Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'article'

Michael Hall

After many months of hard work, I’m very proud to be announcing a beta launch of the click packages software store, as part of the 2013 Ubuntu App Showdown Contest.

This beta is exclusively aimed at Ubuntu Touch apps that have been built using the Ubuntu SDK.

Once you upload your apps, they will go through a brief review and will be available on the latest image of Ubuntu Touch for download. Please take into account the current beta does not support selling apps yet, so you will only be able to upload free (as in speech) apps.

Keep in mind the store is currently under heavy development, so you might encounter bugs and workflow changes as we work through different issues.

If you have any questions about uploading click packages or bugs, please pop into our IRC channel, #ubuntu-app-devel.

Find out how to submit your Ubuntu Touch app here: http://developer.ubuntu.com/publish/

If you are interested in the development of the software store or the click format, all discussions are currently being held in a mailing list you are welcome to join, and the process so far has been pretty thoroughly documented in the wiki.

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Michael Hall

Today we are announcing our second Ubuntu App Showdown! Contestants will have six weeks to build and publish their apps using the new Ubuntu SDK and Ubuntu Touch platform. Both original apps and ported apps, native and HTML 5, will qualify for this competition.

phone-naturally-neat

The winners of this contest will each receive an LG Nexus 4 phone running Ubuntu Touch with their application pre-installed. Furthermore, each of the winners will have an opportunity to have their app included in the default Ubuntu install images for phones and tablets.

All valid entries will also become available for install on Ubuntu Touch devices from the Apps lens in the Dash, using the new Click packages and MyApps submission process.

Judges

The jury will be composed by a team of five judges:

  • Jono Bacon, Ubuntu Community Manager
  • Joey-Elijah Sneddon, writer and editor-in-chief of OMG!Ubuntu
  • Lisette Slegers, User Experience Designer at Canonical
  • Nekhelesh Ramananthan, Ubuntu Touch Core App developer
  • Bill Filler, Engineering Manager for the Phone & Tablet App Team

Review criteria

The jury will judge applications according to the following criteria:

  • General Interest – apps that are of more interest to general phone users will be scored higher. We recommend identifying what most phone users want to see, and identifying gaps that your app could fill.
  • Features – a wide range of useful and interesting features.
  • Quality – a high quality, stable, and bug-free application experience.
  • Design – your app should harness the Ubuntu Design Guidelines so it looks, feels, and operates like an Ubuntu app.
  • Awareness / Promotion – we will award extra points to those of you who blog, tweet, facebook, Google+, and otherwise share updates and information about your app as it progress.

If you are not a programmer and want to share some ideas for cool apps, be sure to add and vote apps on our reddit page.

How To Enter

The contest is free to enter and open to everyone.

The six week period starts on the Wed 7th August 2013!

Enter the Ubuntu App Showdown

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Anthony Lenton

Top 10 Ubuntu App Downloads for July

The productivity app, Spindl, debuts in the top 10 paid apps for July. While MC-Launcher was popular in July, it has been removed from the Software Center recently for unknown reasons. In the free apps category, three new apps make their debut. The game, Wakfu, comes in at number four in the list with two YouTube downloading tools, Minitube and All Video Downloader, coming in at #2 and #4.

Want to develop for the new Phone and Tablet OS, Ubuntu Touch? Be sure to check out the “Go Mobile” site for details.

Top 10 paid apps

  1. Filebot
  2. MC-Launcher
  3. Quick ‘n Easy Web Builder
  4. Fluendo DVD Player
  5. Spindl [NEW]
  6. UberWriter
  7. Bastion
  8. Drawers
  9. Braid
  10. Linux Format Magazine – Issue 173 [NEW]

Top 10 free apps

  1. Steam
  2. Minitube [NEW]
  3. Wakfu [NEW]
  4. All Video Downloader [NEW]
  5. Master PDF Editor
  6. Youtube to MP3
  7. CrossOver (Trial)
  8. Plex Media Server
  9. IntelliJ IDEA 12 Community Edition
  10. Motorbike

Would you like to see your app featured in this list and on millions of user’s computers? It’s a lot easier than you think:

Notes:

  • The lists of top 10 app downloads includes only those applications submitted through My Apps on the Ubuntu App Developer Site. For more information about of usage of other applications in the Ubuntu archive, check out the Ubuntu Popularity Contest statistics.
  • The top 10 free apps list contains gratis applications that are distributed under different types of licenses, some of which may not be open source. For detailed license information, please check each application’s description in the Ubuntu Software Center.

Follow Ubuntu App Development on:

Social Media Icons by Paul Robert Lloyd

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Steve George

Today we are pleased to announce the beta release of the Ubuntu SDK! The SDK is the toolkit that will power Ubuntu’s convergence revolution, giving you one platform and one API for all Ubuntu form factors. This lets you write your app one time, in one way, and it will work everywhere.  You can read the full Ubuntu SDK Beta announcement here.

