Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'programming'

Michael Hall

During this latest round of arguing over the inclusion of Amazon search results in the Unity Dash, Alan Bell pointed out the fact that while the default scopes shipped in Ubuntu were made to check the new privacy settings, we didn’t do a very good job of telling third-party developers how to do it.

(Update: I was told a better way of doing this, be sure to read the bottom of the post before implementing it in your own code)

Since I am also a third-party lens developer, I decided to add it to my come of my own code and share how to do it with other lens/scope developers.  It turns out, it’s remarkably easy to do.

Since the privacy setting is stored in DConf, which we can access via the Gio library, we need to include that in our GObject Introspection imports:

from gi.repository import GLib, Unity, Gio

Then, before performing a search, we need to fetch the Unity Lens settings:

lens_settings = Gio.Settings(‘com.canonical.Unity.Lenses’)

The key we are interested in is ’remote-content-search’, and it can have one of two value, ‘all’ or ‘none’.  Since my locoteams-scope performs only remote searches, by calling the API on http://loco.ubuntu.com, if the user has asked that no remote searches be made, this scope will return without doing anything.

And that’s it!  That’s all you need to do in order to make your lens or scope follow the user’s privacy settings.

Now, before we get to the comments, I’d like to kindly point out that this post is about how to check the privacy setting in your lens or scope.  It is not about whether or not we should be doing remote searches in the dash, or how you would rather the feature be implemented.  If you want to pile on to those argument some more, there are dozens of open threads all over the internet where you can do that.  Please don’t do it here.
&nbps;

Update

I wasn’t aware, but there is a PreferencesManager class in Unity 6 (Ubuntu 12.10) that lets you access the same settings:

You should use this API instead of going directly to GSettings/DConf.

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Michael Hall

Now that Google+ has added a Communities feature, and seeing as how Jorge Castro has already created one for the wider Ubuntu community, I went ahead and created one specifically for our application developers.  If you are an existing app developer, or someone who is interested in getting started with app development, or thinking about porting an existing app to Ubuntu, be sure to join.

Google+ communities are brand new, so we’ll be figuring out how best to use them in the coming days and weeks, but it seems like a great addition.

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Michael Hall

Shortly after the Ubuntu App Showdown earlier this year, Didier Roche and Michael Terry kicked off a series of discussions about a ground-up re-write of Quickly.  Not only would this fix many of the complications app developers experienced during the Showdown competition, but it would also make it easier to write tools around Quickly itself.

Unfortunately, neither Didier nor Michael were going to have much time this cycle to work on the reboot.  We had a UDS session to discuss the initiative, but we were going to need community contributions in order to get it done.

JFDI

I was very excited about the prospects of a Quickly reboot, but knowing that the current maintainers weren’t going to have time to work on it was a bit of a concern.  So much so, that during my 9+ hour flight from Orlando to Copenhagen, I decided to have a go at it myself. Between the flight, a layover in Frankfurt without wifi, and a few late nights in the Bella Sky hotel, I had the start of something promising enough to present during the UDS session.  I was pleased that both Didier and Michael liked my approach, and gave me some very good feedback on where to take it next.  Add another 9+ hour flight home, and I had a foundation on which a reboot can begin.

Where is stands now

My code branch is now a part of the Quickly project on Launchpad, you can grab a copy of it by running bzr branch lp:quickly/reboot.  The code currently provides some basic command-line functionality (including shell completion), as well as base classes for Templates, Projects and Commands.  I’ve begun porting the ubuntu-application template, reusing the current project_root files, but built on the new foundation.  Currently only the ‘create’ and ‘run’ commands have been converted to the new object-oriented command class.

I also have examples showing how this new approach will allow template authors to easily sub-class Templates and Commands, by starting both a port of the ubuntu-cli template, and also creating an ubuntu-git-application template that uses git instead of bzr.

What comes next

This is only the very beginning of the reboot process, and there is still a massive amount of work to be done.  For starters, the whole thing needs to be converted from Python 2 to Python 3, which should be relatively easy except for one area that does some import trickery (to keep Templates as python modules, without having to install them to PYTHON_PATH).  The Command class also needs to gain argument parameters, so they can be easily introspected to see what arguments they can take on the command line.  And the whole thing needs to gain a structured meta-data output mechanism so that non-Python application can still query it for information about available templates, a project’s commands and their arguments.

Where you come in

As I said at the beginning of the post, this reboot can only succeed if it has community contributions.  The groundwork has been laid, but there’s a lot more work to be done than I can do myself.  Our 13.04 goal is to have all of the existing functionality and templates (with the exception of the Flash template) ported to the reboot.  I can use help with the inner-working of Quickly core, but I absolutely need help porting the existing templates.

The new Template and Command classes make this much easier (in my opinion, anyway), so it will mostly be a matter of copy/paste/tweak from the old commands to the new ones. In many cases, it will make sense to sub-class and re-use parts of one Template or Command in another, further reducing the amount of work.

