Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'phone'

Michael Hall

Will CookeThis is a guest post from Will Cooke, the new Desktop Team manager at Canonical. It’s being posted here while we work to get a blog setup on unity.ubuntu.com, which is where you can find out more about Unity 8 and how to get involved with it.

Intro

Understandably, most of the Ubuntu news recently has focused around phones. There is a lot of excitement and anticipation building around the imminent release of the first devices.  However, the Ubuntu Desktop has not been dormant during this time.  A lot of thought and planning has been given to what the desktop will become in the future; who will use it and what will they use it for.  All the work which is going in to the phone will be directly applicable to the desktop as well, since they will use the same code.  All the apps, the UI tweaks, everything which makes applications secure and stable will all directly apply to the desktop as well.  The plan is to have the single converged operating system ready for use on the desktop by 16.04.

The plan

We learned some lessons during the early development of Unity 7. Here’s what happened:

  • 11.04: New Unity as default
  • 11.10: New Unity version
  • 12.04: Unity in First LTS

What we’ve decided to do this time is to keep the same, stable Unity 7 desktop as the default while we offer users who want to opt-in to Unity8 an option to use that desktop. As development continues the Unity 8 desktop will get better and better.  It will benefit from a lot of the advances which have come about through the development of the phone OS and will benefit from continual improvements as the releases happen.

  • 14.04 LTS: Unity 7 default / Unity 8 option for the first time
  • 14.10: Unity 7 default / Unity 8 new rev as an option
  • 15.04: Unity 7 default / Unity 8 new rev as an option
  • 15.10: Potentially Unity 8 default / Unity 7 as an option
  • 16.04 LTS: Unity 8 default / Unity 7 as an option

As you can see, this gives us a full 2 cycles (in addition to the one we’ve already done) to really nail Unity 8 with the level of quality that people expect. So what do we have?

How will we deliver Unity 8 with better quality than 7?

Continuous Integration is the best way for us to achieve and maintain the highest quality possible.  We have put a lot of effort in to automating as much of the testing as we can, the best testing is that which is performed easily.  Before every commit the changes get reviewed and approved – this is the first line of defense against bugs.  Every merge request triggers a run of the tests, the second line of defense against bugs and regressions – if a change broke something we find out about it before it gets in to the build.

The CI process builds everything in a “silo”, a self contained & controlled environment where we find out if everything works together before finally landing in the image.

And finally, we have a large number of tests which run against those images. This really is a “belt and braces” approach to software quality and it all happens automatically.  You can see, we are taking the quality of our software very seriously.

What about Unity 7?

Unity 7 and Compiz have a team dedicated to maintenance and bug fixes and so the quality of it continues to improve with every release.  For example; windows switching workspaces when a monitor gets unplugged is fixed, if you have a mouse with 6 buttons it works, support for the new version of Metacity (incase you want to use the Gnome2 desktop) – added (and incidentally, a lot of that work was done by a community contributor – thanks Alberts!)

Unity 7 is the desktop environment for a lot of software developers, devops gurus, cloud platform managers and millions of users who rely on it to help them with their everyday computing.  We don’t want to stop you being able to get work done.  This is why we continue to maintain Unity 7 while we develop Unity 8.  If you want to take Unity 8 for a spin and see how its coming along then you can; if you want to get your work done, we’re making that experience better for you every day.  Best of all, both of these options are available to you with no detriment to the other.

Things that we’re getting in the new Ubuntu Desktop

  1. Applications decoupled from the OS updates.  Traditionally a given release of Ubuntu has shipped with the versions of the applications available at the time of release.  Important updates and security fixes are back-ported to older releases where required, but generally you had to wait for the next release to get the latest and greatest set of applications.  The new desktop packaging system means that application developers can push updates out when they are ready and the user can benefit right away.
  2. Application isolation.  Traditionally applications can access anything the user can access; photos, documents, hardware devices, etc.  On other platforms this has led to data being stolen or rendered otherwise unusable.  Isolation means that without explicit permission any Click packaged application is prevented from accessing data you don’t want it to access.
  3. A full SDK for writing Ubuntu apps.  The SDK which many people are already using to write apps for the phone will allow you to write apps for the desktop as well.  In fact, your apps will be write once run anywhere – you don’t need to write a “desktop” app or a “phone” app, just an Ubuntu app.

What we have now

The easiest way to try out the Unity 8 Desktop Preview is to use the daily Ubuntu Desktop Next live image:   http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-desktop-next/daily-live/current/   This will allow you to boot into a Unity 8 session without touching your current installation.  An easy 10 step way to write this image to a USB stick is:

  1. Download the ISO
  2. Insert your USB stick in the knowledge that it’s going to get wiped
  3. Open the “Disks” application
  4. Choose your USB stick and click on the cog icon on the righthand side
  5. Choose “Restore Disk Image”
  6. Browse to and select the ISO you downloaded in #1
  7. Click “Start restoring”
  8. Wait
  9. Boot and select “Try Ubuntu….”
  10. Done *

* Please note – there is currently a bug affecting the Unity 8 greeter which means you are not automatically logged in when you boot the live image.  To log in you need to:

