Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'opportunity'

Nicholas Skaggs

The final images of what will become utopic are here! Yes, in just one short week utopic unicorn will be released into the world. Celebrate this exciting release and be among the first to run utopic by helping us test!

We need your help and test results, both positive and negative. Please head over to the milestone on the isotracker, select your favorite flavor, and perform the needed tests against the images.

If you've never submitted test results for the iso tracker, check out the handy links on top of the isotracker page detailing how to perform an image test, as well as a little about how the qatracker itself works. If you still aren't sure or get stuck, feel free to contact the qa community or myself for help.

Thank you for helping to make ubuntu better! Happy Testing!

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Nicholas Skaggs

As we continue to iterate on new ubuntu touch images, it's important for everyone to be able to enjoy the ubuntu phone experience in their native language. This is where you can help!

We need your input and help to make sure the phone images are well localized for your native language. If you've never contributed a translation before, this is a perfect opportunity for you to learn. There's a wiki guide to help you, along with translation teams who speak your language and can help.

Don't worry, you don't need a ubuntu phone to do this work. The wiki guide details how to translate using a phone, emulator, or even just your desktop PC running ubuntu. If nothing else, you can help review other folks translations by simply using launchpad in your web browser.

If this sounds interesting to you and the links don't make sense or you would like some more personal help, feel free to contact me. English is preferred, but in the spirit of translation feel free to contact me in French, Spanish or perhaps even German :-).

Happy Translating everyone!

P.S. If you are curious about the status of your language translation, or looking for known missing strings, have a look at the stats page kept by David Planella.

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Nicholas Skaggs

We're having our first hackfest of the utopic cycle this week on Tuesday, July 15th. You can catch us live in a hangout on ubuntuonair.com starting at 1900 UTC. Everything you need to know can be found on the wiki page for the event.

During the hangout, we'll be demonstrating writing a new manual testcase, as well as reviewing writing automated testcases. We'll be answering any questions you have as well about contributing a testcase.

We need your help to write some new testcases! We're targeting both manual and automated testcase, so everyone is welcome to pitch in.

We are looking at writing and finishing some testcases for ubuntu studio and some other flavors. All you need is some basic tester knowledge and the ability to write in English.

If you know python, we are also going to be hacking on the toolkit helper for autopilot for the ubuntu sdk. That's a mouthful! Specifically it's the helpers that we use for writing autopilot tests against ubuntu-sdk applications. All app developers make use of these helpers, and we need more of them to ensure we have good coverage for all components developers use. 

Don't worry about getting stuck, we'll be around to help, and there's guides to well, guide you!

Hope to see everyone there!

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Nicholas Skaggs

The first testing day of the utopic cycle is coming this week on Thursday, July 10th. You can catch us live in a hangout on ubuntuonair.com starting at 1900 UTC. We'll be demonstrating running and testing the development release of ubuntu, reporting test results, reporting bugs, and doing triage work. We'll also be availible to answer your questions and help you get started testing as well.

Please join us in testing utopic and helping the next release of ubuntu become the best it can be. Hope to see everyone there!

P.S. We have a team calendar that can help you keep track of the release schedule along with this and other events. Check it out!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Calling for your UOS users session!

Ubuntu Online Summit is approaching, happening on June 10th-12th.This time it's a bit different from how vUDS has been in the past. Rather than the narrower developer focus, this intends to be a full blown community summit. If you've attending things like ubuntu open week or a classroom session in the past, all of those types of sessions are welcome and encouraged too.

To help foster these types of sessions, there is a special Users track.

"The focus of the Users track is to highlight ways to get the most out of Ubuntu, on your laptop, your phone or your server. From detailed how-to sessions, to tips and tricks, and more, this track can provide something for everybody, regardless of skill level."