Getting started

If you are interested in helping with this effort, or if you simply want to take the current work for a spin, the first thing you should do is grab the code (bzr branch lp:quickly/reboot).  You can call the quickly binary by running ./bin/quickly from within the project’s root.

Some things you can try are:

./bin/quickly create ubuntu-application /tmp/foo

This will create a new python-gtk project called ‘foo’ in /tmp/foo.  You can then call:

./bin/quickly -p /tmp/foo run

This will run the applicaiton.  Note that you can use -p /path/to/project to make the command run against a specific project, without having to actually be in that directory.  If you are in that directory, you won’t need to use -p (but you will need to give the full path to the new quickly binary).

If you are interested in the templates, they are in ./data/templates/, each folder name corresponds to a template name.  The code will look for a class called Template in the base python namespace for the template (in ubuntu-application/__init__.py for example), which must be a subclass of the BaseTemplate class.  You don’t have to define the class there, but you do need to import it there.  Commands are added to the Template class definition, they can take arguments at the time you define them (see code for examples), and their .run() method will be called when invoked from the command line.  Unlike Templates, Commands can be defined anywhere, with any name, as long as they subclass BaseCommand and are attached to a template.

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Michael Hall

When the Unity developers introduced Dash Previews in Unity 6, I knew it was something I wanted to add to Singlet.  I didn’t have time to get the feature added in time to get it into Quantal’s Universe archive, but thanks to Didier Roche and Iain Lane, I was able to get it into Quantal’s Backports archive before the actual release date, so it will be available to all Ubuntu users right away.

Previews for all!

One of the main goals of Singlet, second only to making it easy to write Unity lenses and scopes, was to automatically add new features to any lenses and scopes written with it.  Previews are my first opportunity to put this into practice.  Singlet 0.3 will add Preview information for any Scope or SingleScopeLens written for Singlet 0.2!  To do this, Singlet 0.3 will use the same image, title and description used in the search results to populate the preview.  This is a big improvement over having no preview at all, and there is absolutely nothing the developer needs to do. Even better, if you have a custom handle_uri method, it will also add an “Open” button to your preview which will call it.

Better, faster, simpler Previews

Getting previews for free is nice, but it does limit the preview to only the information you are giving to the result item.  But the Previews API allows you to do so much more, and Singlet lenses and scopes can take full advantage of them.

The simplest way to add more data to your preview is to add a method to your Scope or SingleScopeLens class called add_preview_data.  This method will be called whenever Unity needs to show a preview for one of your result items, and will be given the specific result item being previewed, as well as a reference to the Unity.Preview object itself.

def add_preview_data(self, result_item, preview):
    if result_item['category'] == self.lens.events:
        url_parts = result_item['uri'].split('/')
        event = self._ltp.getTeamEvent(url_parts[5])
        venue = self._ltp.getVenue(event['venue'])
        if 'latitude' in venue and 'longitude' in venue:
            preview.props.image_source_uri = 'http://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/staticmap?center=%s,%s&zoom=11&size=600x600&markers=%s,%s&sensor=false' % (venue['latitude'], venue['longitude'], venue['latitude'], venue['longitude'])

The result_item is a Python dict containing the keys ‘uri’, ‘image’, ‘category’, ‘mime-type’, ‘title’, ‘description’, and ‘dnd-uri’, the same fields you added to the results model in your search field. The code above, added to the LoCo Teams scope, sets the Preview image to a Google Maps view of the venue’s location. You can also add additional Preview Actions from within this method.

If you want even more control, you can instead add a method called simply preview to your class, which takes the result_item and the full result_model from your scope, letting you create a Unity.Preview object yourself, and doing whatever you want with it.

def preview(self, result_item, result_model):
    preview = Unity.GenericPreview.new(result_item['title'], result_item['description'], None)
    preview.props.image_source_uri = result_item['image']

    some_action = Unity.PreviewAction.new("do_something", "Do Something", None)
    some_action.connect('activated', self.do_something)
    preview.add_action(some_action)

    return preview

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Michael Hall

Back in San Francisco, during UDS-Q, we had a discussion about the need for better online documentation for the various APIs that application developers use to write apps for Ubuntu.  The Ubuntu App Showdown and subsequent AppDevUploadProcess spec work has consumed most of my time since then, but I was able to start putting together a spec for such a site.  The App Showdown feedback we got from our developers survey highlighted the need, as lack of good Gtk documentation for Python was one of the most common problems people experienced, giving it a little more urgency.

Fortunately, Alberto Ruiz was at UDS, and told me about a project he had started for Gnome called Gnome Developer Network (GDN for short).  Alberto had already done quite a bit of work on the database models and GObject Instropection parsing needed to populate it.  The plan is to use GDN as the database and import process, and build a user-friendly web interface on top of that, linking in external resources like tutorials and AskUbuntu questions, as well as user submitted comments and code snippets.