  1. Switch to vt1 (ctrl-alt-f1)
  2. type “passwd” and press enter
  3. press enter again to set the current password to blank
  4. enter a new password twice
  5. Check that the password has been successfully changed
  6. Switch back to vt7 (ctrl-alt-f7)
  7. Enter the new password to login

 

Here are some screenshots showing what Unity 8 currently looks like on the desktop:

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The team

The people working on the new desktop are made up of a few different disciplines.  We have a team dedicated to Unity 7 maintenance and bug fixes who are also responsible for Unity 8 on the desktop and feed in a lot of support to the main Unity 8 & Mir teams. We have the Ubuntu Desktop team who are responsible for many aspects of the underlying technologies used such as GNOME libraries, settings, printing etc as well as the key desktop applications such as Libreoffice and Chromium.  The Ubuntu desktop team has some of the longest serving members of the Ubuntu family, with some people having been here for the best part of ten years.

How you can help

We need to log all the bugs which need to be fixed in order to make Unity 8 the best desktop there is.  Firstly, we need people to test the images and log bugs.  If developers want to help fix those bugs, so much the better.  Right now we are focusing on identifying where the work done for the phone doesn’t work as expected on the desktop.  Once those bugs are logged and fixed we can rely on the CI system described above to make sure that they stay fixed.

Link to daily ISOs:  http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-desktop-next/daily-live/current/

Bugs:  https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/unity8-desktop-session

IRC:  #ubuntu-desktop on Freenode

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Michael Hall

screenshot_1.0So it’s finally happened, one of my first Ubuntu SDK apps has reached an official 1.0 release. And I think we all know what that means. Yup, it’s time to scrap the code and start over.

It’s a well established mantra, codified by Fred Brooks, in software development that you will end up throwing away the first attempt at a new project. The releases between 0.1 and 0.9 are a written history of your education about the problem, the tools, or the language you are learning. And learn I did, I wrote a whole series of posts about my adventures in writing uReadIt. Now it’s time to put all of that learning to good use.

Often times projects still spend an extremely long time in this 0.x stage, getting ever closer but never reaching that 1.0 release.  This isn’t because they think 1.0 should wait until the codebase is perfect, I don’t think anybody expects 1.0 to be perfect. 1.0 isn’t the milestone of success, it’s the crossing of the Rubicon, the point where drastic change becomes inevitable. It’s the milestone where the old code, with all it’s faults, dies, and out of it is born a new codebase.

So now I’m going to start on uReadIt 2.0, starting fresh, with the latest Ubuntu UI Toolkit and platform APIs. It won’t be just a feature-for-feature rewrite either, I plan to make this a great Reddit client for both the phone and desktop user. To that end, I plan to add the following:

  • A full Javascript library for interacting with the Reddit API
  • User account support, which additionally will allow:
    • Posting articles & comments
    • Reading messages in your inbox
    • Upvoting and downvoting articles and comments
  • Convergence from the start, so it’s usable on the desktop as well
  • Re-introduce link sharing via Content-Hub
  • Take advantage of new features in the UITK such as UbuntuListView filtering & pull-to-refresh, and left/right swipe gestures on ListItems

Another change, which I talked about in a previous post, will be to the license of the application. Where uReadIt 1.0 is GPLv3, the next release will be under a BSD license.

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Michael Hall

I’ve just finished the last day of a week long sprint for Ubuntu application development. There were many people here, designers, SDK developers, QA folks and, which excited me the most, several of the Core Apps developers from our community!

image20140520_0048I haven’t been in attendance at many conferences over the past couple of years, and without an in-person UDS I haven’t had a chance to meetup and hangout with anybody outside of my own local community. So this was a very nice treat for me personally to spend the week with such awesome and inspiring contributors.

It wasn’t a vacation though, sprints are lots of work, more work than UDS.  All of us were jumping back and forth between high information density discussions on how to implement things, and then diving into some long heads-down work to get as much implemented as we could. It was intense, and now we’re all quite tired, but we all worked together well.

I was particularly pleased to see the community guys jumping right in and thriving in what could have very easily been an overwhelming event. Not only did they all accomplish a lot of work, fix a lot of bugs, and implement some new features, but they also gave invaluable feedback to the developers of the toolkit and tools. They never cease to amaze me with their talent and commitment.

It was a little bitter-sweet though, as this was also the last sprint with Jono at the head of the community team.  As most of you know, Jono is leaving Canonical to join the XPrize foundation.  It is an exciting opportunity to be sure, but his experience and his insights will be sorely missed by the rest of us. More importantly though he is a friend to so many of us, and while we are sad to see him leave, we wish him all the best and can’t wait to hear about the things he will be doing in the future.

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Michael Hall

Bicentennial Man PosterEver since we started building the Ubuntu SDK, we’ve been trying to find ways of bringing the vast number of Android apps that exist over to Ubuntu. As with any new platform, there’s a chasm between Android apps and native apps that can only be crossed through the effort of porting.

There are simple solutions, of course, like providing an Android runtime on Ubuntu. On other platforms, those have shown to present Android apps as second-class citizens that can’t benefit from a new platform’s unique features. Worse, they don’t provide a way for apps to gradually become first-class citizens, so chasm between Android and native still exists, which means the vast majority of apps supported this way will never improve.