For the developers who are already writing apps using the Ubuntu SDK most of the beta’s features will already be known, as they have been landing in the daily releases as they become finished. Here’s a list of the features that have been added since the alpha:

  • Cordova Ubuntu HTML5 app template – leverage the Apache Cordova APIs to write Ubuntu apps with web technologies: HTML, JavaScript and CSS. Write your first HTML5 with the Cordova Ubuntu tutorial.
  • Ubuntu SDK HTML5 theme – a companion to all HTML5 apps: stylesheets and JavaScript code to provide the same look and feel as native apps
  • Responsive layout – applications can now adopt a more natural layout depending on form factor (phone, tablet, desktop) and orientation
  • Scope template – Scopes enable operators to prioritise their content, to achieve differentiation without fragmentation. Now easier to create with a code template
  • Click packaging preview – initial implementation of the Click technology to distribute applications. Package your apps with Click at the press of a button
  • Theme engine improvements – a reworked theme engine to make it easier and more flexible to customise the look and feel of your app
  • Unified Actions API – define actions to be used across different Ubuntu technologies: the HUD, App Indicators, the Launcher, the Messaging Menu
  • U1DB integration – the SDK now provides a database API to easily synchronise documents between devices, using the Ubuntu One cloud

Some of the biggest news here is the Cordova support and HTML5 theme, which brings together our goal of making first class HTML5 app that look and feel like native apps.  Cordova support means that apps written using the PhoneGap framework can be easily ported to Ubuntu Touch, and the HTML5 themes, written largely by community developer Adnane Belmadiaf, will allow those apps to match the native SDK components in both the way they look as well as the way the user interacts with them.

The Responsive Layouts, which landed in the daily SDK packages weeks go, gives developers the ability to adjust their application’s GUI dynamically at runtime, depending on the amount of screen space available or any number of other variables.  This is one key to making convergent apps that can adapt to be useful on both small touch screens and large monitors with a keyboard and mouse.

We’ve also put out the first set of Click packaging tools, which will provide an easier way for developers to package and distribute their applications both on their own and through the Ubuntu Software Center.  There is still a lot more work to do before all of the Click infrastructure is in place, but for now developers can start trying getting a feel for it.

All of that and more is now available, so grab the latest SDK packages, read the QML and HTML5 app development tutorials, and get a head start building your convergent Ubuntu application today!

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Steve George

Ubuntu Edge

Today we took the wraps off a campaign to build the world’s first truly convergent Superphone: the Ubuntu Edge.  With top of the line hardware running Ubuntu software, the Ubuntu Edge will dual boot Ubuntu Touch as well as Ubuntu for Android, and will run the full Ubuntu desktop when docked to an external keyboard, monitor and mouse.

We have started a community funding campaign to raise the cost of building these phones.  Reserve your Ubuntu Edge today as the discounted price of only $600 USD (£394) today!  After 4pm BST on Tuesday July 23rd the price for the device will go up to $830, so don’t wait.

Community Funded

Like Ubuntu itself, the creation of the Ubuntu Edge phone is a community endeavor, which is why we’re using an Indie GoGo campaign to raise the cost of building these devices.  All of the money raised will go towards manufacturing and delivering the phone to the people who contribute.  That means you get the phone basically at the cost of manufacturing it (or less if you contribute $600 in the first 24 hours of the campaign).

Crowd funding plays two important roles for Ubuntu Edge.  First and most obviously it will cover the expense of this manufacturing run.  But more importantly it will also show other manufacturers and carriers that there is a great demand not just for Ubuntu phones, but fully convergent Superphones.  Even if you are unable to contribute enough to get a phone, your smaller donation to the campaign will still advance that second goal of spreading awareness.

The money collected in this campaign will not be used to fund Canonical’s normal business activity, it will all go towards manufacturing a limited number these high-end Ubuntu Edge devices.  Nor will Canonical be turning into a hardware company, we are still actively engaged with OEMs who are interested in building their own Ubuntu powered phones, and this campaign does not change those relationships at all.  This campaign is solely for the purpose of developing a limited number of ultra-high-end convergent devices to kick off a new generation of mobile phones based on Ubuntu’s convergent technologies.

Technical Details

The Ubuntu Edge will not be just another phone, it will be the first in a new breed of convergent superphones.  Being able to run a full productive desktop environment from a device that fits into your pocket is no small feat, and to do that we will use the very best hardware available, making Ubuntu Edge a top-of-the-line device not only now and when it will ship in May 2014, but for quite some time after as well.

