Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'autopilot'

Nicholas Skaggs

Coming off a lovely weekend, it's time we turned our attention to an app on the lighter side. Anyone up for a game of sudoku?


Sudoku is an example of a simple logic game that can be learned easily enough yet has the staying power to intrigue me to continue to play it. Dinko Osmankovic and the rest of the Sudoku Touch developers have created a version for ubuntu touch to fill those critical mundane moments of the day -- waiting for a train or having your morning coffee. Or perhaps if your like me, fighting insomnia (yikes!).

Apparently using the show hints button to play the entire game makes me a cheat.
So, while it seems the game is smart enough to slap me for trying to cheat my way through, it needs some testcases! Looking at the buglist, there are seven tasty bugs with your potential name on them. This is testing at it's finest! It's rare to count playing a game as helping ubuntu -- but in this case, you would be right!
Themes support!
Consider helping the sudoku touch developers as the game and it's features mature.  Grab the sudoku branch, add a testcase from the list of needs, follow the tutorial for help if needed, and propose a merge. Thanks for helping to ensure quality for ubuntu touch!

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Nicholas Skaggs

A good calendar is essential to me. I'm liable to forget almost everything about my day except eating :-) Things like day of the week and month are important details I definitely rely on a calendar for (I can usually get the month right!).

Fortunately for me (and you!), there is a core app that provides a handy Calendar. Michael Hall featured this application a few weeks ago on his blog covering a development rundown of the application. It covers the list of features nicely. In a word, there's a lot of neat stuff to test in there.

Looking at the buglist of needs there are only 2 showing in-progress -- plenty of room for someone to help out by testing each one of the different views. Monthly, daily, weekly; accessed via swiping.

" Swiping left and right on the month will take you back or forward a month at a time.  Swiping left or right on the bottom half will take you back and forward a day at a time.

Pull the event area down and let it go, and the month will collapse down into a single week. Now swiping left and right there will move you back and forward a week at a time.  Pull down and let it go again and it will snap back to showing the full month.
Finally, you have an option in the toolbar (swipe up from the bottom edge) to switch from an event list to a timeline view of your events."

Are you dizzy yet?

These seamless transitions could use some cool testcases! At the moment, the app is seeing it's first merge requests being made by Carla Sella and Kunal Parmar. The team has faced some issues with uncovering some unique requirements for autopilot, which have now been fixed. Excellent work both of you!

Consider helping Carla, Kunal and the ubuntu calendar developers as the application and it's features mature.  Grab the calendar branch, add a testcase from the list of needs, follow the tutorial for help if needed, and propose a merge. Thanks for helping be a part of ubuntu!


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Nicholas Skaggs

I couldn't help but start with one of the core apps I consider essential (to me anyway!) on my phone, a terminal. The terminal app being developed for ubuntu has some wonderful features built with a touch interface in mind. One of the biggest issues with touch is having a terminal ready keyboard with things like page up and down, arrow keys, and not to mention being able to use keyboard shortcuts like ctrl+d, ctrl+z, ctrl+c, etc. This has been handled rather elegantly with a long tap menu as you can see below, in addition to a panel that optionally appears at the top of the application.


Dmitry Zagnoyko has already landed a few tests for some of the features present, as you can see below. Execellent work Dmitry! A basic testcase exists now for each of the panels and the circle menu.



Help Dmitry and the terminal app team make sure all the features work properly for you upon release. Get involved and add a test. The initial setup work has already been done, and there are existing testcases already written. Grab the terminal branch, add a testcase from the list of needs, follow the tutorial for help if needed, and propose a merge.


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Nicholas Skaggs

As a quality community team, we've been continuing to make progress this cycle on automating our testcases, especially the new applications that are being written for ubuntu touch. These 'core apps' are being written by other community members for the next generation of ubuntu.

We're also making progress on our desktop applications and automating the ubiquity installer. With that in mind, I'm going to start a little blog series highlighting a package a day for automating. I'll dub it rather unoriginally "Testing All The Things". My goal is to showcase the wonderful work going on with testing this cycle in ubuntu, but also to encourage you dear reader to get involved in helping us. All areas of ubuntu (flavors too!) can benefit from some robot friends helping test the packages they work on and utilize.

But you don't need to wait to see your favorite app hit the list. Hit up the tutorials below for information to dive in and help us!


