Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'opportunity'

Nicholas Skaggs

PSA: Ubuntu Quality wants you!


NOTICE: To whom it may concern, the ubuntu quality team is seeking those with a desire to help ubuntu to contribute to the quality and testing efforts. With a little time and a willingness to learn, you too can unlock the tester within you!

Interested? Please inquire below!

If that text didn't get you, I hope the picture did. Seriously though, if you are here reading this page, I want to offer you an opportunity to help out. We as a team have expanded our activities and projects this cycle and we want to extend an offer for you to come along and learn with us. We're exploring automated testing with autopilot and autopkg, manual testing of images, and the virtues of testing in a regular cadence.

But we can't do it alone, nor do we wish to! We'd love to hear from you. Please have a look at our getting involved page (but do excuse the theme dust!) and get in touch. I offered a challenge to this community in the past, and I was blown away by the emails that flooded my inbox. Send me an email, tell me your interests, and ask me how you can help. Let me help get you started. Flood my inbox again1. Let's make ubuntu better, together!

1. If anyone is counting, I believe the record is ~100 emails in one 24 hour period :-p

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Nicholas Skaggs

Jamming Thursday's!

Right now as I type we have two jams going on! Last week Jono posted about enhancing the ubuntu.com/community page. If your a part of the community, join in raising the banner for your specific focus area. The fun is happening now on #ubuntu-docs. For the full details, see Jono's post. For us quality folks, the pad is here: http://pad.ubuntu.com/communitywebsite-contribute-quality. Feel free to type and edit away!

In addition, as Daniel Holbach mentioned, there is a hackathon for automated testing. Come hang out with us on #ubuntu-quality, learn, ask and write some tests. Again, the full details can be found on Daniel's post.

Come join us!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Notice I'm not mentioning a good video walk-through, but it is in HD! It can be viewed on youtube here. I had a lot of trouble doing my first screencast, but I think I have a promising setup now for the future. I promise HD, lag-free, and better editing in the future. For reference, I highly recommend flowblade to edit and kazam to record. Kudos to both developers for nice pieces of software!

The text version is available here and I encourage you to follow along with the video. You don't need anything more than a reasonably modern pc that can run a VM and you can help iso test. Take 20 minutes to watch and follow along and take the fear out of iso testing. Then join us next week as we continue our testing cadence and verify our daily isos are in good shape.

And don't worry, no one will know it's running the installation on a separate workspace while you watch youtube videos.. It'll be our secret.

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Nicholas Skaggs

As announced earlier the kernel team is looking for a some folks to help bring the 12.10 kernel to 12.04. Once 12.10 has been released, the team wants to enable newer hardware support via the kernel for the LTS version of the desktop. So, since the original announcement, we've had 10 people help test the various builds of the kernel from the ppa. Thanks so much to all who tested! Now we'd like to take this testing to the next level.

We've put together a list of commonly used hardware that we want to ensure proper support for the kernel. I'm asking for volunteers to run the kernel from the ppa on precise and report results. The catch here is that we want to have at least 1 person who has each piece of hardware listed be represented. Make sense? For example, we want folks running nvidia cards to have at least a couple people reporting results using nouveau and the proprietary driver. Same for AMD and Intel. On the wireless side, getting someone who has a chipset of each of the manufacturers listed is our goal. This is a first step in our on-going efforts to help make testing and quality a more assured and quantitative effort. We're going 'quantal' if you will. For those who want to have even more detailed and specific hardware testing, hang tight. If you'll remember this past UDS we spoke about creating a community hardware database. Work to enable this is on-going, and I hope to be able to share more about it in the coming months. In the meantime, let's build up a list of folks and systems ready to populate such a database, shall we? ;-)

So if your interested in helping, go ahead and edit that wiki page. Add yourself under one or more pieces of hardware. There's a handy script that should help you identify what's in your system if your not quite sure. Then head over to the QATracker. 


