Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'apps'

Daniel Holbach

Shortly before the submission deadline last night we had some small technical hiccups in the Ubuntu Software Store. This was fixed resolved very quickly (thanks a lot everyone who worked on this!), but we decided to give everyone another day to make up for it.

The new deadline is today, 10th April 2014, 23:59 UTC.

Please all verify that your app still works, everythings is tidy, you submitted it to the store and filled out the submission form correctly. Here’s how.

Submit your app

This is obviously the most important bit and needs to happen first. Don’t leave this to the last minute. Your app might have to go through a couple of reviews before it’s accepted in the store. So plan in some time for that. Once it’s accepted and published in the store, you can always, much more quickly, publish an update.

Submit your app.

Register your participation

Once your app is in the store, you need to register your participation in the App Showdown. To make sure your application is registered for the contest and judges review it, you’ll need to fill in the participation form. You can start filling it in already and until the submission deadline, it should only take you 2 minutes to complete.

Fill out the submission form.

Questions?

If you have questions or need help, reach out (also rather sooner than later) to our great community of Ubuntu App Developers.

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Daniel Holbach

image-app-showdown

Here’s the final reminder. The App Showdown is almost over and you can win some beautiful devices if you get your app in tomorrow, Wednesday, April 9th 2014 (23:59 UTC).

Getting your app in is very easy: just follow these two steps.

Submit your app

This is obviously the most important bit and needs to happen first. Don’t leave this to the last minute. Your app might have to go through a couple of reviews before it’s accepted in the store. So plan in some time for that. Once it’s accepted and published in the store, you can always, much more quickly, publish an update.

Submit your app.

Register your participation

Once your app is in the store, you need to register your participation in the App Showdown. To make sure your application is registered for the contest and judges review it, you’ll need to fill in the participation form. You can start filling it in already and until the submission deadline, it should only take you 2 minutes to complete.

Fill out the submission form.

Questions?

If you have questions or need help, reach out (also rather sooner than later) to our great community of Ubuntu App Developers.

Good luck everyone, we’re looking forward to lots and lots of great apps! :-)

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James Westby

We’ve recently rolled out some changes to the submission process for Click Applications that should make it easier for you to submit new applications, and allow them to be approved more quickly.

Previously when submitting an application you would have to enter all the information about that application on the website, even when some of that information was already included in the package itself. This was firstly an irritation, but sometimes developers would make a mistake when re-entering this information, meaning that the app was rejected from review and they would have to go back and correct the mistake.

With the new changes, when you submit an application you will wait a few seconds while the package is examined by the system, and you will then be redirected to the same process as before. However this time some of the fields will be pre-filled with information from the package. You won’t have to type in the application name, as it will already be there. This will speed up the process, and should reduce the number of mistakes that happen at that stage.

We’ve also been working on a command-line interface for submitting applications. It’s not polished yet, but if you are intrepid you can try out click-toolbelt.

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Michael Hall

Convergent File ManagerConvergence is going to be a major theme for Ubuntu 14.04, not just at the OS and Unity 8 levels, but also for the apps that run on it. The Core Apps, those apps that were developed by the community and included by default in the last release, are no exception to this. We want to make sure they all converge neatly and usefully on both a tablet and on the desktop. So once again we are asking for community design input, this time to take the existing application interfaces and extend them to new form factors.

How to submit your designs

We have detailed the kind of features we want to see for each of the Core Apps on a Convergence wiki page. If you have a convergence design idea you would like to submit, send it as a file attachment or link to it online in an email to design@canonical.com along with any additional notes, descriptions, or user stories.  The design team will be reviewing the submitted designs live on their bi-weekly Design Clinics (Dec 4th and Dec 18th) at 1400 UTC.  But before you submit your ideas, keep reading to see what they should include.

Extend what’s there

We don’t want to add too many features this cycle, there’s going to be enough work to do just building the convergence into the app.  Use the existing features and designs as your starting point, and re-imagine those same features and designs on a tablet or desktop.  Design new features or modify existing ones when it makes the experience better on a different form factor, but remember that we want the user to experience it as the same application across the board, so try and keep the differences to a minimum.

Form follows function

There’s more to a good design than just a good looking UI, especially when designing convergence.  Make sure that you take the user’s activity into account, plan out how they will access the different features of the app, make sure it’s both intuitive and simple.  The more detail you put into this the more likely you are to discover possible problems with your designs, or come up with better solutions that you had originally intended.

Think outside the screen

There is more to convergence that just a different screen size, and your designs should take that into consideration.  While it’s important to make good use of the added space in the UI, think about how the user is going to interact with it.  You hold a tablet differently than you do a phone, so make sure your designs work well there.

On the desktop you have even more to think about, when the user has a keyboard and mouse, but likely not a touch screen, you want to make sure the interface isn’t cumbersome.  Think about how scrolling will be different too, while it’s easy to swipe both vertically and horizontally on a phone or tablet, you usually only have a vertical scroll wheel on a desktop mouse.  But, you also have more precise control over a mouse pointer than you do with a finger-tip, so your interface should take advantage of that too.