Track Leads:
Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph
Nicholas Skaggs
Valorie Zimmerman

I'm excitied to be a track lead for this track along with Liz and Val. We are all inviting you to consider scheduling a session to share your knowledge of ubuntu. Share an idea, discuss your passion, give a how-to, etc. The sessions in this track are meant for other users of ubuntu like yourself, so feel free to share.

Regardless of your desire to contribute a session, I would encourage everyone to take a look at the schedule as it evolves and considering joining in sessions they find interesting.
.
Remember, this track is your track and filled with your sessions. Let's help make the online summit a success.

So ready to propose a session? Checkout this page and feel free to ping Val, Liz or myself for help. Don't forget to register to attend and check out the currently scheduled sessions!

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Nicholas Skaggs


Since I last posted on the topic of our communities future, we've helped push out a new release of ubuntu. Saucy and fresh, the little salamander is now out in the wild. With the release out it's time to move forward with these changes.

(c) Carla Sella
The beginning of a new cycle is always a time to breathe for us in quality and these past few days of relative calm has indeed been a welcome respite from the craziness of testing leading up to a release.

We can rebuild it. We have the technology. Better than it was before. Better, stronger, faster.

So, let's talk about some of the changes coming to quality for this new cycle.

Defined Roles
I want to help our new members become a productive part of ubuntu quality as soon as possible. To this end I've created a list of roles for the quality team. By defining roles within the team it is easy to see how you can contribute as a 'tester', 'test writer', or 'developer'.

Contribute anytime
While release milestones and calls for testing will still be important, contributing to ubuntu quality can be a daily task. There are activities you can perform any day and anytime in the cycle. The roles pages list activities for each role that can be done right now. If you are a tester, check out the activities you can do right now to help!

More exploratory testing
We're iterating faster and faster. Builds of new code are landing each day, and in some cases several times a day. We can't afford to only test every other week with cadence testing. Instead, we've ramped up efforts to automatically test on each of these new builds. But we still need manual testing!

As a tester you can provide testing results for images, packages and hardware at any time! In addition, exploratory testing is highly encouraged. This is were we as manual testers shine! I want to encourage ongoing exploratory testing all throughout the cycle. Run and use the development version of ubuntu on your machine all the time!

Tackling some big projects
One of the things I wanted to push us as a team towards was tackling some projects that have a wider impact than just us. To that end, you can see several big projects on the activities pages for each role.

For testers, we are undertaking making reporting issues better for users. For the test writers, one of the largest projects is spearheading the effort to make manual image testing less burdensome and more automated by automating ubiquity testing. And for developers, the autopilot emulators are big projects as well and need help.

More involvement with bugs
As a quality community with interact with many bugs. Sometimes we are finding the bug, other times we might confirm them or verify a fix works. However, we haven't always gone the extra step towards doing work with SRU verifications and bug triage. The bugsquad and others have traditionally performed these tasks. If you'll notice these activities are now encouraged for those in the tester role. Let's dive more into the bug world.

A potential expansion of the team
With the mention of the bugsquad and the encouraged involvement with bugs for our team, I would like to propose a union between the quality and bugsquad teams. I would encourage current bugsquad members to take up tester roles, and consider some of the additional opportunities that are available. For those who have been testing with the quality team in past cycles, let's get more invovled with bugs and traditional bugsquad activities as mentioned above.


Making a quality LTS
Trusty Tahr is going to be the next LTS release. Those of you who remember and use Precise will agree that it is going to be a tough act to follow. The bar is set high, but I am confident we can reach it and do better.

We can't do this alone. We need testers, test writers, and developers! If you are interested in helping us achieve our goal, please join us! Now is an excellent time to learn and grow with the rest of us on the team. Thanks for helping making ubuntu better!

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Nicholas Skaggs

(c) http://www.flickr.com/photos/lalalaurie/
Here are 3 easy steps to testing prowess. Do your part to be prepared! Let's help make saucy a great release!

1) Review both the critical bugs and those found during isotesting throughout the cycle. This is handy in case you find something during testing and want to know if someone has already reported it or not.