Once there click on 'Quantal kernel for precise LTS', you will wind up on a page showcasing the tests and instructions for this call for testing. If you click the on 'Link to the installation information' you will get information on installing and uninstalling the package. Similarly the 'Link to bug reporting instructions' provides details on reporting a bug you find in the test case. Finally, if you click 'Kernel Smoke Tests' you'll arrive on the page to report your testcase results. Note you will need to sign in using your ubuntu sso account to report results.

If you encounter issues, you can always reboot into your current working kernel and be back to normal. As always, if you have any issues in using the tracker, feel free to get in touch with me.

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Nicholas Skaggs

ISO Adoptions

Ubuntu Desktop i386

Yesterday, ~70 people (and counting! you guys are rockstars, thank you so much!) answered the call to adopt, and are now sponsoring over 2 dozen isos for ubuntu, and it's flavors like xubuntu, kubuntu, edubuntu, lubuntu and ubuntu studio. That is wonderful news.


However, there are a couple sad iso's still out there who are wanting to be adopted. They are the more troublesome ones to adopt if you will. Everyone loves and wants to help Ubuntu Desktop iso, but little pay attention to our mac and wubi specific testing. If you have access         to a windows machine and can help test wubi, please let me know! If you have access to a macbook or other mac hardware please also let me know! I can help you adopt those troublesome iso's and make ubuntu precise a better experience for those with similar hardware.

Ubuntu Desktop amd64+mac
Look at his face and then hit your compose button to email me. You'll be glad you did. Contact me at nicholas.skaggs at the canonical.com domain and I will make sure to get you connected to one of these little guys!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Would you adopt an ISO?

Would you adopt an ISO? A poor ISO, who cannot otherwise fend for itself in the cruel world of digital information. He's here one day and gone the next. Replaced by newer and better. Would you be willing to love, test, and use him while he is in existence? May his death not be in vain, but rather for the greater good of advancing us closer to that golden iso release to which we will all turn. It's powers we hope will transform our computers into the goodness that is ubuntu precise!

I trust my story has stirred your heart to action! In all seriousness, the ubuntu community is looking for a few brave volunteers to help shepherd our iso's thru the remaining week before release. If you volunteer, we are asking you to run through all of the testcases each day until next week when we release, for a particular iso and report your results to the isotracker. You can see what's required by having a look at this page. That lists the builds for the isos that were created today, each having some tests that help ensure the isos don't contain bugs. It's worth budgeting an hour or two to complete these tests, not including the time you need to download the iso. On Thursday of this week (April 19th 2012), we are scheduled to start the RC image testing which will be a dedicated milestone iso testing, utilizing the same tests.

As an added bonus to sponsoring, I am committing to personally emailing you and following up with help, tips and status updates on iso testing as we go throughout the week. Hurry, this offer won't last forever! To get started, email me personally with your the following info:

  • Your testing hardware (real or virtual machine; amd64 or i386)
  • Your name and email address
  • Optionally, a specific iso(s) you wish to sponsor

I can be reached at nicholas.skaggs at the canonical.com domain. You may also leave a comment on this post, or send a message to the ubuntu-qa mailing list and I will followup with you. After you contact me, I will help you through the adoption process and get you and your new iso off to a wonderful start. Thanks so much for considering making a commitment to ubuntu!

 (If this reads like a "Help save X, donate now!" campaign, then you've read it correctly :-) )

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Nicholas Skaggs

As of last Friday, the precise beta2 release went to final and was published. As with beta1, a ppa containing manual test cases via checkbox has been made available. For those who helped test or contribute, perhaps you saw your name in lights? If not go check out those release notes! We appreciate your good work; kudos to our testing community. (BTW, if we missed you, we apologize! Shoot me an email and I will get you added to the list!)

Thanks for everyone who contributed testcases for this testing cycle. We got more comprehensive coverage than beta1. We're always happy to get more tests :-) Take a look at the wiki page for contributing tests. If you are unable to use launchpad for whatever reason, feel free to send a message to the ubuntu-qa mailing list. We can help you get your test cases added to checkbox even if your not a developer.

