Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'opportunity'

Nicholas Skaggs

Google Code In 2015

As you may have heard, ubuntu has been selected as a mentoring organization for Google Code In (GCI). GCI is a opportunity for high school students to learn about and participate in open source communities. As a mentoring organization, we'll create tasks and review the students work. Google recruits the students and provides rewards for those who do the best work. The 2015 contest runs from December 7, 2015 to January 25, 2016.

Are you excited?
On December 7th, we'll be gaining a whole slew of potential contributors. Interested students will select from the tasks we as a community have put forth and start working them. That means we need your help to both create those tasks, and mentor incoming students.

I know, I know, it sounds like work. And it is a bit of work, but not as much as you think. Mentors need to provide a task description and be available for questions if needed. Once the task is complete, check the work and mark the task complete. You can be a mentor for as little as a single task. The full details and FAQ can be found on the wiki. Volunteering to be a mentor means you get to create tasks to be worked, and you agree to review them as well. You aren't expected to teach someone how to code, write documentation, translate, do QA, etc, in a few weeks. Breathe easy.

You can help!
I know there is plenty of potential tasks lying in wait for someone to come along and help out. This is a great opportunity for us as a community to both gain a potential contributor, and get work done. I trust you will consider being a part of the process.

I'm still not sure
Please, do have a look at the FAQ, as well as the mentor guide. If that's not enough to convince you of the merits of the program, I'd invite you to read one student's feedback about his experience participating last year. Being a mentor is a great way to give back to ubuntu, get invovled and potentially gain new members.

I'm in, what should I do?
Contact myself, popey, or José who can add you as a mentor for the organization. This will allow you to add tasks and participate in the process. Here's to a great GCI!

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Nicholas Skaggs

It's finally here! We've been working on a way to allow those who have a ubuntu phone to participate more directly in testing the software that runs on their device. This includes things like helping test OTA updates before they are shipped and to verify and look for bugs in applications like the core apps and system services.

Introducing Pilot, a new application you can find today in the ubuntu store. The application utilizes checkbox as a way of distributing tests to you on the phone. This first round of testing includes tests from 4 of your favorite core applications including dekko, clock, music, and weather.

To help test, search for Pilot in the store and install it.

Start the app, and click the Start Testing button once it's loaded.

Select a test plan to run. Right now you can choose to test specific features of the different core apps.

Select the tests to run. You can choose to run all of tests for that feature, or just one if you wish.

Run through the test, following each step. If everything works as listed in the test, press the Pass button. Otherwise press Fail.

You can also add comments about the test or skip the test using the buttons at the top of this page.

Finally, submit your results back to the QA team by pressing the Submit Results to Community Practitest button. You'll need to supply your ubuntu SSO information to do so. You may also view your submitted results on this screen by pressing the corresponding button.

It's that easy. Over time, we'll push new tests via application updates, so you can help test new things as they are developed. As the number of devices grows, we want to ensure every device has the same level of quality. With your help, we can make sure ubuntu gets better with each update. Thanks for your help!

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Nicholas Skaggs

I wanted to share a unique opportunity to get invovled with ubuntu and testing. Last cycle, as part of a datacenter shuffle, the automated installer testing that was occurring for ubuntu flavors stopped running. The images were being test automatically via a series of autopilot tests, written originally by the community (Thanks Dan et la!). These tests are vital in helping reduce the burden of manual testing required for images by running through the base manual test cases for each image automatically each day.

When it was noticed the tests didn't run this cycle, wxl from Lubuntu accordingly filed an RT to discover what happened. Unfortunately, it seems the CI team within Canonical can no longer run these tests. The good news however is that we as a community can run them ourselves instead.

To start exploring the idea of self-hosting and running the tests, I initially asked Daniel Chapman to take a look. Given the impending landing of dekko in the default ubuntu image, Daniel certainly has his hands full. As such Daniel Kessel has offered to help out and begun some initial investigations into the tests and server needs. A big thanks to Daniel and Daniel!

But they need your help! The autopilot tests for ubiquity have a few bugs that need solving. And a server and jenkins need to be setup, installed, and maintained. Finally, we need to think about reporting these results to places like the isotracker. For more information, you can read more about how to run the tests locally to give you a better idea of how they work.