2) Make sure you know how to use the tracker and how to test an iso. When the milestone is created and the images appear on October 10th, you want to be ready to go!

3) Test and report your results to the tracker ;-) Note, at this point in the cycle we prefer real hardware results. Upgrade your machine! Try a fresh install. If you've been sitting on raring, now is the time to migrate to saucy and let us know of any bugs you find.

Happy Testing!

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Nicholas Skaggs

We're still here and we're still testing!



And you can still join us!

Grab your nexus device, check out the wiki page, and flash away. File bugs, and keep ontop of the updates coming out. Use the device as you would any other phone. Ohh and check out the app development contest winners by installing the apps from the click store on the phone (check out the more suggestions section).

The release is only 2 weeks away. That's 14 days or a mere 336 hours. And we'll be spending 112 hours sleeping (perhaps less, get some sleep!). That leaves just 224 hours for testing. Join us!

#UbuntuTestDanceMaster out.

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Nicholas Skaggs

As I eluded to in my previous post, it's time for us as a community to fully embrace the place of automated testing in our workflows. Over the past year we've learned how to write testcases and to then apply that knowledge towards writing autopilot tests. At the same time ubuntu has been building testing infrastructure and launching a CI team to help run and maintain it.

With these changes and our acquired knowledge we can construct a sustainable vision for testing. So just what is that vision?

Let's make manual testing fun again. As we've ramped up our workloads, we find ourselves repetitively testing the same packages again and again (and running the same tests!). We'd call this regression testing and it's a perfect candidate for automated testing. Let's automate these tests and keep our focus on where we as humans excel.

In addition, we as a community participate in "calls for testing". These calls have become more and more exploratory in nature. In general, we have moved further away from a defined testcase ("perform steps 1, 2, and 3"). Instead, we encourage testers to adopt a try and break it attitude. This is where we as humans can excel, and you know what, have some fun at trying! Remember QA is the only place we encourage you to break things!

So let's get manual testing back to the exploratory testing we love.

Thank you little testing robot!
Let's expand our automated tests. We can increase testing coverage forever with a one time investment of writing a testcase. Developers, write tests for your code and feature sets as you develop them. As a quality community, let's do our best to make it easy for developers to do so.

In addition, a well written bug report can become an excellent testcase to be added to the application testuite. Let's look at bug reports for potential testcases. We can write the test and then forget it. The little robots will tell us if it becomes a problem again in the future and even prevent the bad code from getting shipped where it can break our machines (again). Not bad little robots!

So let's focus on ensuring tests exist for critical regressions when they get fixed.

Let's tackle some big projects. Who said we can't achieve amazing things in the quality community? This vision would be nothing more than an idea without some actions behind it!

Right now we as a community already have a chance to put these ideas in action. Exploratory testing is happening right now on the phablet devices. Get involved! This is the manual, have fun and try and break it, exploratory testing we all love. Even without a phablet device, regressions can be turned into autopilot tests. This meets our goal to expand our automated tests and to look at bugs as potential sources for those tests.

All test and no play makes for a sad image
Moving forward there are still a some big projects to tackle. One of the largest is the amount of manual testing effort required in cadence and milestone testing. We can bring automated testing to the mix to both reduce our on-going effort and raise the quality bar in our releases.

So let's be the leaders for change in ubuntu.

Are you in?

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Nicholas Skaggs

As of today, we are exactly one month away from the release of Saucy Salamander. As part of that release, ubuntu is committed to delivering an image of ubuntu-touch, ready to install on supported devices.

And while folks have been dogfooding the images since May, many changes have continued to land as the images mature. As such, the qa team is committing to test each of the stable images released, and do exploratory testing against new features and specific packagesets.

If you have a device, I would encourage you to join this effort! Everything you need to know can be found upon this wiki page. You'll need a nexus device and a little time to spend with the latest image. If you find a bug, report it! The wiki has links to help. Testing doesn't get anymore fun than this; flash your phone and try to break it! Go wild!

