ to the MeeGo community and brand, all taken away without hearing or pre-notice.

So where to now for MeeGo community? Tizen is one obvious choice. However, for all the talks that even I started this post with, Tizen is still vaporware today, and the dislike of how community is being treated might make it easy to consider other options. Also, if Tizen's reference implementation has lesser meaning, it might also mean less to actually be "in" the Tizen community than in MeeGo. I met Jos Poortvliet at Openmind, and he invited people to openSUSE. There is a lot of common ground with MeeGo and openSUSE - strong OBS usage, RPM packaging, community side focused on KDE and therefore Qt.

I would like to now point similarly to Debian! If one is tired about corporate interests and not listening to community, there is no match for Debian's 15+ years history, purely volunteer based, trust based organization, and first of all scope. While openSUSE has traditionally focused on desktop (even though like Jos pointed out they are open to all new contributions and projects), Debian has always had the "universal" scope, ie. no boundaries besides producing free software operating system for various purposes. There are over 10 architectures maintained at the moment, including the ARM (different ports for ARMv4 and hard-float ARMv7) and x86 from MeeGo world. There are even alternative kernels to Linux, mainly the GNU/kFreeBSD port. There are multiple relevant plans and projects like the Smartphones wiki area, most noticeably Debian on Neo FreeRunner. I have run Debian on my primary mobile phone for over 2.5 years, although now in the recent months I've had dual-SIM in my Nokia N950 as well (Debian not yet running on Nokia N950 or Nokia N9 - but it can and will be done!).

What Debian may lack in both good and bad is corporate funding, if you don't count the still quite respectful contributions from Ubuntu to Debian (it's in Ubuntu's interests to contribute as much possible back to Debian, so that the delta remains small). For each and every aspect, it needs a volunteer - there are a thousand volunteer Debian Developers, and at least a double of that of people without the official DD status but who still maintain a package or two among the 25000+ packages in Debian. That means also that one my find it more lucrative to join a project that has paid people to do some of the "boring parts", more of fancy web tools, including for bug handling and build systems like the OBS (which I do love by the way). On the other hand, there is no other project in my opinion where what you do really matters as much.

To find out more about Debian from MeeGo perspective, please see the recent mailing list post Mobile UXes - From the DebConf11 BoF to the stars where I wrote most of the MeeGo (CE) part when I was asked to and known of my MeeGo involvement.

Last but not certainly least, there is the Mer project - originally "maemo reconstructed", ie. making Nokia's "not really distro" into a real distro by filling in the void places. Now it's obviously MeeGo reconstructed, and they aim to be the MeeGo they always wanted MeeGo to be! Read the post for details from Carsten Munk and other key Mer people. They share the love for Qt, and want the core to be as lean as possible. They also aim to incorporate the most community like aspect from MeeGo - MeeGo CE - as the reference vendor in Mer. They also aim to be Tizen compliant - and when Tizen comes alive, I wouldn't see why the Tizen reference implementation couldn't be used for saving resources. Maybe Nomovok and/or others could offer the Qt maintaining part.

So, it might be that Tizen itself is enough for most people's needs. The key point however in this post is not to fall in agony if one corporate based project takes big turns - it has happened before, it will happen in the future. There are always enough political and business reasons from some points of view to do Big Changes. But the wider community is out there, always, and it's bigger than you think. You should consider where you want to contribute by asking yourself why you are/were part of for example the MeeGo community. Aaron Seigo from KDE asked us all this question in the Openmind MeeGo Reignited session, and I think it's good to repeat.

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