  • Dual-boot Ubuntu Edge into either Ubuntu or Android
  • Becomes a fully integrated Ubuntu desktop PC when docked
  • Fast and powerful device with multi-core CPU and at least 4GB RAM
  • 128GB of storage for photos, music, content
  • 4.5in 1,280 x 720 HD display with pure sapphire crystal screen, the hardest natural substance after diamond
  • Cameras made for low-light, fast response and close up pictures: 8mp rear camera, 2mp front
  • Faster connection all over the world with dual-LTE, dual-band 802.11n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4, NFC
  • Connect to HDMI TVs and monitors easily with MHL connector, 3.5mm jack
  • GPS, accelerometer, gyro, proximity sensor, compass, barometer
  • Stereo speakers with HD audio, dual-mic recording, Active Noise Cancellation
  • Silicon-anode Li-Ion battery
  • 64 x 9 x 124mm.

With a quad-core processor, 4GB of RAM and 128GB of storage, this little device will be capable of satisfying most desktop computing needs.  It’s sapphire crystal glass is virtually unscratchable, so you’ll have a perfect, clear display for the lifetime of the phone.  Even the battery will be using the revolutionary silicon-anode technology that will provide higher energy density and faster charging.

For App Developers

When designing the Ubuntu Edge, we didn’t just pick the biggest and best technologies, we also thought about how to make it better for Ubuntu Touch and apps written with the Ubuntu SDK.  Using that as a guide, the size and physical design of Ubuntu Edge are built to complement the edge-swipe gestures that are unique to Ubuntu Touch.  You can easily access all 4 edges of the screen while holding the phone in one hand, giving users an unobstructed view of your entire app while still putting controls in easy reach.  Ubuntu Edge will give your app the best user experience of any device currently on the market.

Get yours now!

There will only be a limited number of Ubuntu Edge devices made, once this campaign ends so does your chance to get one for yourself!  Since we announced our plans to enter the mobile phone market with Ubuntu we have been asked where people can buy one, so now you have your chance.  And if you contribute within the first 24 hours you can get your Ubuntu Edge phone at a huge discount! Go to our campaign page and make your donation today!

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Anthony Lenton

Top 10 Ubuntu App Downloads for June

Top 10 Ubuntu Apps

Filebot takes over the top spot for June as the North American summer heats up while Quick ‘n Easy Web Builder moves into the #2 spot. Not much change in the Free Top 10. Steam continues it’s reign at the top.

Want to develop for the new Phone and Tablet OS, Ubuntu Touch? Be sure to check out the “Go Mobile” site for details.

Top 10 paid apps

  1. Filebot
  2. Quick ‘n Easy Web Builder
  3. Fluendo DVD Player
  4. Mini Minecraft Launcher
  5. MC-Launcher
  6. Braid
  7. UberWriter
  8. Drawers
  9. HDD Ranger
  10. Robotux

Top 10 free apps

  1. Steam
  2. Motorbike
  3. Master PDF Editor
  4. Youtube to MP3
  5. Plex Media Server
  6. Screencloud
  7. CrossOver (Trial)
  8. IntelliJ IDEA 12 Community Edition
  9. Nitro
  10. Splashtop Streamer for Ubuntu Linux

Would you like to see your app featured in this list and on millions of user’s computers? It’s a lot easier than you think:

Notes:

  • The lists of top 10 app downloads includes only those applications submitted through My Apps on the Ubuntu App Developer Site. For more information about of usage of other applications in the Ubuntu archive, check out the Ubuntu Popularity Contest statistics.
  • The top 10 free apps list contains gratis applications that are distributed under different types of licenses, some of which may not be open source. For detailed license information, please check each application’s description in the Ubuntu Software Center.

Follow Ubuntu App Development on:

Social Media Icons by Paul Robert Lloyd

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David Planella

Participate in the Ubuntu Core Apps Hack Days and get involved in developing the essential apps of Ubuntu on phones.

Starting this Wednesday, and during the next three weeks, we’re organizing a set of Hack Days inviting all interested contributors to bring Ubuntu Touch up another step closer to a production release and to ensure all core apps have reached a state of functionality to be used every day.

With the Core Apps Hack Days we’re targeting several objectives:

  • Get all core apps into a ‘dogfoodable’ state
  • Find and fix critical bugs in core apps and their dependencies
  • Identify, record and fix gaps in functionality
  • Get new developers involved in Core Apps and Ubuntu Touch development in general
  • Have fun with Ubuntu App Development!

How the Hack Days will work

  • The Ubuntu Core Apps Hack Days will be run as virtual hackfests on the #ubuntu-app-devel IRC channel on Freenode
  • Everyone is free to join the channel and encouraged to pick a task related to the set of goals to get core apps to a dogfoodable state
  • The development and testing tasks will be posted on the Hack Days wiki before each day’s hackfest starts
  • Ask Michael Hall (mhall119), David Planella (dpm) or Alan Pope (popey) on the channel for any help when you join (or just say hi!)