And if you don't own a device? You can still help! As bugs are found and fixed, the second part of the process is to create automated tests for them so they don't occur again. Any bug you see on the list is a potential candidate, but we'll be marking those we especially think would be useful to write an autopilot tests for with a " touch-needs-autopilot" tag.

Join us in testing, confirming bugs, or testwriting autopilot tests. We want the ubuntu touch images to be the best they can be in 1 month's time. Happy Testing!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Jamming Quality Style

It's that time of year again! Time to get your jam on (I like mine on a bagel).
  

While you are making plans for Ubuntu Global Jam, don't forget you can contribute to quality as well. There's a separate subpage of the global jam wiki dedicated to it.

We love new test contributions, and there's a collection of wiki tutorials and videos to help you contribute them. You don't have to be technical to write tests -- we need manual testcases also which are written in plain English :-)

More interested in submitting your results for tests? We've also got you covered. We have tests for the default applications of ubuntu as well as the images of ubuntu. Download an image and run it on your machine. Try running through some default testcases for ubuntu or your favorite flavor. An image and a pc or laptop is all you need to get started. Happy Jamming!

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Nicholas Skaggs

The calculator app is probably the biggest fashion saving application (for me!) on the platform. You might be scratching your heads, so let me share a quick story.

You see not unlike the crazy pebble watch idea, there was a time when I wore a crazy watch on my wrist.

Remember these?

I proudly wore my calculator watch for maybe a year before breaking the band after catching the giant display on something :-) That was the last time a watch graced my arm in a permanent fashion. Ahh the memories.

So, this app will make sure such a fashion disaster doesn't have to happen again. Thanks to the calculator app, I can still perform those geeky tasks of calculating out gas mileage, perfect tipping, supermarket costs, etc without the paying the ultimate fashion price.

The foundations are already in place for you to add tests, but more are needed, including testing the cool "tear-off" feature, swiping to delete, and historical calculations.


Consider helping the calculator developers keep development going.  Grab the calculator branchadd a testcase from the list of needsfollow the tutorial for help if needed, and propose a merge. Thanks for helping to ensure quality for ubuntu touch!

If you need help getting started, there are 2 more workshops planned for this week. In addition the logs, and a FAQ from the workshops are now available and ready for you to consume and understand. Happy test writing!

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Nicholas Skaggs

When your like me and work with wonderful people across the world, knowing what time it is turns out to be really important. It's important to know what time it is in my timezone and the timezone of others I work with around the world.

Even sticking with my own timezone, I use my my clock to wake me each morning, keep track of my running, and let me time things while cooking (proper eggs anyone?) :-) Nekhelesh Ramananthan and the other clock developers are tackling all of these problems with the clock app. Sadly unlike sudoku, I haven't found a way how to cheat time.

Tick tock goes the clock

With that in mind, it's important the clock app gets it's fair share of testing! Nekhelesh has added some tests from the buglist, but some of the tests require further feature development. Since we can't stop time (well at least I can't!), it would be a great help to have someone come alongside these developers and add some testcases so they can focus on the application itself.

Consider helping the clock developers keep the clock regression free and well tested as it's features mature.  Grab the clock branchadd a testcase from the list of needsfollow the tutorial for help if needed, and propose a merge. Thanks for helping to ensure quality for ubuntu touch!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Recently we've been on a campaign to help increase the amount of automated tests we have for ubuntu. Specifically the effort is focused around helping out our community developers on the core apps project. The core apps project is building the core applications for ubuntu touch. Excellent stuff, all being done by the community!

The "testing all the things" blog series is currently covering each of these core applications and ends with a call to help the development teams. I've linked to tutorials like this and this on autopilot providing what you need to know. But sometimes seeing is understanding, and a helping hand can go a long way.

