Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'ubuntu server'

caribou

If you are part of those people who are reluctant to upgrade to newer kernels, here is an example of how this can make your life miserable every 209 days.

There is a specific kernel bug in Lucid that will provoke a kernel panic after 208 days, which is regular behavior on a server (and a cloud instance ?). Here is the kernel GIT commit related to this :

http://kernel.ubuntu.com/git?p=ubuntu/ubuntu-lucid.git;a=commit;h=595378ac1dd449e5c379bf6caa9cdfab008974c8

This has been fixed in the ubuntu kernel since 2.6.32-38 months ago but if you prefer not to upgrade to earlier kernels on Lucid, you will be hit by this bug.

Read more
caribou

One year ago, I had done my last day after thirteen years with Digital Equipment Corp which became Compaq, then HP.  After starting on Digital Unix/Tru64, I had evolved to a second level support position in the Linux Global Competency Center.

In a few days, on the 18th, I will have completed my first full year as a Canonical employee. I think it is time to take a few minutes to look back at that year.

Coming from a RHEL/SLES environment with a bit of Debian, my main asset was the fact that I  had been an Ubuntu user since 5.04, using it as my sole operating system on my corporate laptop. The first week in the new job was also a peculiar experience, as it brought me back to my native country and to Montréal, a city that I love and where I lived for three years.  So I was not totally lost in my new environment. I also had the chance of ramping up my knowledge of Ubuntu Server, which was an easy task.  What was more surprizing and became one of the most exciting part of the new job is to work in a completely dedicated opensource environment from day one.

Rapidly I became aware of the fact that, participating in the Ubuntu community was not only possible, but it was expected.  That if I were to find a bug, I needed to report it and, if possible find ways to fix it.  In my previous job I was looking for existing solutions, or bringing in enough elements to my L3 counterpart that they would be able to request a fix to Red Hat or Novell.  Here if I was able to identify the problem and suggest a solution, I was encouraged to propose it as the final fix.  I also rapidly found out that the developpers were no longer the remote engineers in some changelog file, but IRC nicks that I could chat with and eventually meet.

Then came about Openstack in the summer : a full week of work with colleagues aimed at getting to know the technology, trying to master concepts that were very vague back then and making things work.  Getting Swift Object Store up and running and trying to figure out how best this could be used.  Here I was asked to do one of the think I like best : learning by getting things to work. This lead to a better understanding of what a cloud architecture was all about and really made me understand how useful and interesting a cloud infrastructure can be. Oh, and I did get to build my first openstack cloud.

This was another of this past year’s great experience : UDS-P. I had heard of UDS-O when I joined but it was too early for me to attend.  But after six months around it was time for UDS-P and, this time, I would be there.  Not only I had time to meet a good chunk of developpers, but I also got a lot of work done.  Like helping Michael Terry fix a bug on Deja-Dup that would only appear on localized systems, get advices on fixing kdump with the kernel team and some of the foundation engineers and a whole lot more.

Then came back the normal work for our customers, fixing their issues, trying to help improve their support experience and get better at what we do. And also seeing some of my fixes make it into our upcoming distribution and also back to the existing ones.  This was a great thrill and an objective that I did not think would come by so fast.

Being part of the Ubuntu community has been a great addition to my career. This makes me want to do even more and get the best out of our collective efforts.

This was a great year. Sure hope that the next one will be even better.

Read more
caribou

Recently, I have realized a major difference in how customer support is done on Ubuntu.

As you know, Canonical provides official customer support for Ubuntu both on server and desktop. This is the work I do : provice customer with the best level of support on the Ubuntu distribution.  This is also what I was doing on my previous job, but for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux and SuSE Linux Enterprise Server distributions.

The major difference that I recently realized is that, unlike my previous work with RHEL & SLES, the result of my work is now available to the whole Ubuntu community, not just to the customers that may for our support.

Here is an example. Recently one of our customer identified a bug with vm-builder in a very specific case.  The work that I did on this bug resulted in a patch that I submitted to the developers who accepted its inclusion in the code. In my previous life, this fix would have been made available only to customers paying a subscription to the vendors through their official update or service pack services.

With Ubuntu, through Launchpad and the regular community activity, this fix will become available to the whole community through the standard -updates channel of our public archives.

This is true for the vast majority of the fixes that are provided to our customers. As a matter of fact, the public archives are almost the only channel that we have to provide fixes to our customers, hence making them available to the whole Ubuntu community at the same time.  This is different behavior and something that makes me a bit prouder of the work I’m doing.

Read more
caribou

While testing Oneiric on a separate disk, I wanted to get some files off my laptop’s hard drive which is hosting my normal Natty’s install.  Keeping with a previous setup, I had installed my laptop with a fully encrypted hard disk, using the alternate CD, so I needed a procedure to do this manually.

Previously, I had tested booting the Natty LiveCD and, to my enlightened surprise, the Livce CD did see the encrypted HD and proceeded to ask for the passphrase in order to mount it.  But this time, I’m not running off the LiveCD, but from a complete install which is on a separate hard drive.  Since it took me a while to locate the proper procedure, I thought that I would help google a bit so it is not so deep in the pagerank for others next time.  But first, thanks to UbuntuGeek’s article Rescue and encrypted LUKS LVM volume for providing the solution.

Since creating an encrypted Home directory is easily achieved with standard installation methods, there are many references to how to achieve it for encrypted private directory. Dustin Kirkland’s blog is a very good source of information on those topics. But dealing with an encrypted partition requires a different approach. Here it is (at least for an encrypted partition done using the Ubuntu alternate DVD) :

First of all, you need to make sure that lvm2 and cryptsetup packages are installed. If not, go ahead and install them

 # sudo aptitude install cryptsetup lvm2

Then verify if the dm-crypt module is loaded and load it if it is not

 # sudo modprobe dm-crypt

Once this is done, open  the LUKS partition (using your own encrypted partition name) :

 # sudo cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda3 crypt1

You should have to provide the passphrase that is used to unlock your crypted partition here.

Once this is done, you must scan for the LVM volume groups :

 # sudo vgscan –mknodes
 # sudo vgchange -ay

There, you should get the name of the volume group that will be needed to mount the encrypted partition (which happens to be configured as an LVM volume). You can now procede to mount your partition (changing {volumegroup} with the name that you collected in the previous command ) :

# sudo mount /dev/{volumegroup}/root /mnt

Your encrypted data should now be available in the /mnt directory :-)

Read more