Now that the spec is (mostly) done, we need to get together some developers who can implement it.  There will be a lot of front-end work (mostly HTML, CSS and Javascript), but also enough backend work (Python and Django) to keep anybody occupied.  I’ve created a Launchpad project for the site, and a team you can join if you’re interested in helping out.

The GDN code and some very basic template are already available. You can get the code from bzr with bzr branch lp:ubuntu-api-website and following the instructions in the DEVELOPMENT file.  I’ll also be running a live App Developer Q&A Session at 1700 UTC today (September 19th), and would be happy to help anybody get the code up and running during that time.

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Michael Hall

You can watch the App Developer Q&A live stream starting at 1700 UTC (or watch the recording of it afterwards):

Questions should be asked in the #ubuntu-on-air IRC channel on freenode.

You can ask me anything about app development on Ubuntu, getting things into the Software Center, or the recent Ubuntu App Showdown competition.

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Michael Hall

Due to the popularity of the Ubuntu App Showdown Workshops, I plan to start holding a weekly Q&A session for all Ubuntu app developers using the same format: A live Google+ Hangout with IRC chat.

The first of these will be Wednesday of this week, at 1700 UTC (6pm London, 1pm US Eastern, 10am US Pacific).  Because it will be an On-Air hangout, I won’t have a link until I start the session, but I will post it here on my blog before it starts.  For IRC, I plan on using the #ubuntu-on-air channel on Freenode, though again the exact details will be posted the day of the session.

So bring your questions about developing apps for Ubuntu, packaging an submitting them to the Software Center.  If I can’t answer your question myself, I’ll help you find someone who can.

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Michael Hall

As part of the Ubuntu App Showdown I started on a small project to provide a nice GUI frontend to Quickly.  While I was able to get it working and submitted before the contest deadline, I unfortunately didn’t have the time to make it do everything I wanted.  Since the end of the contest, however, I was able to spend a little more time adding some nice features to it.

Project Management

The majority of the work has gone into Quickly-Gtk’s project management.  Some of this was implemented already, such as the ability to switch the “current” project. But internally it was all kind of a mess of code to track that.  So I replaced all of that with a ProjectManager class that will store both the list of projects Quickly-Gtk knows about, but also keeps track of which project is “current”.  This class also implements Observer design pattern to let other parts of the code know about changes to both the list of projects and the current project.  This made it easy to, for example, display a notification on the screen whenever the current project was changed, regardless of whether it was changed in the window, the indicator, or from a Zeitgeist event.

Zeitgeist event monitoring

The other big development was integrating Quickly-Gtk with Zeitgeist.  For those that aren’t familiar with it, Zeitgeist is an event log that tracks all kinds of user activities and system events.  Applications can read past events or monitor them as they happen.  I wanted Quickly-Gtk to be smart enough to switch to a project as soon as the user started working on it, without requiring the user to make the switch themselves.  To do that, I set a Zeitgeist monitor to listen for file system events in any of the saved project directories.  I also set it to watch for the user viewing the project’s Launchpad page.  If any of those events happen, Quickly-Gtk will automatically make that the current project.

The future of Quickly-Gtk

While I was able to get a lot done with Quickly-Gtk, the underlying Quickly API and command line really weren’t designed to support this kind of use.  However, as a result of what we learned during the App Showdown, Didier Roche has begun planning a reboot of Quickly, which will improve both it’s command-line functionality, and it’s ability to be used as a callable library for apps like Quickly-Gtk.  If you are interested in the direction of Quickly’s development, I urge you to join in those planning meetings.

 

Launchpad Project: https://launchpad.net/quickly-gtk

 

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Michael Hall

Following yesterday’s announcement of the Ubuntu Webapps project, I really wanted to find a way to try it out on a website.  I chose my personal blog (this one) as my guinea pig.

Since this site is powered by WordPress, it seemed that the best way to add Ubuntu Webapps integration was to make a plugin.  Now I’m not a big fan of writing WordPress backend code, not only is it PHP but I’ve found the API documentation lacking and the actual API implementation a bit of a mess.

However, after only a few hours of work (90% of which was spent trying to get the WP API to work), I had a very basic plugin that would export all my published pages to the Unity HUD.  If you have already installed the Ubuntu Webapps preview, you should have been asked if you want to integrate this site already.  If you did, you will get this in your HUD:

The code is licensed under the AGPLv2, and can be branched from my bazaar branch.

To install it, just copy the ubuntuwebapps.php file into your wp-content/plugins/ directory, then activate the plugin from the WP admin.  And remember this is 0.1 code that is mere hours old.  You have been warned.

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Michael Hall

As you’ve probably heard already, Ubuntu is running an App Developer Showdown competition where contestants have three weeks to build an Ubuntu app from scratch.  The rules are simple: It has to be new code, it has to run on Ubuntu, and it has to be submitted to the Software Center.  The more you use Ubuntu’s tools, the better your chances of winning will be.  This week we ran a series of workshops introducing these tools and how they can be used.  It all seemed like so much fun, that I’ve decided to participate with my own submission!

