Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'canonical'

caribou

One year ago, I had done my last day after thirteen years with Digital Equipment Corp which became Compaq, then HP.  After starting on Digital Unix/Tru64, I had evolved to a second level support position in the Linux Global Competency Center.

In a few days, on the 18th, I will have completed my first full year as a Canonical employee. I think it is time to take a few minutes to look back at that year.

Coming from a RHEL/SLES environment with a bit of Debian, my main asset was the fact that I  had been an Ubuntu user since 5.04, using it as my sole operating system on my corporate laptop. The first week in the new job was also a peculiar experience, as it brought me back to my native country and to Montréal, a city that I love and where I lived for three years.  So I was not totally lost in my new environment. I also had the chance of ramping up my knowledge of Ubuntu Server, which was an easy task.  What was more surprizing and became one of the most exciting part of the new job is to work in a completely dedicated opensource environment from day one.

Rapidly I became aware of the fact that, participating in the Ubuntu community was not only possible, but it was expected.  That if I were to find a bug, I needed to report it and, if possible find ways to fix it.  In my previous job I was looking for existing solutions, or bringing in enough elements to my L3 counterpart that they would be able to request a fix to Red Hat or Novell.  Here if I was able to identify the problem and suggest a solution, I was encouraged to propose it as the final fix.  I also rapidly found out that the developpers were no longer the remote engineers in some changelog file, but IRC nicks that I could chat with and eventually meet.

Then came about Openstack in the summer : a full week of work with colleagues aimed at getting to know the technology, trying to master concepts that were very vague back then and making things work.  Getting Swift Object Store up and running and trying to figure out how best this could be used.  Here I was asked to do one of the think I like best : learning by getting things to work. This lead to a better understanding of what a cloud architecture was all about and really made me understand how useful and interesting a cloud infrastructure can be. Oh, and I did get to build my first openstack cloud.

This was another of this past year’s great experience : UDS-P. I had heard of UDS-O when I joined but it was too early for me to attend.  But after six months around it was time for UDS-P and, this time, I would be there.  Not only I had time to meet a good chunk of developpers, but I also got a lot of work done.  Like helping Michael Terry fix a bug on Deja-Dup that would only appear on localized systems, get advices on fixing kdump with the kernel team and some of the foundation engineers and a whole lot more.

Then came back the normal work for our customers, fixing their issues, trying to help improve their support experience and get better at what we do. And also seeing some of my fixes make it into our upcoming distribution and also back to the existing ones.  This was a great thrill and an objective that I did not think would come by so fast.

Being part of the Ubuntu community has been a great addition to my career. This makes me want to do even more and get the best out of our collective efforts.

This was a great year. Sure hope that the next one will be even better.

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caribou

Recently, I have realized a major difference in how customer support is done on Ubuntu.

As you know, Canonical provides official customer support for Ubuntu both on server and desktop. This is the work I do : provice customer with the best level of support on the Ubuntu distribution.  This is also what I was doing on my previous job, but for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux and SuSE Linux Enterprise Server distributions.

The major difference that I recently realized is that, unlike my previous work with RHEL & SLES, the result of my work is now available to the whole Ubuntu community, not just to the customers that may for our support.

Here is an example. Recently one of our customer identified a bug with vm-builder in a very specific case.  The work that I did on this bug resulted in a patch that I submitted to the developers who accepted its inclusion in the code. In my previous life, this fix would have been made available only to customers paying a subscription to the vendors through their official update or service pack services.

With Ubuntu, through Launchpad and the regular community activity, this fix will become available to the whole community through the standard -updates channel of our public archives.

This is true for the vast majority of the fixes that are provided to our customers. As a matter of fact, the public archives are almost the only channel that we have to provide fixes to our customers, hence making them available to the whole Ubuntu community at the same time.  This is different behavior and something that makes me a bit prouder of the work I’m doing.

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caribou

In my job as a support engineer, I spend my day trying to fix problem. So it is refreshing when, sometimes, the technology that we’re providing simply works.

Like this morning when I decided to test a total autonomous laptop setup. By that I mean that I will on the road tonight and might need internet access for m y laptop.  So I went ahead and configured my Android HTC Desire to act as a WiFi Hotspot.  Then I switched my laptop’s Wireless connection to the SSID that was broadcast by my phone; it connected right away.

Now since I’ll be in a car, I need to have some kind of headset to avoid street noises. So I powered my bluetooth  earphone that I had previously configured to be recognized by my laptop. I went in the notification area and selected the Bluetooth applet & saw that my earphone was been seen. So I connected it.  Now the only thing that doesn’t totally work as I would expect is that I needed to change the whole sound setup of my laptop to send all input and output to my earphone. I’m expecting to use Twinkle for phone calls, and it is the only way I found to have the earphone work properly. If someone knows how to be more selective and have Twinkle use the Bluetooth earphone, I’m a taker.

But this is not a show stopper.  So I fired up Twinkle, connected to my SIP account and dialed my home phone : Drriiiinngg!!!

So I’m there, with my Android phone connecting me to the Internet, my laptop acting as a telephone, while I still have full laptop functionality. I must say that I’m impressed. Don’t get me wrong : I’ve been using Ubuntu since Hoary, and Debian before that.  But nowaday, with all the great work done on those tools, it make rather complex setups work smoothly.

Bravo !

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caribou

As many around me know, I have recently moved to a new job with Canonical.  This journey started quite funnily on April 18th by a Support Sprint event in our Montréal’s office. I say funnily because, while I now lives in France, near Versailles, I was born in northern Québec and I have lived in Montréal for three years before moving to France.

This Sprint week was a great occasion to meet with my new colleagues and to jumpstart my exposure to my new job by learning as much as I could about Natty, both on server and desktop with those responsible for providing top class support to our customers.  But most of all, it was an occasion to meet face to face, to interact with colleagues, learn to know them and understand a bit more about the context of how things are done at Canonical.

Then a little while after coming back home, I got that email from Jono Bacon, encouraging us to do more blogging. Talk about a cultural shock ! For years, I pushed myself into maintaining an internal blog at my prior job, worrying about the possibility that it would be seen as a waste of my time by some manager.  I even seen a few occurrences where very good “internal” bloggers were forced to abandon their blogging activities because of some politically incorrect statement that did not please some high ranking manager.  So being encouraged to go out on the open and talk about what I do, how it is to work here at Canonical, how I think I can help improve our customer’s experience did made my day.

So why did it took me so long to react, to start writing ? Call it paranoia, historical worries, I don’t know. I also wanted to take the opportunity to take out some of the english posts out of my french speaking blog, which required some reworking of my own personal WordPress infrastructure.  But that’s all done now. It’s time to go ahead and start sharing how it is like to “really” be a part of the Open Source effort.

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