Core Apps Test Wiki
Writing an autopilot test for ubuntu sdk applications
QML Autopilot Tutorial with example application

Autopilot Tests Project
Writing an autopilot test for desktop applications 


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Nicholas Skaggs

Given all recent love and excitement for autopilot I wanted to share the QA community's progress on writing autopilot tests for, celebrate our successes and let everyone know where we still need help.

First let's talk about the ubuntu-autopilot-tests project. As part of the hackfests held at the end of May/early June we were able to complete the transition to autopilot 1.3 of the ubuntu desktop autopilot tests. Thanks to all of the contributors and hackers for helping on this! In addition, we now have a production branch, and the canonical platform QA team is working on adding them to the official smoke testing each day, Great work everyone! That said, tests are still needed, and in some cases the testcases are still basic and not covering many of the application features. There is still room for you to be invovled! Of note is the on-going work to automated our image testing via the UI.

Next, let's talk about the core apps. Last Thursday we held a hackfest to help kickstart testcases for all of these projects. So let's take a look at how far we've come in a week. As a reminder, testcase contributions to any of the core apps is very much appreciated -- there is still a need for you to come alongside and help write tests!

Calculator
There are already several testcases merged in with the main branch, but as one of the most feature complete applications, work and help is still needed in this area. There are currently 6 open bugs for tests needed here. This is a great application to contribute to for someone new to autopilot!

Calendar
There are two pending merge requests and the work is underway towards knocking out the rest of the testcases needed.

Clock/Alarm
The clock team has jumped in headfirst to help with testcases.  You can view the status of the remaining tests needed here.

Doc Viewer
I started on a branch for this and the basic infrastructure is in place. Branch the application. Grab a copy of the emulator, pick a bug and write your test. This app needs you!

File Manager
The first merge and test is in review. But there's still more tests to be written. Have a look at the list of needed tests.


RSS Reader
Ready and waiting! Check out the list of bugs and have at it! The basic structure is already in place. Simply grab a copy of the emulator, pick a bug and write your test. This app needs you!

Terminal
The first merge request has just been approved and landed for terminal autopilot tests. But there's more features to be tested in this awesome app. Grab something off the list and go. The setup work is already done.

Music
Ready and waiting! Check out the list of bugs and have at it! The basic structure is already in place. Simply grab a copy of the emulator, pick a bug and write your test. This app needs you!

Weather
Half of the initial testcases have been started and the first merges are being proposed. Rock on Martin!

Remember you can always view the big master list of all the open tests here. We've got a bit of work ahead of us! Be a part of the team. Grab an open bug from the list above or contact me for help and I'll make sure you get invovled!

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Nicholas Skaggs

A couple weeks ago we announced the initiative to drive up our autopilot (that is, automated) tests for our ubuntu touch core apps. The core apps are being made with the ubuntu sdk, and thus share the same language (QML) and toolkit (ubuntusdk).

With this in mind I wanted to provide an emulator, which in autopilot speak, is a utility class for writing autopilot tests that use the ubuntu SDK. The goal is to help accelerate the process for getting the testcases written, as well as standardizing best practices for testing common features. At the moment the emulator contains useful functions like tab switching, selecting from popovers, opening and closing the toolbar and clicking toolbar buttons. Please, take a look and utilize the emulator when you are contributing new tests for the ubuntu touch applications. For the moment, the emulator can be found here:

lp:~nskaggs/+junk/ubuntusdk_autopilot_emulator

The future home is hopefully in the SDK itself, but for now consider that branch your source for emulator goodness. Now, a quick FAQ.

Is it ready for use?
Yes, it's ready and tested on several core apps now including clock, calendar, terminal, and file manager. That said if you find an issue, simply contact me or propose an improvement!

How do I use it?
Inside your autopilot test subfolder, add an emulators folder if it's not already present. Next, branch my source above -- it will add ubuntusdk.py to the folder. Simply incorporate it into your __init__.py or testcase itself and call the utility functions with ubuntusdk.*. For an example check out the ubuntu-terminal-app and the merge request from today. It shows adding autopilot tests to an empty branch. In addition, the emulator (albeit an earlier version) was used in the tutorial on the ubuntu app developer portal.

Will it be updated?
Yes! Expect refinements and tweaks as we go along. Hopefully a true "stable and complete" version will appear in the not too distant feature when the emulator itself has a proper home. In the meantime, use it and as more complex tests are added, expect to update the emulator in the source branch you are working in.

Go forth and write tests!

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