With that in mind, I am announcing a series of workshops to help you gather the skills needed to write automated tests. You can help contribute with just your ubuntu pc, writing and running tests without needing phone hardware! We're going to focus on autopilot, and for the moment the ubuntu core apps. I'll try and alternate to host them at timezone friendly times for everyone (granted I do have to sleep at some point too!). Here's the schedule, with links to the event on G+ page.

Tomorrow!, Wednesday July 3rd at 1800 UTC
Friday July 5th at 1300 UTC
Tuesday July 9th at 1800 UTC
Thursday July 11th at 2200 UTC

The workshops will take place in #ubuntu-quality and will all last an hour (but I won't leave you hanging if we need more time!). I'll host g+ hangouts and provide one on one help as needed to anyone writing tests. See you at the workshops!

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Nicholas Skaggs

In honor of the closing of google reader, I thought I would highlight another core application that needs some attention; namely the RSS Reader, with a proper name Shorts. If your already bored and yawning (RSS is dead, long live RSS), have a look at the design's recently shared by the design team as well as the original post with the user stories. Seems like RSS might not be so dead (or look it!)!

Yes, I still use RSS feeds, mainly as a news aggregator. In many ways honestly RSS feeds have long replaced my idea of bookmarking things. Bookmarks are general stale old content that never updates, is never refreshed and is eventually just purged. The ideas shown in the design of Shorts are great and the development team has a wonderful task ahead of them of implementing them.


With the development team focused on getting the code written, it's our opportunity to help out by adding testcases for there work. For instance, simple things like adding, editing, and removing a rss feed all need tested. The testcases are ready and waiting for you to add a test!

Consider helping the shorts developers get everything in shape. Grab the rss reader branchadd a testcase from the list of needsfollow the tutorial for help if needed, and propose a merge. Thanks for helping to ensure quality for ubuntu touch!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Coming off a lovely weekend, it's time we turned our attention to an app on the lighter side. Anyone up for a game of sudoku?


Sudoku is an example of a simple logic game that can be learned easily enough yet has the staying power to intrigue me to continue to play it. Dinko Osmankovic and the rest of the Sudoku Touch developers have created a version for ubuntu touch to fill those critical mundane moments of the day -- waiting for a train or having your morning coffee. Or perhaps if your like me, fighting insomnia (yikes!).

Apparently using the show hints button to play the entire game makes me a cheat.
So, while it seems the game is smart enough to slap me for trying to cheat my way through, it needs some testcases! Looking at the buglist, there are seven tasty bugs with your potential name on them. This is testing at it's finest! It's rare to count playing a game as helping ubuntu -- but in this case, you would be right!
Themes support!
Consider helping the sudoku touch developers as the game and it's features mature.  Grab the sudoku branch, add a testcase from the list of needs, follow the tutorial for help if needed, and propose a merge. Thanks for helping to ensure quality for ubuntu touch!

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Nicholas Skaggs

A good calendar is essential to me. I'm liable to forget almost everything about my day except eating :-) Things like day of the week and month are important details I definitely rely on a calendar for (I can usually get the month right!).

Fortunately for me (and you!), there is a core app that provides a handy Calendar. Michael Hall featured this application a few weeks ago on his blog covering a development rundown of the application. It covers the list of features nicely. In a word, there's a lot of neat stuff to test in there.

Looking at the buglist of needs there are only 2 showing in-progress -- plenty of room for someone to help out by testing each one of the different views. Monthly, daily, weekly; accessed via swiping.

" Swiping left and right on the month will take you back or forward a month at a time.  Swiping left or right on the bottom half will take you back and forward a day at a time.

Pull the event area down and let it go, and the month will collapse down into a single week. Now swiping left and right there will move you back and forward a week at a time.  Pull down and let it go again and it will snap back to showing the full month.
Finally, you have an option in the toolbar (swipe up from the bottom edge) to switch from an event list to a timeline view of your events."

Are you dizzy yet?