When

  • Starting on Wednesday 10th of July until Thursday 25th of July
  • From 9:00 UTC to 21:00 UTC
  • We’ll be following this schedule:
10 July Calendar
11 July Music
12 July Clock
15 July Calculator
16 July Weather
17 July Sudoku Touch
18 July RSS Reader
19 July File Manager
22 July Document Viewer
23 July Terminal
24 July Dropping Letters
25 July Stock Ticker

Join us!

Participating in the Hack Days is extremely easy: you just need a working Internet connection and access to IRC. We simply recommend some preparation beforehand:

  1. Learn how to get started developing core apps
  2. Join the #ubuntu-app-devel IRC channel on Freenode

Looking forward to seeing you next Wednesday at the Calendar hackfest!

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Chris Jones

Help shaping up Ubuntu Touch by joining the core apps development teams

Community-driven apps that will power the next million phones

The Ubuntu Core Apps project started as an initiative born out of the initial Ubuntu Touch announcement, with a call to our community to participate in building the core set of applications which will be considered for shipping on Ubuntu phones.

With this, we started an exciting project that provides a unique opportunity for community members to create Free Software that could run on millions of handsets.

If you’re running Ubuntu Touch on a device, you can already see the results of the work our amazing volunteer developers have been doing: Calculator, Clock, Calendar, Weather, Terminal, File Manager… these apps and more are part of this project. Together with the Canonical designers and other community designers, we’ve also got a solid UX and design story for our applications.

In essence, each core app development team organizes their work and time in the way that works best for them, where the Canonical Community, Design and Engineering teams participate in several different areas:

  • Development infrastructure
  • Engineering management
  • Community mentorship and support
  • Design guidance

With this post I’d like to share how any developer can contribute to core apps and join the core dev teams. It’s not only an opportunity to shape up Ubuntu Touch, but also to work in a truly open development environment, with the best Open Source developers and designers out there!

Participating in the core apps project

Getting started to contributing to core apps is just a few minutes away. Here are some really easy steps for developers to get all set up.

Step 1: install all core apps

While some of the apps are already installed on the Ubuntu Touch image, you’ll be doing your development on the desktop. As part of the convergency story, core apps run equally well on phones, tablets or desktops, so the first step will be to get familiar with them and do some dogfooding.

  1. Open a terminal by pressing Ctrl+t and type the commands below, followed by Enter.
  2. Install the Ubuntu SDK: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:canonical-qt5-edgers/qt5-proper && sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-sdk-team/ppa && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install ubuntu-sdk
  3. Install the core apps: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-touch-coreapps-drivers/daily && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install touch-coreapps

If you get stuck here, check out the SDK’s getting started page or ask on Ask Ubuntu

At this point you’ll be able to launch any of the core apps from the Dash.

  • Try opening the Dash clicking on the Ubuntu button in the Launcher, and type the first letters of each one of the apps to launch them. You should now be able to install:
    1. Calculator
    2. Calendar
    3. Clock
    4. Document viewer
    5. Dropping Letters
    6. Email
    7. File Manager
    8. Music
    9. RSS Reader
    10. Stock Ticker
    11. Sudoku
    12. Terminal
    13. Weather

Step 2: pick an app and find something to work on

Once you’ve road-tested all of the apps, you’ll have a good overview of their functionality, and where you think you can help. At this point, the best thing to do is to pick an app you’re interested in contributing to and find more about it:

  1. Go to the core apps overview page
  2. Click on the app you’re interested in. This will show you:
    • The public project where the app is being developed and where the code is hosted
    • The development team who is writing the app
    • The IRC channel where to discuss about the app’s development in real time
    • The blueprint we use to track the items to work on to implement the functional requirements
    • The burn-down chart we use to provide an overview of the status of the work

The best way to get started is to look at the existing code for the app. Here’s how:

  1. If you haven’t already, open a terminal with Ctrl+t and type this command to install the Bazaar revision control system: sudo apt-get install bzr
  2. Get a local copy of the code. Run this command, replacing ubuntu-clock-app by the app you’ve chosen. You’ll find the exact name to replace on the project section of the app’s detail page you opened earlier on: bzr branch lp:ubuntu-clock-app
  3. Start Qt Creator, the Ubuntu’s SDK IDE by clicking the Ubuntu button on the Launcher and typing “ubuntu sdk”
  4. In Qt Creator, press Ctrl+o to navigate to the location where you’ve just downloaded the code to and choose the .qmlproject file to open the app’s project in the IDE
  5. You can now study the code and launch it with either the Ctrl+r key combination or by pressing the big green “Run” button in Qt Creator

Before you start doing any changes in the code, you might want to get in touch with us to ensure no one is already working on what you’re intending to start on. Two good places to look at are:

Step 3: send a merge proposal with your contribution

In our distributed collaborative environment, where thousands of volunteers participate in Ubuntu from all over the world, we use a distributed version control system, Bazaar to manage the code’s revisions.  The code for all core apps is hosted in public projects in Launchpad, the online tool where we do all development.