Now onto the testing! First you need to download the precise beta2 iso. You will find the iso's available here. Pick one that will work on your hardware.

Next, follow this wiki page to get checkbox and the application tests installed, run through the test cases and report your results. Thanks so much for helping test! If you find a bug, Jono has a great tutorial on how to file a bug. Make sure you mention your bug report in your comment if a test fails!

Thanks for testing and helping make ubuntu rock!

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Nicholas Skaggs


The precise beta1 release just dropped! As a follow-up to my earlier post about participating in testing with this release, now is your opportunity to do some manual application testing for ubuntu. This is a perfect ubuntu global jam activity!

Thanks for everyone who contributed testcases for this testing cycle. If you missed getting your merge in on time, don't worry! Beta2 is coming up and I hope we can add even more tests. Take a look at the wiki page for contributing tests. If you are unable to use launchpad for whatever reason, feel free to send a message to the ubuntu-qa mailing list. We can help you get your test cases added to checkbox for beta2!

Now onto the testing! First you need to download the precise beta1 iso. You will find the iso's available here. Pick one that will work on your hardware.

Next, follow this wiki page to get checkbox and the application tests installed, run through the test cases and report your results. Thanks so much for helping test! If you find a bug, Jono has a great tutorial on how to file a bug. Make sure you mention your bug report in your comment if a test fails!

Go forth and test!

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Nicholas Skaggs

The precise beta1 release is happening this week (I know, I know beta already!). Despite my short tenure in the ubuntu QA community, we've already seen a huge increase in the amount of manual application testing. I thank everyone who helped test when I and others have put out calls for testing this cycle. As part of our desire to continually improve our processes, I'm am adopting the checkbox tool to help do manual testing for the beta1 and beta2 releases during the precise cycle.

For anyone who participated in the Unity testing, you will remember how much nicer it was to use checkbox to deliver the tests and be able to submit feedback directly from your desktop. Running these tests was a huge part getting Unity 5.2 and Unity 5.4 out in precise. Didrocks posted about the response and subsequent lessons learned. For beta1 and beta2, I'd like to move this method of testing onto the default desktop applications.

There are two opportunities here to get involved. First of all, if your interested in helping test our default desktop applications, you will be able to do so directly with checkbox in a similar vein as unity. I will post instructions on testing this week. It will require you to install from a ppa, but I hope to remove the requirement for beta2 :-)

Secondly, if your an application developer who wants to get some testing done you can contribute tests directly to my bazaar branch on launchpad. I've written up instructions for doing so on the wiki. Currently the following testcases are being targeted. If you responsible for any of these applications and haven't spoken to me, I'd love to talk to you about increasing test coverage!

firefox
rythmnbox
empathy
thunderbird
nautilus
libreoffice
software-center
system-settings
deja-dup
totem
evince
file-roller
gedit
eog
gwibber
seahorse
ubuntuone
update-manager
shotwell

If you are a passionate user of any of these applications (or any other applications), get in touch with me as well! You can help contribute tests even if your not capable of submitting a merge request via launchpad :-) EDIT: Since so many have asked, if you can't contribute by submitting a merge request, update the ubuntu testcase wiki and then send me an email.  You can find my address here on my launchpad profile. I will incorporate your tests into the tool. Read the guidelines on the format, and then add the testcase to the applications page. It's important to get the format right so doublecheck your work! That said, please try going through the normal route of writing a checkbox test if you can -- they are really easy to do!

In closing, I would like to thank everyone who helped rewrite testcases on the ubuntu testcase wiki. These testcases were used as a leg up on getting tests for these applications, and have us off to a good start on getting more testing coverage for ubuntu's default applications. I would also like to briefly mention the future of testing for next cycle. My goal is to gather feedback from doing manual testing this cycle with checkbox and use it to blueprint the tools and parameters for how we plan on testing during the Q cycle. I hope to have some sessions around testing during UDS, and look forward to hearing from you about your experiences!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Opportunity: Writing application test cases

This post is part of the opportunity series designed to let you know about ways to get involved with QA inside ubuntu.