Now 2 our of the 6 judges for this competition are my immediate co-workers, so let me just start off by saying that I will not be eligible for any of the prizes.  But it’s still a fun and interesting challenge, so I’m going to participate anyway.  But what is my entry going to be?  Well in my typical fashion of building tools for tools, I’ve decided to write a GUI wrapper on to of Quickly, using Quickly.

Before I started on any code, I first wanted to brainstorm some ideas about the interface itself.  For that I went back to my favorite mockup tool: Pencil.  I knew I wanted to cover all of Quickly’s functions, both for creating projects and working on them afterwards.  I also wanted something that would keep track of my projects, so I wouldn’t have to find where they are on my disk whenever I wanted to hack on them.

Now, I’ve never been a fan of GUI builders.  Even back when I was writing Java/Swing apps, and GUI builders were all the rage, I never used them.  I didn’t use one for Hello Unity, and I wasn’t planning on using Glade for this project either.  But after Jono’s fantastic workshop session about Glade, I decided to give it another chance.  I found that I was able to get a basic UI built and running in very little time.  I’m still struggling with some, and there’s a point where you need to switch from Glade to code, but all in all it has saved me a significant amount of time.

Quickly also saved me a large amount of time, both in creating the project and adding things too it.  Being able to add an Application Indicator to your app by just running “quickly add indicator” is amazing.  From there is was a simple matter to build a menu based on available Quickly commands and tie them in with callback functions.

But the part I like the best about this app so far, is that it’s useful even when you’re not using it.  Most of the time you spend developing a Quickly app is going to be in some other application, such as your code editor of choice, Glade or something.  Thanks to Unity’s HUD, and the fact that it’s smart enough to check Indicator menus in addition to the focused application’s menus, you can call your Quickly commands any time, simply by tapping ‘Alt’ and the command you want to run.  It’s like having Quickly integrated into all of your other tools.

And thanks to the developer tools available in Ubuntu, I was able to accomplish all of this in only a few hours of work.

Now it’s very, very far from being complete.  For instance, the “active” project is hard-coded to my quickly-gtk working directory, it can’t start a project yet, or support commands that take optional arguments or user input.  But in a short amount of time I was able to go from a mockup to a working layout and even some functional code.  It even packages successfully, something I found out quite by accident when I selected “Share” from the indicator menu and ended up with a package in my PPA.

Building an app in 4 hours then accidentally building a proper package and uploading it to a PPA, who’d have thought we’d ever make it that easy?  I hope you all are having as much fun and success in your showdown applications as I am.

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Michael Hall

Expanding on my previous post calling for pkgme backend contributors, here’s a list of the backends we would like to see added, and who in the community you can contact for help in making them. If you can act as a mentor for one of these backends, please say so in the comments and I will add your name to the list.    For any questions about pkgme itself, and what options are available to backends, your best bet is to ask James Westby (james_w) in the #pkgme channel on freenode.

Qt/qmake

QMake is a Makefile-generator. It uses information that the application author puts into a project file to build the Makefile for a project. A qmake backend would need to either use qmake to extract the information requested by pkgme, or parse the same project file that qmake uses in order to provide that information.

Information about qmake: http://qt-project.org/doc/qt-4.8/qmake-manual.html

Help Contact: Angelo Compagnucci

Flash

Flash applications can be packaged for Ubuntu by wrapping them in a GTK window that contains a Webkit browser widget, and an index.html file for it to load that embeds the given flash file.

The Quickly Flash template currently does much the same thing. To do the same in pkgme, you will need to pass the necessary wrapper files to the extra_files request. extra_files should return a JSON object where the key is the file path relative to the root of the target application, and the value is the contents of that file.

Help Contacts: Michael Terry and Stuart Langridge

HTML5

A backend for an HTML5 application would also require wrapping the target application in a GTK window with embedded Webkit widget. Only instead of creating an index.html, you would just point the Webkit widget to the target application’s HTML files.

Help Contact: Didier Roche

Java

The Java backend would need to parse ant’s build.xml files to extract information about the target application or an already built jar file’s manifest.

Help Contact: James Page

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Michael Hall

pkgme is a small utility created by James Westby, its purpose is to create a Debian package for any unpackaged applications.  It’s currently used when applications are submitted through the Ubuntu Developer Portal as tarballs, inspecting the contents of the application to determine how to build a package from it.  In order to support many different types and configurations of application, James built pkgme to support any number of different backends.

Currently there is support for apps using Python and Distutils, apps compiled by cmake, and apps written in Vala.  But there are still many, many applications out there that aren’t covered by these backends, including Qt apps, HTML5 apps, Flash apps and more.  That’s where you, dear contributor, come in.

UPDATE: Here is a list of desired backends and mentors to help you with them.

But I don’t know how to create packages!

That’s okay, you don’t need to know how to make packages to create a pkgme backend.  It already knows how to make packages, what it doesn’t know is where to find the information it needs to do that.  This is what backends are, just one or more small scripts that extract enough information about a project to let pkgme do its thing.