The needed skillsets are diverse. Are you interested in helping make flavors better? Do you have some technical skills in writing tests, the web, python, or running a jenkins server? Or perhaps you are willing to learn? If so, please get in touch!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Unity 8 Desktop Testing

While much of the excitement around unity8 and the next generation of ubuntu has revolved around mobile, again I'd like to point your attention to the desktop. The unity8 desktop is starting to evolve and gain more "desktopy" features. This includes things like window management and keyboard shortcuts for unity8, and MIR enhancements with things like native library support for rendering and support for X11 applications.

I hosted a session with Stephen Webb at UOS last year where we discussed the status of running unity8 on the desktop. During the session I mentioned my own personal goal of having some brave community members running unity8 as there default desktop this cycle. Now, it's still a bit early to realize that goal, but it is getting much closer! To help get there, I would encourage you to have a look at unity8 on your desktop and start running it. The development teams are ready for feedback and anxious to get it in shape on the desktop.

So how do you get it? Check out the unity8 desktop wiki page which explains how you can run unity8, even if you are on a stable version of ubuntu like the LTS. Install it locally in an lxc container and you can login to a unity8 desktop on your current pc. Check it out! After you finish playing, please don't forget to file bugs for anything you might find. The wiki page has you covered there as well. Enjoy unity8!

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Nicholas Skaggs

PSA: Community Requests

As you plan your ubuntu related activities this year, I wanted to highlight an opportunity for you to request materials and funds to help make your plans reality. The funds are donations made by other ubuntu enthusiasts to support ubuntu and specifically to enable community requests. In other words, if you need help traveling to a conference to support ubuntu, planning a local event, holding a hackathon, etc, the community donations fund can help.

Check out the funding page for more information on how to apply and the requirements. In short, if you are a ubuntu member and want to do something to further ubuntu, you can request materials and funding to help. Global Jam is less than a month away, is your loco ready? Flavors, trying to plan events or hold other activities? I'd encourage all of you to submit requests if money or materials can help enable or enhance your efforts to spread ubuntu. Here's to sharing the joy of ubuntu this year!

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Nicholas Skaggs

I thought I would add a little festivity to the holiday season, quality style. In case your holidays just are not the same without a little quality in your life, allow me to share how you can get involved.

There are opportunities for every role listed on the QA wiki. Testers and test writers are both needed. Testing and writing manual tests can be learned by anyone, no coding required. That said if you have skills or interest in technical work, I would encourage you help out. You will learn by doing and get help from others while you do it.

Now onto the good stuff! What can you do to help ubuntu this cycle from a quality perspective?

There is an ever present need for brave folks willing to simply run the development version of ubuntu and use it as a daily machine throughout the cycle. It's one of the best ways for us as a community to uncover bugs and issues, in particular things that regress from the previous release. Upgrade to vivid today and see what you can break!

This tool is written in drupal7 and runs the and sites. These sites are used to record and view the results of all of our manual testing efforts. Currently dkessel is leading the effort on implementing some needed UI changes. The code and more information about the project can be found on launchpad. The tracker is one of our primary tools and needs your help to become friendly for everyone to use.

In addition a charm would be useful to simplify setting up a development environment. The charm can be based upon the existing drupal charm. At the moment this work is ready for someone to jump in.

Running unity8 as a full-time desktop is a personal goal I have for this cycle. I hope some others might also want to be early adopters and join me in this goal. For now you can help by testing the unity8 desktop. Have a look at running unity in lxc for an easy way to run unity8 today on your machine. Use it, test it, and offer feedback. I'll be talking more about unity8 as the cycle progresses and opportunities to test new features aimed at the desktop appear.

Core Apps
The core apps project is an excellent way to get involved. These applications have been lovingly developed by community members just like you. Many of the teams are looking for help in writing tests and for someone who can help bring a testing mindset and eye to the work. As of this writing specifically the docviewer, terminal and calculator teams would love your help. The core apps hackdays are happening this week, drop by and introduce yourself to get started!

Manual Tests
Like the sound of writing tests but the idea of writing code turns you off? Manual tests are needed as well! They are written in English and are easy to understand and write. Manual tests include everything you see on the qatracker and are managed as a launchpad project. This means you can pick a bug and "fix it" by submitting a merge request. The bugs involve both fixing existing tests as well as requests for new testcases.