Resources available to you

Now that you know what’s needed, here are some resources to help you.  Once again we have our community Balsamiq account available to anybody who wants to use it to create mockups (email me if you need an account).  I have created a new project for Core Apps Convergence that you can use to add your designs.  You can then submit links to your designs to the Design Team’s email above.  The Design Team has also provided a detailed Design Guide for Ubuntu SDK apps, including a section on Responsive Layouts that give some suggested patterns for different form factors.  You can also choose to use any tools you are comfortable with, as long as they Design Team and community developers can view it.

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Michael Hall

At the same time that Ubuntu 13.10 was released, we also went live with a new API documentation website here on the Ubuntu Developer Portal. This website will slowly replace our previous static docs, which came in a variety of formats, with a single structured place for all of our developer APIs. This new site, backed by Python and Django, will let us make our API documentation more easily discoverable, more comprehensive, and more interactive over time.

Screenshot from 2013-10-17 09:54:41

We launched the site with only the documentation for the Ubuntu UI Toolkit, as well as upstream QtQuick components. But in the past week we’ve added on to that API documentation for the new Content Hub, which allows confined apps to request access to files (pictures, music, etc) stored outside of their sandbox, as well as a full new section of HTML5 API docs covering the visual components developed to match the look and feel of their Qt/QML counterparts.

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Michael Hall

App Showdown Winners

The judging is finished and the scores are in, we now have the winners of this year’s Ubuntu App Showdown!  Over the course of six weeks, and using a beta release of the new Ubuntu SDK, our community of app developers were able to put together a number of stunningly beautiful, useful, and often highly entertaining apps.

We had everything from games to productivity tools submitted to the competition, written in QML, C++ and HTML5. Some were ports of apps that already existed on other platforms, but the vast majority were original apps created specifically for the Ubuntu platform. Best of all, these apps are all available to download and install from the new Click store on Ubuntu phones and tablets, so if you have a Nexus device or one with a community image of Ubuntu, you can try these and many more for yourself.  Now, on to the winners!

Original Apps #1: Karma Machine

karma_machine_subredditkarma_machine_contentkarma_machine_commentsKarma Machine is wonderful app for browsing Reddit, and what geek wouldn’t want a good Reddit app?  Developed by Brian Robles, Karma Machine has nearly everything you could want in a Reddit app, and takes advantage of touch gestures to make it easy to upvote and downvote both articles and comments.  It even supports user accounts so you can see your favorite subreddits easily.  On top of it’s functionality, Karma Machine is also visually appealing, with a good mix of animations, overlays and overall use of colors and layouts.  It is simply one of the best Reddit clients on any platform (having written my own Reddit client, that’s saying something!), and having it as an original Ubuntu app makes it a valuable addition to our ecosystem.  With all that, it’s little wonder that Karma Machine was tied for the top spot on the judges list!

Original Apps #1: Saucy Bacon

saucy_bacon_searchsaucy_bacon_toolbarsaucy_bacon_editSomething for the foodies among us, Saucy Bacon is a great way to find and manage recipes for your favorite dish. Backed by food2fork.com, this app lets you search for recipes from all over the web.  You can save them for future reference, and mark your favorites for easy access over and over again.  And since any serious cook is going to modify a recipe to their own tastes, Saucy Bacon even lets you edit recipes downloaded from somewhere else.  You can of course add your own unique recipe to the database as well.  It even lets you add photos to the recipe card directly from the camera, showing off some nice integration with the Ubuntu SDK’s sensor APIs and hardware capabilities.  All of this mouth-watering goodness secured developer Giulio Collura’s Saucy Bacon app a tie for the #1 stop for original Ubuntu apps in our contest.

Ported Apps #1: Snake

snake_introsnake_play2snake_play

The game Snake has taken many forms on many platforms throughout the years.  It’s combination of simple rules and every-increasing difficulty has made it a popular way to kill time for decades.  Developer Brad Wells has taken this classic game from Nokia’s discontinued Meego/Harmattan mobile OS, which used a slightly older version of Qt for app development, and updated it to work on Ubuntu using the Ubuntu SDK components.  Meego had a large number of high quality apps written for it back in it’s day, and this game proves that Ubuntu for phones and tablets can give those apps a new lease on life.

Go and get them all!

The 2013 Ubuntu App Showdown was an opportunity for us to put the new Ubuntu SDK beta through some real-world testing, and kick off a new app ecosystem for Ubuntu.  During the course of these six weeks we’ve received great feedback from our developer community, worked out a large number of bugs in the SDK, and added or plan to add many new features to our platform.