Ok, I’m interested, how do I start?

First of all, get a copy of the latest pkgme code from its bazaar branch in Launchpad:

bzr branch lp:pkgme ./pkgme

Then, create a VirtualEnv environment to install it into:

virtualenv ./env

Then, install it into the Virtualenv:

source ./env/bin/activate
cd ./pkgme
python setup.py develop

Now you’ve got a working pkgme installed and running in your virtualenv. You can leave your virtualenv by running ‘deactivate’.  Time to get started on your backend!

Where do I put my new backend code?

Since we’re going to submit your new backend to the pkgme branch, we can just create it there:

cd ..
mkdir ./pkgme/pkgme/backends/<your backend name>

Great, now I have an empty Backend, what do I put here?

The first thing your backend needs is a ‘want’ file.  You see, in order for pkgme to know which backend it should use on any particular application, it needs to ask every backend how much they want it.  It does this by executing a script named ‘want’ in each backend.

Your want file is executed from the target application’s directory, so in your script ./ will be the root of the target application’s directory.  This lets you script easily browse through the files in the application to determine how well it can provide packaging information for it.

In order to tell pkgme how much your backend wants to handle the target application, your ‘want’ file simply needs to print a number to STDOUT.  The backend with the highest number is the one pkgme will use.  These are the suggested ranges for your ‘want’ value:

  • 0 – no information can be provided about the project (e.g. a Ruby backend with a Python project).
  • 10 – some information can be provided, but the backend is generic (e.g. Ruby backend).
  • 20 – some information can be provided, and the backend is more generic than just language (e.g. Ruby on Rails backend).
  • 30 – some information can be provided, and the backend is highly specialized.

Now I have what I want, what do I do with it?

Once pkgme has chosen your backend to use against an application, it will call one or more scripts from your backend to get information about the application.  As the backend author, you can choose to provide separate scripts for each piece of information, or you can provide just a single script called ‘all_info’ that will provide everything.

Lots of scripts

For separate scripts, you will need to provide an executable in your backend directory for each of the pieces of information that pkgme might request.  Each script should print that information to STDOUT, or exit with an error if it can not provide it.

Just one script

However, if looking up bits of information one at a time is a time-consuming task for your backend, you can do it all in one shot.  If you want to do that, then the only script you need is one called ‘all_info’.  When this script is called, it is also given a JSON list on STDIN.  This list contains the keys for all the pieces of information that pkgme needs from your backend.  As output, this scripts needs to print a JSON dictionary to STDOUT.  This dictionary should contain a key for each of the fields sent as input, along with its corresponding value.  If your backend can’t provide a value for one of those fields, it should be left out of the dictionary.

You can test your new backend by switching to the directory of a project your backend is made to support, and running:

pkgme

Make sure your virtualenv is still activated, or pkgme won’t be found. If everything works, you should have a ./debian/ directory in the application’s root folder.

Hurray, my backend works.  Do you want it?

Of course we want it!  What a silly question.  And it’s already in your local branch of pkgme too!  Well, it’s in the directory anyway, you still need to add it to the workingset:

cd ./pkgme/pkgme/backends/
bzr add <your backend name>

Then commit your changes and push them back to Launchpad:

bzr commit -m "Added backend for <your backend name>"
bzr push lp:~<your lp username>/pkgme/add-backend-<your backend name>

Then head on over to https://code.launchpad.net/pkgme, click on your new branch name, and then click the “propose for merging” link.  Fill out the description of what your backend adds, and submit it.  From there it will get reviewed by one of pkgme’s maintainers, and either get merged into the main branch, or sent back to you for fixes.

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Michael Hall

Sweet Chorus

Juju is revolutionizing the way web services are deployed in the cloud, taking what was either a labor-intensive manual task, or a very labor-intensive re-invention of the wheel  (or deployment automation in this case), and distilling it into a collection of reusable components called “Charms” that let anybody deploy multiple inter-connected services in the cloud with ease.

There are currently 84 Juju charms written for everything from game backends to WordPress sites, with databases and cache servers that work with them.  Charms are great when you can deploy the same service the same way, regardless of it’s intended use.  Wordpress is a good use case, since the process of deploying WordPress is going to be the same from one blog to the next.

Django’s Blues

But when you go a little lower in the stack, to web frameworks, it’s not quite so simple.  Take Django, for instance.  While much of the process of deploying a Django service will be the same, there is going to be a lot that is specific to the project.  A Django site can have any number of dependencies, both common additions like South and Celery, as well as many custom modules.  It might use MySQL, or PostgreSQL, or Oracle (even SQLite for development and testing).  Still more things will depend on the development process, while WordPress is available in a DEB package, or a tarball from the upstream site, a Django project may be anywhere, and most frequently in a source control branch specific to that project.  All of this makes writing a single Django charm nearly impossible.