One of the types of testing the QA team performs is at an application level. Once we are assured we can install a system, we want to know if it can do more useful tasks than just boot! This is where application testing comes in. This wiki represents the application test cases that are utilized when testing applications.

http://testcases.qa.ubuntu.com/Applications

Currently the QA team is updating these application tests. This work is being done for several reasons. The first is to ensure all of the tests follow the same template and thus are easier to understand and maintain. The second is similar to the first; the tests need to be updated to be both correct (has something in the software changed?) and in the proper template. And finally the tests are being updated in anticipation of using a new tool to help maintain and run these test cases.

To do this work, the ubuntu qa mailing list along with a google doc have been employed. The google doc contains all of the application tests from the wiki. They are located on the 'All test cases from wiki' tab. The mailing list contains the discussions and reviews of the updated tests. Here is the basic workflow:

1) Copy the test case that needs to be re-written to the 'Test case rewrites' tab
2) Update the test case to conform to the new template and guidelines
3) Post a message to the mailing list with the test ids you have written, and ask someone to review
4) Update the test on the wiki to reflect the changes
5) Move the updated test case to the 'Completed test case rewrites' tab

This is a wonderful way to get involved. Do you have a favorite application? Consider writing and editing the test cases to make sure it works properly in ubuntu by getting some good test cases written. Do you not only understand technical jargon, but are also capable of writing? The community needs your skills! Join the mailing list, hop on #ubuntu-testing on IRC, or reply here with comment. I want to make sure you get plugged in with the rest of the wonderful folks helping make ubuntu great. Thanks!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Community QA Opportunities in Ubuntu

It's been a month since I began working with the wonderful QA community inside ubuntu. In that time I've learned there are a plethora of things going on and lots of different ways to get involved. I wanted to do a small series of posts on the available QA oppurtunites you can take part of today inside of ubuntu. There is an excellent list along with descriptions on the QA wiki site that you can read about here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Testing/Activities.

You'll notice this work is broad-reaching encompassing many different skill-sets. The community can benefit from your help no matter what skills you have! This is one of the reasons why quality is such a neat way to get involved inside ubuntu. You'll have a chance to work with people doing the latest in cutting edge development, as well as those who are keeping the LTS releases rock solid and updated for 5 years after there release.

Ready to get involved? Be sure and watch this blog for more detailed opportunities. In the meantime, here's some suggestions;

Are you a someone who loves making sure everything is always running smooth? The ubuntu+1 maintenance team would love your help!

Are your a rock-solid developer, or perhaps someone new to coding but looking to expand your skills? There are different tools being built inside the ubuntu community for helping doing quality work. There's the set of launchpad scripts for helping deal with bugs, the apport tool which deals with crash and bug reporting on your desktop, and the checkbox folks who are helping . And we can't forget about website development! The ubuntu friendly folks could always use a hand in making that site a better experience. Pick one and start hacking! Or contribute something new to fill an itch not yet scratched.

Maybe your a tester. Someone who likes running bleeding edge code, or perhaps someone who can always find a bug. Your able to make even the most robust software quiver! There are many testing oppurtunites inside of ubuntu. I'll be detailing them further in future posts. For now, look at the Activities page on the wiki, join the mailing list and jump in as the calls for testing go out! In addition, check out the ubuntu+1 forums to chat and interact with others who share the same passion for ubuntu and testing.

How about being able to write? Are you able to explain technical jargon to others? There's opportunities for you as well. The wiki itself could always use some love, and there are test cases to write.  Specifically as of this writing the community is in need of your skills to help update and edit our suite of application test cases. Check out this post.

It's wonderful to be a part of the community. Join in!

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