In addition to being some of the first users of the Ubuntu SDK, the app developers were also among the first to use the new Click packaging format and tools as well as the new app upload process that we’ve been working on to reduce review times and ease the process of publishing apps.  The fact that all of the submitted apps have already been published in the new app store is a huge testament to the success of that work, and to the engineers involved in designing and delivering it.

Once again congratulations to Brian Robles, Giulio Collura and Brad Wells, and a big thank you to everybody who participated or helped those who participated, and all of the engineers who have worked on building the Ubuntu SDK, Click tools and app store.  And if you have a supported device, you should try out the latest Ubuntu images, and try these and the many other apps already available for it.  And if you’re an app developer, or want to become an app developer, now is your time to get started with the Ubuntu SDK!

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Steve George

Today we are pleased to announce the beta release of the Ubuntu SDK! The SDK is the toolkit that will power Ubuntu’s convergence revolution, giving you one platform and one API for all Ubuntu form factors. This lets you write your app one time, in one way, and it will work everywhere.  You can read the full Ubuntu SDK Beta announcement here.

For the developers who are already writing apps using the Ubuntu SDK most of the beta’s features will already be known, as they have been landing in the daily releases as they become finished. Here’s a list of the features that have been added since the alpha:

  • Cordova Ubuntu HTML5 app template – leverage the Apache Cordova APIs to write Ubuntu apps with web technologies: HTML, JavaScript and CSS. Write your first HTML5 with the Cordova Ubuntu tutorial.
  • Ubuntu SDK HTML5 theme – a companion to all HTML5 apps: stylesheets and JavaScript code to provide the same look and feel as native apps
  • Responsive layout – applications can now adopt a more natural layout depending on form factor (phone, tablet, desktop) and orientation
  • Scope template – Scopes enable operators to prioritise their content, to achieve differentiation without fragmentation. Now easier to create with a code template
  • Click packaging preview – initial implementation of the Click technology to distribute applications. Package your apps with Click at the press of a button
  • Theme engine improvements – a reworked theme engine to make it easier and more flexible to customise the look and feel of your app
  • Unified Actions API – define actions to be used across different Ubuntu technologies: the HUD, App Indicators, the Launcher, the Messaging Menu
  • U1DB integration – the SDK now provides a database API to easily synchronise documents between devices, using the Ubuntu One cloud

Some of the biggest news here is the Cordova support and HTML5 theme, which brings together our goal of making first class HTML5 app that look and feel like native apps.  Cordova support means that apps written using the PhoneGap framework can be easily ported to Ubuntu Touch, and the HTML5 themes, written largely by community developer Adnane Belmadiaf, will allow those apps to match the native SDK components in both the way they look as well as the way the user interacts with them.

The Responsive Layouts, which landed in the daily SDK packages weeks go, gives developers the ability to adjust their application’s GUI dynamically at runtime, depending on the amount of screen space available or any number of other variables.  This is one key to making convergent apps that can adapt to be useful on both small touch screens and large monitors with a keyboard and mouse.

We’ve also put out the first set of Click packaging tools, which will provide an easier way for developers to package and distribute their applications both on their own and through the Ubuntu Software Center.  There is still a lot more work to do before all of the Click infrastructure is in place, but for now developers can start trying getting a feel for it.

All of that and more is now available, so grab the latest SDK packages, read the QML and HTML5 app development tutorials, and get a head start building your convergent Ubuntu application today!

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John Pugh

Oh boy. June stormed in and the May installment is late! Not much changed at the top. The Northern Hemisphere spring storms keep Stormcloud at the top with Fluendo DVD staying put at the number two spot. Steam continues its top of the chart spree on the Free Top 10.

Want to develop for the new Phone and Tablet OS, Ubuntu Touch? Be sure to check out the “Go Mobile” site for details.

Top 10 paid apps

  1. Stormcloud
  2. Fluendo DVD Player
  3. Filebot
  4. Quick ‘n Easy Web Builder
  5. MC-Launcher
  6. Mini Minecraft Launcher
  7. Braid
  8. UberWriter
  9. Drawers
  10. Bastion

Top 10 free apps

  1. Steam
  2. Motorbike
  3. Master PDF Editor
  4. Youtube to MP3
  5. Screencloud
  6. Nitro
  7. Splashtop Remote Desktop App for Linux
  8. CrossOver (Trial)
  9. Plex Media Server
  10. IntelliJ IDEA 12 Community Edition

Would you like to see your app featured in this list and on millions of user’s computers? It’s a lot easier than you think:

Notes:

  • The lists of top 10 app downloads includes only those applications submitted through My Apps on the Ubuntu App Developer Site. For more information about of usage of other applications in the Ubuntu archive, check out the Ubuntu Popularity Contest statistics.
  • The top 10 free apps list contains gratis applications that are distributed under different types of licenses, some of which may not be open source. For detailed license information, please check each application’s description in the Ubuntu Software Center.

Follow Ubuntu App Development on:

Social Media Icons by Paul Robert Lloyd

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