There have been some attempts at making a generic, reusable Django charm.  Michael Nelson made one that uses Puppet and a custom config.yaml for each project.  While this works, it has two drawbacks: 1) It requires Puppet, which isn’t natural for a Python project, and 2) It required so many options in the config.yaml that you still had to do a lot by hand to make it work.  The first of these was done because ISD (where Michael was at the time) was using Puppet to deploy and configure their Django services, and could easily have been done another way.  The second, however, is the necessary consequence of trying to make a reusable Django charm.

Just for Fun

Given the problems detailed above, and not liking the idea of making config options for every possible variation of a Django project, I recently took a different approach.  Instead of making one Django Charm to rule them all, I wrote a small Django App that would generate a customized Charm for any given project.  My goal is to gather enough information from the project and it’s environment to produce a charm that is very nearly complete for that project.  I named this charming code “Naguine” after Django Reinhardt’s second wife, Sophie “Naguine” Ziegler.  It seemed fitting, since this project would be charming Django webapps.

Naguine is very much a JFDI project, so it’s not highly architected or even internally consistent at this point, but with a little bit of hacking I was able to get a significant return. For starters, using Naguine is about as simple as can be, you simply install it on your PYTHONPATH and run:

python manage.py charm --settings naguine

The –settings naguine will inject the naguine django app into your INSTALLED_APPS, which makes the charm command available.

This Kind of Friend

The charm command makes use of your Django settings to learn about your other INSTALLED_APPS as well as your database settings.  It will also look for a requirements.txt and setup.py, inspecting each to learn more about your project’s dependencies.  From there it will try to locate system packages that will provide those dependencies and add them to the install hook in the Juju  charm.

The charm command also looks to see if your project is currently in a bzr branch, and if it is it will use the remote branch to pull down your  project’s code during the install.  In  the future I hope to also support git and hg deployments.

Finally the command will write hooks for linking to a database instance on another server, including running syncdb to create the tables for your models, adding a superuser account with a randomly generated password and, if you are using South, running any migration scripts as well. It also writes some metadata about your charm and a short README explaining how to use it.

All that is left for you to do is review the generated charm, manually add any dependencies Naguine couldn’t find a matching package for, and manually add any install or database initialization that is specific to your project.  The amount of custom work needed to get a charm working is extremely minor, even for moderately complex projects.

Are you in the Mood

To try Naguine with your Django project, use the following steps:

  1. cd to your django project root (where your manage.py is)
  2. bzr branch lp:naguine
  3. python manage.py charm –settings naguine

That’s all you need.  If your django project lives in a bzr branch, and if it normally uses settings.py, you should have a directory called ./charms/precise/ that contains an almost working Juju charm for your project.

I’ve only tested this on a few Django project, all of which followed the same general conventions when it came to development, so don’t be surprised if you run into problems.  This is still a very early-stage project after all.  But you already have the code (if you followed step #2 above), so you can poke around and try to get it working or working better for your project.  Then submit your changes back to me on Launchpad, and I’ll merge them in.  You can also find me on IRC (mhall119 on freenode) if you get stuck and I will help you get it working.

(For those who are interested, each of the headers in this post is the name of a Django Reinhardt song)

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Michael Hall

My big focus during the week of UDS will be on improving our Application Developer story, tools and services.  Ubuntu 12.04 is already an excellent platform for app developers, now we need to work on spreading awareness of what we offer and polishing any rough edges we find.  Below are the list of sessions I’ll be leading or participating in that focus on these tasks.

And if you’re curious about what else I’ll be up to, my full schedule for the week can be found here: http://summit.ubuntu.com/uds-q/participant/mhall119/

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Michael Hall

Ubuntu 12.04, the Precise Pangolin, is scheduled to be released in a little over a week.  This is a very exciting release for us, not only is it an LTS release with 5 years of support, but it also brings some major improvements to Unity and other areas of the desktop.  It’s also going to see a very big focus on independent application developers.

Developers, Developers, Developers!

During the last six months we’ve spent a lot of time building tools and documentation for app developers.  In September of 2011 we launched the Ubuntu Developer Portal, a site dedicated to helping application developers target the Ubuntu platform, and for getting their applications distributed through Ubuntu.

The developer portal provides all the information an app developer needs to write apps for Ubuntu.  It will get you started with tools like Quickly, tell you what languages, toolkits and IDEs are available, and introduce you to the tools and workflows that make developing for Ubuntu a joy.

Once your app is ready, the Developer Portal will walk you through packaging it and submitting it to be published in the Ubuntu Software Center.  The MyApps section lets you upload and manage all your applications, provide branding and screenshots, and set your purchase price.

Going Native

In the past couple of months we’ve added extensive documentation on Unity integration, which allows your application to become part of the desktop experience.  The Unity APIs give your application a presence in multiple areas of the desktop, letting you to add extra information to the Launcher, indicators in the panel, search results in the Dash and more.