As always there are images that need testing. Testing milestones occur later in the cycle which involve everyone helping to test a specific set of images. In the meantime, daily images are generated that have made it through the automated tests and are ready for manual testing. Booting an image in a live session is a great way to check for regressions on your machine. Doing this early in the cycle can help make sure your hardware and others like it experience a regression free upgrade when the time comes.

After subjecting software to testing, bugs are naturally found. These bugs then need to be verified and triaged. The bugsquadders, as they are called, would be happy to help you learn to categorize or triage bugs and do other tasks.

No matter how you choose to get involved, feel free to contact me for help if needed. Most of all, Happy Testing!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Ubuntu Online Summit: Vivid Edition

Ubuntu Online Summit is once again upon us. This is a community event by and for the community. It's all encompassing and intends to cover a wide range of topics. You don't need to be a developer, project lead, member of a team, or even a member of ubuntu to join and participate. The only requirement is your passion for ubuntu and desire to discuss about it's future with others.

The dates are set as November 12-November 14th from 1400 UTC to 2000 UTC. I am once again privileged to be a track lead for the users track. In my opinion, this is the best track as it's the one the largest number of us within the community can easily feel a part of (just don't like Michael, David, Daniel or Alan know I said that). Do you use ubuntu? Awesome, this is the track for you.

What I'm asking for is sessions. Have an idea for a session? Please propose it! Everything you need to know about participating can be found here. If you've attended things like ubuntu open week or a classroom session in the past, all of those types of sessions are welcome and encouraged.

"The focus of the Users track is to highlight ways to get the most out of Ubuntu, on your laptop, your phone or your server. From detailed how-to sessions, to tips and tricks, and more, this track can provide something for everybody, regardless of skill level."

Regardless of your desire to contribute a session, I would encourage everyone to take a look at the schedule as it evolves and considering joining in sessions they find interesting. In addition, it's not yet too late to offer up ideas for sessions (though I would encourage you to find a way to host the session).

Ready to propose a session? Checkout this page and feel free to ping me or any track lead for help. Don't forget to register to attend and check out the currently scheduled sessions!

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Nicholas Skaggs

The final images of what will become utopic are here! Yes, in just one short week utopic unicorn will be released into the world. Celebrate this exciting release and be among the first to run utopic by helping us test!

We need your help and test results, both positive and negative. Please head over to the milestone on the isotracker, select your favorite flavor, and perform the needed tests against the images.

If you've never submitted test results for the iso tracker, check out the handy links on top of the isotracker page detailing how to perform an image test, as well as a little about how the qatracker itself works. If you still aren't sure or get stuck, feel free to contact the qa community or myself for help.

Thank you for helping to make ubuntu better! Happy Testing!

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Nicholas Skaggs

As we continue to iterate on new ubuntu touch images, it's important for everyone to be able to enjoy the ubuntu phone experience in their native language. This is where you can help!

We need your input and help to make sure the phone images are well localized for your native language. If you've never contributed a translation before, this is a perfect opportunity for you to learn. There's a wiki guide to help you, along with translation teams who speak your language and can help.

Don't worry, you don't need a ubuntu phone to do this work. The wiki guide details how to translate using a phone, emulator, or even just your desktop PC running ubuntu. If nothing else, you can help review other folks translations by simply using launchpad in your web browser.

If this sounds interesting to you and the links don't make sense or you would like some more personal help, feel free to contact me. English is preferred, but in the spirit of translation feel free to contact me in French, Spanish or perhaps even German :-).

Happy Translating everyone!

P.S. If you are curious about the status of your language translation, or looking for known missing strings, have a look at the stats page kept by David Planella.

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Nicholas Skaggs

We're having our first hackfest of the utopic cycle this week on Tuesday, July 15th. You can catch us live in a hangout on starting at 1900 UTC. Everything you need to know can be found on the wiki page for the event.

During the hangout, we'll be demonstrating writing a new manual testcase, as well as reviewing writing automated testcases. We'll be answering any questions you have as well about contributing a testcase.

We need your help to write some new testcases! We're targeting both manual and automated testcase, so everyone is welcome to pitch in.

We are looking at writing and finishing some testcases for ubuntu studio and some other flavors. All you need is some basic tester knowledge and the ability to write in English.