You can easily do your changes to the code locally, publish them in a public branch and then send a request for the core app development teams to review and merge your code.

Check out the core apps development guide for the full details ›

Many ways to contribute

Although development is where you can make most of an impact at this point, there are many other ways to participate. You can:

Get in touch

We’d like to hear from you!. If you’ve got QML programming skills and would be interested in joining one of the core apps teams, get in touch with Michael Hall, David Planella or Alan Pope and we’ll gladly guide you in the first steps to becoming a core app dev.

You can also join any of the public IRC core app development meetings.

Looking forward to welcoming you in the core apps project!

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Chris Jones

One of the key aspects in developing the Ubuntu Touch core apps has been Quality Assurance. With that goal in mind, we’ve been adding functional tests to each and every one of the applications, using Autopilot.

We want to ensure our core apps are rock-solid, and we’d like to invite each of you who want to help make it happen to participate in the Autopilot Hackfest today. Here’s how:

  1. Join the #ubuntu-quality IRC channel ›
  2. Read the Autopilot tutorial ›
  3. Read Nick Skagg’s blog post for more details ›

Looking forward to the new autopilot tests for core apps. See you there!

Image: Autopilot Engaged CC-BY-SA by Mike Miley

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David Planella

Time does fly, and we’re alread on the last day of the Ubuntu Developer Summit. Lots of content covered and still lots of interesting discussions to be had. We’re thrilled to bring you the summary on what’s on today on the App Development track.

Here’s the list of app development sessions for today at UDS:

Hope to see you there!

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David Planella

After a very productive kick off, we’re back with the second day of the Ubuntu Developer Summit on the App Development track and the summary of sessions for today. Thank you everyone who participated in the sessions yesterday, either in hangouts or in IRC.

Here’s the list of app development sessions for today:

See you there!

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David Planella

UDS, the Ubuntu Developer Summit, is here again, starting in just a few hours. A week packed with content that will define the plans for the new Ubuntu development cycle, and as usual, a with a full track dedicated to application development.

So for all of you interested in helping and being part of the effort of making Ubuntu a platform of choice for application developers, here’s a quick list with an overview of the sessions we’ve got in store for today.

The links in the list below will take you to the each session, ready to participate on the live hangout or on IRC. You can also check out the full UDS schedule.

So, without further ado, here’s the list of app development sessions for today:

Looking forward to seeing you there!

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John Pugh

That time has once again arrived…the Top 10 for April. Stormcloud continues to reign the top with Fluendo DVD moving into the second spot in paid applications. The Top 10 Free apps has not changed much from last month with Steam continuing to dominate the Free Top 10.

Want to develop for the new Phone and Tablet OS, Ubuntu Touch? Be sure to check out the “Go Mobile” site for details.

Top 10 paid apps

  1. Stormcloud
  2. Fluendo DVD Player
  3. War in a Box – Paper Tanks
  4. Splice [NEW]
  5. Filebot
  6. UberWriter [NEW]
  7. Quick ‘n Easy Web Builder
  8. Braid
  9. Drawers
  10. Bastion

Top 10 free apps

  1. Steam
  2. Master PDF Editor
  3. Youtube to MP3
  4. Nitro
  5. Plex Media Server
  6. CrossOver (Trial)
  7. Motorbike
  8. IntelliJ IDEA 12 Community Edition
  9. flareGet
  10. Splashtop Streamer

Would you like to see your app featured in this list and on millions of user’s computers? It’s a lot easier than you think:

Notes:

  • The lists of top 10 app downloads includes only those applications submitted through My Apps on the Ubuntu App Developer Site. For more information about of usage of other applications in the Ubuntu archive, check out the Ubuntu Popularity Contest statistics.
  • The top 10 free apps list contains gratis applications that are distributed under different types of licenses, some of which may not be open source. For detailed license information, please check each application’s description in the Ubuntu Software Center.

Follow Ubuntu App Development on:

Social Media Icons by Paul Robert Lloyd

Read more
John Pugh


Hot on the heels of the Game Developer’s Conference in San Francisco we bring you the Top 10 Ubuntu App downloads for March 2013.
Stormcloud continues its rule at the top of the charts and the “far out” puzzle game, Machinarium is right behind it at #2. No surprise that Steam continues to dominate the top Free chart.
We saw some really cool technology at the Game Developer’s Conference, met some super nice people, and demonstrated the Ubuntu Phone and Tablet to a ton of people at the show.