All about the Apps

Everybody knows that “Apps” are the big thing now.  No longer relegated to tablets and smartphones, “App Stores” are coming to both major proprietary desktop operating systems as well.  The Ubuntu Software Center already supports independent free and paid app downloads, and with 12.04 we want to grow that segment exponentially.

Not only do we provide a rich platform for app developers to target, we also have the means of delivering those apps directly to over 12 million users worldwide.  With Unity, your app isn’t just visible in the Ubuntu Software Center, but we put it right in the Dash!  Your app will show up whenever the user searches their system for something similar, giving it a level of visibility that no other platform offers.

Join the conversation

Developing applications for Ubuntu doesn’t have to be something you do in isolation.  Having a strong community is an important aspect in today’s software market, and Ubuntu provides you with the tools for collaborating with the existing Ubuntu user community and for growing a strong user community around your own application.    These users can help grow your app by add translations, identify bugs, and even submitting patches.

We’re also building a vibrant community of app developers, and we want you to be a part of that.  Learn tips and tricks from other app developers, share your own expertise and build professional connections.  Here you will also find a number of Ubuntu and Canonical developers who will take your suggestions and feedback for making app development on Ubuntu even better.

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Michael Hall

Hello Unity is now open for translations!

Please help me make this technology showcase is available to application developers in your native language.  Translations are done through Launchpad, and will be built into the Hello Unity package.

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Michael Hall

I spent some more time over the weekend working on Hello Unity.  If you haven’t already, be sure to read my first post about it.  In short, Hello Unity is a showcase application that demonstrates all the different ways an application developer can integrate their app with the Unity desktop.

The current version of Hello Unity sports a new syntax-highlighted code display, which makes it much easier to read and understand what the code is doing.  I also spent a significant amount of time going through and heavily commenting the code to explain what everything was doing.

In the Launcher section I added support for setting the “urgent” status of the application.  In Unity, this will cause the application’s icon in the Launcher to shake and, if the Launcher is set to auto-hide, will also cause the icon to slide out into view while it shakes.  This is a very useful way of telling a user that your application needs their attention.

A new section was added for integrating with the Message Menu.  It automatically adds a Hello Unity section to the menu, and allows you to add count indicators to it.  Clicking on an item in the menu will execute the code for removing it.  All of this is explicitly commented on in the source code.

Another new section is for Notifications.  While it uses the generic libnotify API, it does highlight how to use it with Ubuntu’s Notify-OSD display system, including how to updated and append text to the currently displayed notification.

Once again, if you are interested in contributing to this project, you can get the code from the Launchpad project page.  Also available there are source tarballs and installable .DEB files.

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Michael Hall

David Planella and I have spent the past couple of weeks gathering, cleaning and verifying Unity integration documentation that has existed on the Ubuntu wiki, individual blogs and inside the source code itself.   After publishing those docs, a couple of people asked for some kind of simple “hello world” type of application to show off how all that integration works.

So, I made one.

You can get the code from Launchpad:

bzr branch lp:hello-unity

It’s not complete yet, but it’s a start.  Let me know if you’re interesting in contributing to it.

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Michael Hall

Everybody knows that programmers can contribute to Unity, and I’ve shown in my previous posts that non-developers can still contribute features and fixes that make applications integrate better.  But what if your skills lay more on the creative side of the spectrum?

Well it just so happens that you have something to contribute to Unity too.  In fact, we’re currently in need of some graphic design talent to put some extra polish on some areas of application integration.  Specifically, we need people to help create vector art for application icons that only have raster images, PNG, XPM, etc.

This wiki page contains a list of applications that have been identified as needing an SVG icon.

Now graphic creation isn’t my specialty, so I’m not going to write a step by step guide to creating these images, that’s up to you artists.  What I am going to do, however, is walk you through the process of coordinating with the upstream application developers and submitting your finished image to Ubuntu.

1) Contact the upstream

This is an important step, because even if an application doesn’t have an SVG icon in Ubuntu, there’s still a chance that one already exists.  Read over the first half of my post on upstreaming Quicklists for ways to get in contact with with them. Ask them if they have an SVG  source for their application’s icon.  If they do, that’s great! You can take that and skip down to step #3.  If they don’t, then you will need to work with the upstream project to create one that is right for them.

2) Work with the current image

It’s important that we don’t try and re-brand an application unless the authors want it re-branded.  What we want is a more flexible/scalable version of the image icon we already have.  If you are creating a new SVG file, try to keep as close to the raster image as possible, and be sure to talk to the upstream developers about any deviations or changes you need to make.  And finally, keep with the spirit of open source and make your new image available to both Ubuntu and the upstream project under a copy-left license like the CC-BY-SA or another permissive license of the upstream’s preference.

3) Preparing your image

Since we are getting close to the release of 12.04, the requirements for any further changes are getting stricter.  In order to get your image into the Precise packages, you will need to meet the following two criteria:

It must be approved by the upstream project.  Since your image will be representing their application in Ubuntu, we absolutely need their acceptance of it before it can be used.  This is why step #1 is so vitally important, make sure you are working and communicating closely with upstream from the very beginning.