If you know python, we are also going to be hacking on the toolkit helper for autopilot for the ubuntu sdk. That's a mouthful! Specifically it's the helpers that we use for writing autopilot tests against ubuntu-sdk applications. All app developers make use of these helpers, and we need more of them to ensure we have good coverage for all components developers use. 

Don't worry about getting stuck, we'll be around to help, and there's guides to well, guide you!

Hope to see everyone there!

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Nicholas Skaggs

The first testing day of the utopic cycle is coming this week on Thursday, July 10th. You can catch us live in a hangout on starting at 1900 UTC. We'll be demonstrating running and testing the development release of ubuntu, reporting test results, reporting bugs, and doing triage work. We'll also be availible to answer your questions and help you get started testing as well.

Please join us in testing utopic and helping the next release of ubuntu become the best it can be. Hope to see everyone there!

P.S. We have a team calendar that can help you keep track of the release schedule along with this and other events. Check it out!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Calling for your UOS users session!

Ubuntu Online Summit is approaching, happening on June 10th-12th.This time it's a bit different from how vUDS has been in the past. Rather than the narrower developer focus, this intends to be a full blown community summit. If you've attending things like ubuntu open week or a classroom session in the past, all of those types of sessions are welcome and encouraged too.

To help foster these types of sessions, there is a special Users track.

"The focus of the Users track is to highlight ways to get the most out of Ubuntu, on your laptop, your phone or your server. From detailed how-to sessions, to tips and tricks, and more, this track can provide something for everybody, regardless of skill level."

Track Leads:
Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph
Nicholas Skaggs
Valorie Zimmerman

I'm excitied to be a track lead for this track along with Liz and Val. We are all inviting you to consider scheduling a session to share your knowledge of ubuntu. Share an idea, discuss your passion, give a how-to, etc. The sessions in this track are meant for other users of ubuntu like yourself, so feel free to share.

Regardless of your desire to contribute a session, I would encourage everyone to take a look at the schedule as it evolves and considering joining in sessions they find interesting.
Remember, this track is your track and filled with your sessions. Let's help make the online summit a success.

So ready to propose a session? Checkout this page and feel free to ping Val, Liz or myself for help. Don't forget to register to attend and check out the currently scheduled sessions!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Since I last posted on the topic of our communities future, we've helped push out a new release of ubuntu. Saucy and fresh, the little salamander is now out in the wild. With the release out it's time to move forward with these changes.

(c) Carla Sella
The beginning of a new cycle is always a time to breathe for us in quality and these past few days of relative calm has indeed been a welcome respite from the craziness of testing leading up to a release.

We can rebuild it. We have the technology. Better than it was before. Better, stronger, faster.

So, let's talk about some of the changes coming to quality for this new cycle.

Defined Roles
I want to help our new members become a productive part of ubuntu quality as soon as possible. To this end I've created a list of roles for the quality team. By defining roles within the team it is easy to see how you can contribute as a 'tester', 'test writer', or 'developer'.

Contribute anytime
While release milestones and calls for testing will still be important, contributing to ubuntu quality can be a daily task. There are activities you can perform any day and anytime in the cycle. The roles pages list activities for each role that can be done right now. If you are a tester, check out the activities you can do right now to help!

More exploratory testing
We're iterating faster and faster. Builds of new code are landing each day, and in some cases several times a day. We can't afford to only test every other week with cadence testing. Instead, we've ramped up efforts to automatically test on each of these new builds. But we still need manual testing!

As a tester you can provide testing results for images, packages and hardware at any time! In addition, exploratory testing is highly encouraged. This is were we as manual testers shine! I want to encourage ongoing exploratory testing all throughout the cycle. Run and use the development version of ubuntu on your machine all the time!

Tackling some big projects
One of the things I wanted to push us as a team towards was tackling some projects that have a wider impact than just us. To that end, you can see several big projects on the activities pages for each role.

For testers, we are undertaking making reporting issues better for users. For the test writers, one of the largest projects is spearheading the effort to make manual image testing less burdensome and more automated by automating ubiquity testing. And for developers, the autopilot emulators are big projects as well and need help.