Top 10 paid apps

  1. Stormcloud
  2. Machinarium
  3. Fluendo DVD Player
  4. War in a Box – Paper Tanks [NEW]
  5. Filebot
  6. Quick ‘n Easy Web Builder
  7. Braid
  8. Legend of Grimrock
  9. Mini Minecraft Launcher
  10. Linux Tycoon [NEW]

Top 10 free apps

  1. Steam
  2. Master PDF Editor
  3. Youtube to MP3
  4. Splashtop Streamer
  5. Plex Media Server
  6. Motorbike
  7. CrossOver (Trial)
  8. Nitro
  9. flareGet
  10. IntelliJ IDEA 12 Community Edition

Would you like to see your app featured in this list and on millions of user’s computers? It’s a lot easier than you think:

Notes:

  • The lists of top 10 app downloads includes only those applications submitted through My Apps on the Ubuntu App Developer Site. For more information about of usage of other applications in the Ubuntu archive, check out the Ubuntu Popularity Contest statistics.
  • The top 10 free apps list contains gratis applications that are distributed under different types of licenses, some of which may not be open source. For detailed license information, please check each application’s description in the Ubuntu Software Center.

Follow Ubuntu App Development on:

Social Media Icons by Paul Robert Lloyd

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John Pugh

Canonical is again attending the Game Developer Conference in San Francisco. This year we will be in the ever popular Unity Partner Pavilion located in the South Hall #1002. The show floor is open from Wednesday to Friday March 27 – 29.

Stop by our kiosk for a demonstration of the Unity3d export for Ubuntu and see how easy it is to submit games to the Ubuntu Software Center via our App Developer Program.  Let us show you the benefits of Ubuntu, the painless submission process, and how we can help you access millions of Ubuntu users. We will have Ubuntu running on phones and tablets so you can touch the future of Ubuntu on mobile.

You will not want to miss a talk about monetising games and how to go mobile on the Ubuntu platform to be presented Wednesday, 27 March at 1:55 p.m. in the Unity Booth Theater on the exhibit floor in the South Hall.

Follow us on Twitter, Facebook or on G+ for updates while we are there.

See you at the Game Developer’s Conference!

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Daniel Holbach

Hot on the heels of the announcements of the Ubuntu SDK and the Touch Developer Preview, we bring you the first ever Ubuntu SDK Days.

Make apps happen on all of these devices

On Thursday, 14th March and Friday, 15th March a number of app developers and Ubuntu SDK creators will get you started writing apps for Ubuntu on multiple devices. It’s surprisingly simple, and since the announcement we’ve seen many early adopters try out the SDK and the first apps up and running. We will  answer your questions, talk about best practises and show you the power of the SDK.

Here a quick overview over the sessions we’ll run:

  • Installing and Configuring the SDK
  • Writing your first app with the SDK
  • Writing games with QML and Javascript
  • Live update from the development progress of the Touch Core Apps
  • Several Q&A sessions
  • Making the best of the Ubuntu App Design guidelines
  • More about the SDK skunkworks projects
  • Introducing Friends and Gwibber QML
  • Writing a new generation of Scopes
  • Lightning talks and Project demos

How to join

Participating is easy: just head to http://ubuntuonair.com to watch the sessions on the schedule. Videos will be available after the event, to ensure you can watch the content even if you couldn’t make it to the session you wanted.

You can ask your questions on the chat widget on http://ubuntuonair.com or join the #ubuntu-app-devel IRC channel on Freenode directly.

Check out https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuSDKDays/ to see the timetable of the event, be there for lots of fun and bring your friends – and your questions too!

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John Pugh


Another month in the books and this time we’re on time giving you the top 10 for February 2013. Stormcloud still rules the top spot and Machinarium is back in the charts at #2 with its far out puzzle game. Steam steamed its way to the top in the free category after it’s debut in late February.
Come see us at GDC ’13 in the Unity Technologies pavilion and we’ll show you how to make money on your app in Ubuntu quick! Stop by, say hi and check out the latest Ubuntu Touch devices, too.