These seamless transitions could use some cool testcases! At the moment, the app is seeing it's first merge requests being made by Carla Sella and Kunal Parmar. The team has faced some issues with uncovering some unique requirements for autopilot, which have now been fixed. Excellent work both of you!

Consider helping Carla, Kunal and the ubuntu calendar developers as the application and it's features mature.  Grab the calendar branch, add a testcase from the list of needs, follow the tutorial for help if needed, and propose a merge. Thanks for helping be a part of ubuntu!


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Nicholas Skaggs

I couldn't help but start with one of the core apps I consider essential (to me anyway!) on my phone, a terminal. The terminal app being developed for ubuntu has some wonderful features built with a touch interface in mind. One of the biggest issues with touch is having a terminal ready keyboard with things like page up and down, arrow keys, and not to mention being able to use keyboard shortcuts like ctrl+d, ctrl+z, ctrl+c, etc. This has been handled rather elegantly with a long tap menu as you can see below, in addition to a panel that optionally appears at the top of the application.


Dmitry Zagnoyko has already landed a few tests for some of the features present, as you can see below. Execellent work Dmitry! A basic testcase exists now for each of the panels and the circle menu.



Help Dmitry and the terminal app team make sure all the features work properly for you upon release. Get involved and add a test. The initial setup work has already been done, and there are existing testcases already written. Grab the terminal branch, add a testcase from the list of needs, follow the tutorial for help if needed, and propose a merge.


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Nicholas Skaggs

As a quality community team, we've been continuing to make progress this cycle on automating our testcases, especially the new applications that are being written for ubuntu touch. These 'core apps' are being written by other community members for the next generation of ubuntu.

We're also making progress on our desktop applications and automating the ubiquity installer. With that in mind, I'm going to start a little blog series highlighting a package a day for automating. I'll dub it rather unoriginally "Testing All The Things". My goal is to showcase the wonderful work going on with testing this cycle in ubuntu, but also to encourage you dear reader to get involved in helping us. All areas of ubuntu (flavors too!) can benefit from some robot friends helping test the packages they work on and utilize.

But you don't need to wait to see your favorite app hit the list. Hit up the tutorials below for information to dive in and help us!


Core Apps Test Wiki
Writing an autopilot test for ubuntu sdk applications
QML Autopilot Tutorial with example application

Autopilot Tests Project
Writing an autopilot test for desktop applications 


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Nicholas Skaggs

A few months ago the ubuntu touch core apps project was launched. For those of you following along with Michael's regular updates have gotten to see these applications grow up rather quickly.

Autopilot Says: How can I help?
Now it's time to add some more testing around these applications as they have reached a basic functional level of usability. Automated testing via autopilot to the rescue!

To help kickstart this process we've put together a recipe for writing autopilot tests specific to QML applications and added it to developer.ubuntu.com. In addition, we'll be hosting a hackfest next week on June 13th to help add basic autopilot testcases for each of the core apps. Folks will be on-hand ready to field your questions and hack together on the autopilot testcases needed for the applications. Join us and help support the wonderful community of application developers making awesome applications for ubuntu!

So how can you help? 
  1. First, go read through the recipe on writing autopilot tests for QML applications. It's also a good idea to have a look through the official tutorial for autopilot and bookmark the API reference link so it's handy.
  2. Armed with your new knowledge, start hacking on some autopilot tests for the core apps. Here's a list of core applications along with the status of autopilot tests. Choose something that looks interesting to you and add some tests.
  3. Follow the contributing guide to help you get your work contributed into the ubuntu touch core application project you chose.
  4. Finally come out to the hackfest! It's your chance to share your work, ask questions, get your tests sorted and merged and socialize and meet other members of the community.
  5. Don't forget there is a wonderful quality community you can be a part of and get help from if you get stuck! There's a mailing list for ubuntu-touch, and ubuntu-quality as well as IRC channels #ubuntu-touch, #ubuntu-autopilot and #ubuntu-quality. Use these resources to help you!
See you next week and happy testing!

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