More involvement with bugs
As a quality community with interact with many bugs. Sometimes we are finding the bug, other times we might confirm them or verify a fix works. However, we haven't always gone the extra step towards doing work with SRU verifications and bug triage. The bugsquad and others have traditionally performed these tasks. If you'll notice these activities are now encouraged for those in the tester role. Let's dive more into the bug world.

A potential expansion of the team
With the mention of the bugsquad and the encouraged involvement with bugs for our team, I would like to propose a union between the quality and bugsquad teams. I would encourage current bugsquad members to take up tester roles, and consider some of the additional opportunities that are available. For those who have been testing with the quality team in past cycles, let's get more invovled with bugs and traditional bugsquad activities as mentioned above.

Making a quality LTS
Trusty Tahr is going to be the next LTS release. Those of you who remember and use Precise will agree that it is going to be a tough act to follow. The bar is set high, but I am confident we can reach it and do better.

We can't do this alone. We need testers, test writers, and developers! If you are interested in helping us achieve our goal, please join us! Now is an excellent time to learn and grow with the rest of us on the team. Thanks for helping making ubuntu better!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Here are 3 easy steps to testing prowess. Do your part to be prepared! Let's help make saucy a great release!

1) Review both the critical bugs and those found during isotesting throughout the cycle. This is handy in case you find something during testing and want to know if someone has already reported it or not.

2) Make sure you know how to use the tracker and how to test an iso. When the milestone is created and the images appear on October 10th, you want to be ready to go!

3) Test and report your results to the tracker ;-) Note, at this point in the cycle we prefer real hardware results. Upgrade your machine! Try a fresh install. If you've been sitting on raring, now is the time to migrate to saucy and let us know of any bugs you find.

Happy Testing!

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Nicholas Skaggs

We're still here and we're still testing!

And you can still join us!

Grab your nexus device, check out the wiki page, and flash away. File bugs, and keep ontop of the updates coming out. Use the device as you would any other phone. Ohh and check out the app development contest winners by installing the apps from the click store on the phone (check out the more suggestions section).

The release is only 2 weeks away. That's 14 days or a mere 336 hours. And we'll be spending 112 hours sleeping (perhaps less, get some sleep!). That leaves just 224 hours for testing. Join us!

#UbuntuTestDanceMaster out.

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Nicholas Skaggs

As I eluded to in my previous post, it's time for us as a community to fully embrace the place of automated testing in our workflows. Over the past year we've learned how to write testcases and to then apply that knowledge towards writing autopilot tests. At the same time ubuntu has been building testing infrastructure and launching a CI team to help run and maintain it.

With these changes and our acquired knowledge we can construct a sustainable vision for testing. So just what is that vision?

Let's make manual testing fun again. As we've ramped up our workloads, we find ourselves repetitively testing the same packages again and again (and running the same tests!). We'd call this regression testing and it's a perfect candidate for automated testing. Let's automate these tests and keep our focus on where we as humans excel.

In addition, we as a community participate in "calls for testing". These calls have become more and more exploratory in nature. In general, we have moved further away from a defined testcase ("perform steps 1, 2, and 3"). Instead, we encourage testers to adopt a try and break it attitude. This is where we as humans can excel, and you know what, have some fun at trying! Remember QA is the only place we encourage you to break things!

So let's get manual testing back to the exploratory testing we love.

Thank you little testing robot!
Let's expand our automated tests. We can increase testing coverage forever with a one time investment of writing a testcase. Developers, write tests for your code and feature sets as you develop them. As a quality community, let's do our best to make it easy for developers to do so.

In addition, a well written bug report can become an excellent testcase to be added to the application testuite. Let's look at bug reports for potential testcases. We can write the test and then forget it. The little robots will tell us if it becomes a problem again in the future and even prevent the bad code from getting shipped where it can break our machines (again). Not bad little robots!

So let's focus on ensuring tests exist for critical regressions when they get fixed.

Let's tackle some big projects. Who said we can't achieve amazing things in the quality community? This vision would be nothing more than an idea without some actions behind it!

Right now we as a community already have a chance to put these ideas in action. Exploratory testing is happening right now on the phablet devices. Get involved! This is the manual, have fun and try and break it, exploratory testing we all love. Even without a phablet device, regressions can be turned into autopilot tests. This meets our goal to expand our automated tests and to look at bugs as potential sources for those tests.