Top 10 paid apps

  1. Stormcloud
  2. Machinarium
  3. Braid
  4. Fluendo DVD Player
  5. Quick ‘n Easy Web Builder
  6. Legend of Grimrock
  7. Bastion
  8. RC Mini Racers
  9. Drawers
  10. Filebot [NEW]

Top 10 free apps

  1. Steam [NEW]
  2. Youtube to MP3 [NEW]
  3. Motorbike [NEW]
  4. Plex Media Server
  5. Splashtop Streamer
  6. Command & Conquer: Tiberium Alliances
  7. Lord of Ultima
  8. CrossOver (Trial)
  9. Master PDF Editor
  10. Nitro

Would you like to see your app featured in this list and on millions of user’s computers? It’s a lot easier than you think:

Notes:

  • The lists of top 10 app downloads includes only those applications submitted through My Apps on the Ubuntu App Developer Site. For more information about of usage of other applications in the Ubuntu archive, check out the Ubuntu Popularity Contest statistics.
  • The top 10 free apps list contains gratis applications that are distributed under different types of licence, some of which may not be open source. For detailed licence information, please check each application’s description in the Ubuntu Software Centre.

Follow Ubuntu App Development on:

Social Media Icons by Paul Robert Lloyd

Read more
Daniel Holbach

Yesterday we released Ubuntu Touch Preview images for four devices. This is a huge milestone for Ubuntu. We always wanted Ubuntu to be everywhere and the Preview shows quite nicely how well the vision of a design family across different form factors works.

There is quite a bit of work to be done, we all know that, but it’s a giant opportunity for us, the Ubuntu community. Everybody can contribute to the effort and we can show the world how we believe software should look like.

How you can help? Easy.

  • You can install the Ubuntu Touch preview images on a device and test them.
  • You can help out designing and shaping the Ubuntu Touch Core Apps.
  • If you are a bit more experienced with bringing software up on new devices, you can help us porting Ubuntu Touch to new devices.

Did the last point find your interest? Excellent, because we just took the wraps of our Ubuntu Touch Porting guide. This also marks the start of our Ubuntu Touch Port-a-thon. We want to get Ubuntu Touch up and running on as many devices as possible.

If you don’t mind some tinkering, maybe some kernel building, some configuration meddling and flashing your device repeatedly, you might just the person we’re looking for.

The porting guide should help you understand

  • how Ubuntu Touch works internally,
  • which bits are generally involved and where to find them
  • how to submit patches
  • how images are put together
  • how to test them and
  • where to find help

To get you started and into the mood, you might want to join us today, at Friday 22nd February at 15:00 UTC on http://ubuntuonair.com when two super heroes of the Ubuntu Touch project, namely Ricardo Salveti and Sergio Schvezov, are going to talk to us about the technical aspects of the phone and the tablet.

Reliable sources tell us, there’s going to be a surprise announce during the hangout as well.

This is the opportunity we always wanted. Let’s make it happen. Bring Ubuntu to the world in all its beauty.

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David Planella

We’re thrilled to announce yet another significant milestone in the history of the Ubuntu project. After having recently unveiled the Ubuntu Touch Developer Preview, today we’re publishing the full source code and images for supported devices.

For developers and enthusiasts only

While a huge amount of Engineering and Design work has been put into ensuring that the foundations for our user experience vision are in place, we want to stress that the Ubuntu Touch Developer Preview is currently work in progress. We are releasing the full code at this point to align to our philosophy of transparency and open source development.

We recommend to install the Touch Developer Preview only if you are a developer or enthusiast who wants to test or contribute to the platform. It is not intended to replace production devices or the tablet or handset you use every day.

Flash your device

All that said, let’s get on to how to install Touch Developer Preview from a public image on your device.

What to expect after flashing

Not all functionality from a production device is yet available on the Touch Preview. The list of functions you can expect after installing the preview on your handset or tablet are as follows. For detailed information check the release notes.

  • Shell and core applications
  • Connection to the GSM network (on Galaxy Nexus and Nexus 4)
  • Phone calls and SMS (on Galaxy Nexus and Nexus 4)
  • Networking via Wifi
  • Functional camera (front and back)
  • Device connectivity through the Android Developer Bridge tool (adb)

Supported devices

The images we are making available today support the following devices:

  • Galaxy Nexus
  • Nexus 4
  • Nexus 7
  • Nexus 10

I’m all set, show me how to flash!

You will find the detailed instructions to flash on the Ubuntu wiki.

Install the Touch Developer Preview >

Contributing and the road ahead

These are exciting times for Ubuntu. We’re building the technology of the future, this time aiming at a whole new level of massive adoption. The Touch Developer Preview means the first fully open source mobile OS developed also in the open. True to our principles this milestone also enables our community of developers to contribute and be a key part of this exciting journey.

In terms of the next steps, today we’re making the preview images available for the Ubuntu 12.10 stable release. In the next few days we’re going to switch to Raring Ringtail, our development release, which is where development will happen on the road to our convergence story.

You’ll find the full details of how the infrastructure and the code are being published and used on the Ubuntu wiki.