It must be a plain SVG file.  This is because it will be added as a patch file against the package, and patch files don’t work well with binary data.  Since a plain SVG file is text, not binary, it makes it much easier to convert into a patch.

4) Submit your new image

The wiki page containing the list of applications has a link to the corresponding bug report filed in Launchpad.  When your image is ready, attach it to the bug report.

You will also need to add the upstream project to the bug report.  Click the “Also affects project” link on the bug page, and choose the Launchpad Project that matches your upstream.

That’s it!  Well, almost.  Once we have your image, the application’s package in Ubuntu will need to be updated to use it, but that will require some changes to packaging scripts and patch files, which will be the subject of a more technical post.  But getting the necessary image is itself a big step.

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Michael Hall

Bazaar is a great tool for distributed development, but distros are built on packages, and so packages are what distro developer care about.  That’s why many of you who have followed my previous blogs have probably been asked for patches to the package itself, not to the bzr branch.

Why the difference?  Well for package maintainers, it’s easier and faster to import  upstream changes if they keep their source code clean.  To do that, any changes made by the distro are applied on top of the unmodified upstream code in the form of patches.  There are many tools designed specifically to make this easy for the package maintainers.

Below I’m going to show you how to turn your code change into a package patch that is easy for Ubuntu developers to add to the distro’s packages.  Only do this if your submitted branch is to a package in main and it hasn’t already been merged.

0) Check your source package format

The following instructions will only work on source packages using quilt 3.0 for managing patches.  Before you do anything else, check that the file debian/source/format contains the following:

3.0 (quilt)

 

1) Find your revisions

Starting from your existing code branch, we first need to identify which revisions in your branch we need to turn into a patch.  To do that, we simply check for revisions in your branch that don’t exist in the main one.  Here is what I used for geany:

bzr missing --mine-only ubuntu:geany

You just need to replace ‘geany’ with your application’s branch name (the same you bzr branched in my earlier articles).  The –mine-only will limit the result to only revisions in your branch just to keep things simple.  You’ll want to make note of the first and last revisions in this output.  If, like me, you only had one revision missing, that makes it even easier.

 

2) Generate the patch

Fortunately the package “bzr-builddeb” provides a command that makes this step easy.

mkdir -p debian/patches
bzr dep3-patch -d ubuntu:geany . > debian/patches/add_keywords.patch

Again, just replace ‘geany’ with your application’s branch name, and dep3-patch will find the differences in your branch and convert them into a patch file.

Now that you have a patch file, we need to add it to the list of patches for this package.  To do that, all you need is to add it’s name to the end of the debian/patches/series file like this:

echo add_keywords.patch >> debian/patches/series

 

3) Convert your source changes

Now that your changes are in a patch file, we need remove those changes from the source code itself.  This is where those revision numbers from step 1 come in, you will need the highest revision number and one less than the lowest.  Since I only had one revision, rev 32, my numbers are 32 and 31.

bzr diff -r 32..31 | bzr patch

This causes bzr to generate a reverse-diff of your changes (by going from the higher to the lower revision), and then apply that reverse-diff to your current code, effectively undoing your changes.

Now you need to apply your new patch file using quilt, so that quilt knows about it:

quilt push -a

Which should give you the following output if everything applies cleanly (if not, then your package is going to need some extra work, and you should ask for help from someone in #ubuntu-devel on freenode IRC).

Applying patch add_keywords.patch
patching file geany.desktop.in

Now at patch add_keywords.patch

 

4) Log your changes

Since you are making changes to the package itself now, you need to add that information to the debian/changelog:

export DEBFULLNAME="Michael Hall"
export DEBEMAIL="mhall119@ubuntu.com"
dch -i

You will, of course, want to replace my name and email with your own (Hint: you can put those 2 export lines into ~/.bashrc for future packaging work). This will create a new entry in the chanelog for you, with one higher version number.  All you need to do it add in the comments:

* Add search keywords to .desktop file (LP: #942154)

Be sure to use the proper bug number for your changes.  Also, if you are not running on Precise, you  will need to change the release target at the top of the file to ‘precise’.  Here’s what my new record looks like:

geany (0.21.dfsg-1ubuntu4) precise; urgency=low

* Add search keywords to .desktop file (LP: #942154)

-- Michael Hall <mhall119@ubuntu.com> Wed, 07 Mar 2012 14:40:32 -0500

 

5) Commit and push

Now it’s time to put everything back into your bzr branch.  First you need to add your patch file:

bzr add debian/patches/add_keywords.patch
bzr add debian/patches/series
bzr add .pc/

If your package branch didn’t already have a ‘series’ file, my instructions in step 2 will have created one, so I’m adding it here just in case.  If it already existed, bzr add won’t do anything.

Next, commit and push your changes back to your submitted branch:

bzr commit -m "Convert source changes into a package patch file"
bzr push lp:~mhall119/ubuntu/precise/geany/add_keywords

 

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