All test and no play makes for a sad image
Moving forward there are still a some big projects to tackle. One of the largest is the amount of manual testing effort required in cadence and milestone testing. We can bring automated testing to the mix to both reduce our on-going effort and raise the quality bar in our releases.

So let's be the leaders for change in ubuntu.

Are you in?

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Nicholas Skaggs

As of today, we are exactly one month away from the release of Saucy Salamander. As part of that release, ubuntu is committed to delivering an image of ubuntu-touch, ready to install on supported devices.

And while folks have been dogfooding the images since May, many changes have continued to land as the images mature. As such, the qa team is committing to test each of the stable images released, and do exploratory testing against new features and specific packagesets.

If you have a device, I would encourage you to join this effort! Everything you need to know can be found upon this wiki page. You'll need a nexus device and a little time to spend with the latest image. If you find a bug, report it! The wiki has links to help. Testing doesn't get anymore fun than this; flash your phone and try to break it! Go wild!

And if you don't own a device? You can still help! As bugs are found and fixed, the second part of the process is to create automated tests for them so they don't occur again. Any bug you see on the list is a potential candidate, but we'll be marking those we especially think would be useful to write an autopilot tests for with a " touch-needs-autopilot" tag.

Join us in testing, confirming bugs, or testwriting autopilot tests. We want the ubuntu touch images to be the best they can be in 1 month's time. Happy Testing!

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Nicholas Skaggs

Jamming Quality Style

It's that time of year again! Time to get your jam on (I like mine on a bagel).

While you are making plans for Ubuntu Global Jam, don't forget you can contribute to quality as well. There's a separate subpage of the global jam wiki dedicated to it.

We love new test contributions, and there's a collection of wiki tutorials and videos to help you contribute them. You don't have to be technical to write tests -- we need manual testcases also which are written in plain English :-)

More interested in submitting your results for tests? We've also got you covered. We have tests for the default applications of ubuntu as well as the images of ubuntu. Download an image and run it on your machine. Try running through some default testcases for ubuntu or your favorite flavor. An image and a pc or laptop is all you need to get started. Happy Jamming!

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Nicholas Skaggs

The calculator app is probably the biggest fashion saving application (for me!) on the platform. You might be scratching your heads, so let me share a quick story.

You see not unlike the crazy pebble watch idea, there was a time when I wore a crazy watch on my wrist.

Remember these?

I proudly wore my calculator watch for maybe a year before breaking the band after catching the giant display on something :-) That was the last time a watch graced my arm in a permanent fashion. Ahh the memories.

So, this app will make sure such a fashion disaster doesn't have to happen again. Thanks to the calculator app, I can still perform those geeky tasks of calculating out gas mileage, perfect tipping, supermarket costs, etc without the paying the ultimate fashion price.

The foundations are already in place for you to add tests, but more are needed, including testing the cool "tear-off" feature, swiping to delete, and historical calculations.

Consider helping the calculator developers keep development going.  Grab the calculator branchadd a testcase from the list of needsfollow the tutorial for help if needed, and propose a merge. Thanks for helping to ensure quality for ubuntu touch!

If you need help getting started, there are 2 more workshops planned for this week. In addition the logs, and a FAQ from the workshops are now available and ready for you to consume and understand. Happy test writing!

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Nicholas Skaggs

When your like me and work with wonderful people across the world, knowing what time it is turns out to be really important. It's important to know what time it is in my timezone and the timezone of others I work with around the world.

Even sticking with my own timezone, I use my my clock to wake me each morning, keep track of my running, and let me time things while cooking (proper eggs anyone?) :-) Nekhelesh Ramananthan and the other clock developers are tackling all of these problems with the clock app. Sadly unlike sudoku, I haven't found a way how to cheat time.

Tick tock goes the clock

With that in mind, it's important the clock app gets it's fair share of testing! Nekhelesh has added some tests from the buglist, but some of the tests require further feature development. Since we can't stop time (well at least I can't!), it would be a great help to have someone come alongside these developers and add some testcases so they can focus on the application itself.

Consider helping the clock developers keep the clock regression free and well tested as it's features mature.  Grab the clock branchadd a testcase from the list of needsfollow the tutorial for help if needed, and propose a merge. Thanks for helping to ensure quality for ubuntu touch!

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