Contribute to the Touch Developer Preview >

Presenting the Ubuntu SDK Alpha

But there’s more! To further celebrate the Touch Preview, we’re very proud to bring some exciting news that app developers will surely enjoy: the Ubuntu SDK Alpha release.

In fact, development of the SDK still keeps happening in the open and on a rolling release basis. But coinciding with the Touch Developer Preview, we thought that the latest release came with so much goodness, that we decided to label it in celebration.

Feature highlight: remote app deployment

Perhaps the coolest feature ever since the SDK was released: you can now deploy and execute the apps you create straight from the IDE.

Applications developed with Qt Creator can now be seamlessly and securely transferred and executed to a device just moving two fingers. Remember this shortcut: Ctrl+F12.

Inline with how easy and lightweight the process of creating a phone app is, a lot of work has been put into ensuring all complexity is hidden from the developer, yet it works solidly. Behind the scenes, SSH key pairing with the remote device works on-the-fly.

Here’s the lowdown:

  1. Plug in your mobile device running Ubuntu on the USB port of your computer
  2. Make sure your device is also connected to a wireless network (SSH key pairing happens over the air)
  3. Start Qt Creator from the Dash, and select the new Devices tab
  4. Press the Enable button to activate Developer Mode
  5. Once the device is connected, you can develop your QML projects as usual (check out the new project wizard as well) and press Ctrl+F12 to install and execute your app on the remote device

Tooling updates

With Qt Creator at its heart, the set of tools app developers use on an everyday basis to author their software, have seen major improvements:

  • Qt Creator has been updated to the bleeding edge version: 2.7. We expect this version to continue maturing together with the platform and the SDK.
  • Ubuntu application templates and wizard are now available to easily start creating apps that run on the phone and tablets.
  • The visual user interface designer in Qt Creator now works with QtQuick 2, the framework upon the Ubuntu SDK is based.

User Interface Toolkit updates

The UI Toolkit is the part of the SDK that provides the graphical components (such as buttons, text entries, and others) as building blocks that enable the basic user interaction with the underlying system. A new component, polishing and bug fixing have set the theme for this release:

Install the Ubuntu SDK Alpha

By now we’re pretty certain you’re looking forward to installing and putting all of that development goodness to the test.

That’s an easy one, if you haven’t yet install the Ubuntu SDK.

If you already installed the SDK, just run Update Manager from the Dash and update the Ubuntu SDK package as prompted. Or alternatively, if you prefer the command line, just fire up a terminal and run ‘sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install ubuntu-sdk’.

And that’s pretty much it! Be sure to check out the release notes for any additional technical details too.

Let us know what you think

We’d be delighted to hear what you think and get your feedback on how you are using the SDK and ways in which it could be improved. So do get in touch with us or report a bug if you find any issues.

Time to start developing beautiful apps now!

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David Planella

We’re thrilled to announce one of the most expected resources for Ubuntu app developers: the App Design Guides.

The App Design Guides site is the first installment of a live resource that will organically grow to provide guidance and enable app developers to build stunning, consistent and usable applications on a diversity of Ubuntu devices.

Together with the Ubuntu SDK preview, the App Design Guides complete yet another chapter in the Ubuntu app developer story. Developers have now the tools to create beautiful software, along with all the information related to UX, behaviour, patterns and visual design to ensure their apps provide a solid, clean and enjoyable user experience.

And consistent with the Ubuntu philosophy and our beliefs, all of these tools and guides are available to everyone as open source and for free.

Show me the Ubuntu App Design Guides! ›

Updating the core app designs for Ubuntu App Guides compliance

We have recently kicked off a community-driven process to design and implement a set of 12 core apps for Ubuntu running on phones. The first stage of the project consisted in asking community members to participate in the submission of designs to be used as input and food for thought for the core app developers.

The response so far has been overwelming:  over 50 community designers signed up for this initiative, submitting nearly 90 mockups on the Ubuntu MyBalsamiq site we set up for this project.

Following the App Design Guides go-live, it is now a great opportunity to ensure those designs follow the guidelines for a consistent app experience on Ubuntu. Therefore, we’d like to ask everyone who submitted a design to review them and update them to make sure they are inline with the App Design Guides.

Reminder: if you want to collaborate in this design project, just drop an e-mail to David Planella <david(dot)planella(at)canonical(dot)com> and Michael Hall <michael(dot)hall(at)canonical(dot)com>.

Open design and collaboration

Continuing with the trend of open and collaborative design, we want to hear from you!

The Guides are a resource that will grow together with the needs of app developers, so we’ll greatly appreciate your feedback on the Ubuntu Phone mailing list (remember to prepend the subject with [Design]) and if you’ve got any questions about them, just ask on Ask Ubuntu.

Stay tuned for updates and for some visual designs for core apps from the Canonical Design team coming soon!

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