There are also complicates solutions, like code conversion, that try to translate Android/Java code into the native platform’s language and toolkit, preserving logic and structure along the way. But doing this right becomes such a monumental task that making a tool to do it is virtually impossible, and the amount of cleanup and checking needed to be done by an actual developer quickly rises to the same level of effort as a manual port would have. This approach also fails to take advantage of differences in the platforms, and will re-create the old way of doing things even when it doesn’t make sense on the new platform.

Screenshot from 2014-04-19 14:44:22NDR takes a different approach to these, it doesn’t let you run our Android code on Ubuntu, nor does it try to convert your Android code to native code. Instead NDR will re-create the general framework of your Android app as a native Ubuntu app, converting Activities to Pages, for example, to give you a skeleton project on which you can build your port. It won’t get you over the chasm, but it’ll show you the path to take and give you a head start on it. You will just need to fill it in with the logic code to make it behave like your Android app. NDR won’t provide any of logic for you, and chances are you’ll want to do it slightly differently than you did in Android anyway, due to the differences between the two platforms.

Screenshot from 2014-04-19 14:44:31To test NDR during development, I chose the Telegram app because it was open source, popular, and largely used Android’s layout definitions and components. NDR will be less useful against apps such as games, that use their own UI components and draw directly to a canvas, but it’s pretty good at converting apps that use Android’s components and UI builder.

After only a couple days of hacking I was able to get NDR to generate enough of an Ubuntu SDK application that, with a little bit of manual cleanup, it was recognizably similar to the Android app’s.

This proves, in my opinion, that bootstrapping an Ubuntu port based on Android source code is not only possible, but is a viable way of supporting Android app developers who want to cross that chasm and target their apps for Ubuntu as well. I hope it will open the door for high-quality, native Ubuntu app ports from the Android ecosystem.  There is still much more NDR can do to make this easier, and having people with more Android experience than me (that would be none) would certainly make it a more powerful tool, so I’m making it a public, open source project on Launchpad and am inviting anybody who has an interest in this to help me improve it.

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Michael Hall

I’ve been using Ubuntu on my only phone for over six months now, and I’ve been loving it. But all this time it’s been missing something, something I couldn’t quite put my finger on. Then, Saturday night, it finally hit me, it’s missing the community.

That’s not to say that the community isn’t involved in building it, all of the core apps have been community developed, as have several parts of our toolkit and even the platform itself. Everything about Ubuntu for phones is open source and open to the community.

But the community wasn’t on my phone. Their work was, but not the people.  I have Facebook and Google+ and Twitter, sure, but everybody is on those, and you have to either follow or friend people there to see anything from them. I wanted something that put the community of Ubuntu phone users, on my Ubuntu phone. So, I started to make one.

Community Cast

Community Cast is a very simple, very basic, public message broadcasting service for Ubuntu. It’s not instant messaging, or social networking. It doesn’t to chat rooms or groups. It isn’t secure, at all.  It does just one thing, it lets you send a short message to everybody else who uses it. It’s a place to say hello to other users of Ubuntu phone (or tablet).  That’s it, that’s all.

As I mentioned at the start, I only realized what I wanted Saturday night, but after spending just a few hours on it, I’ve managed to get a barely functional client and server, which I’m making available now to anybody who wants to help build it.

Server

The server piece is a very small Django app, with a single BroadcastMessage data model, and the Django Rest Framework that allows you to list and post messages via JSON. To keep things simple, it doesn’t do any authentication yet, so it’s certainly not ready for any kind of production use.  I would like it to get Ubuntu One authentication information from the client, but I’m still working out how to do that.  I threw this very basic server up on our internal testing OpenStack cloud already, but it’s running the built-in http server and an sqlite3 database, so if it slows to a crawl or stops working don’t be surprised.  Like I said, it’s not production ready.  But if you want to help me get it there, you can get the code with bzr branch lp:~mhall119/+junk/communitycast-server, then just run syncdb and runserver to start it.

Client

The client is just as simple and unfinished as the server (I’ve only put a few hours into them both combined, remember?), but it’s enough to use. Again there’s no authentication, so anybody with the client code can post to my server, but I want to use the Ubuntu Online Accounts to authenticate a user via their Ubuntu One account. There’s also no automatic updating, you have to press the refresh button in the toolbar to check for new messages. But it works. You can get the code for it with bzr branch lp:~mhall119/+junk/communitycast-client and it will by default connect to my test instance.  If you want to run your own server, you can change the baseUrl property on the MessageListModel to point to your local (or remote) server.

Screenshots

There isn’t much to show, but here’s what it looks like right now.  I hope that there’s enough interest from others to get some better designs for the client and help implementing them and filling out the rest of the features on both the client and server.

communitycast-client-1communitycast-client-2communitycast-client-3

Not bad for a few hours of work.  I have a functional client and server, with the server even deployed to the cloud. Developing for Ubuntu is proving to be extremely fast and easy.

 

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Michael Hall

Screenshot from 2014-03-20 21:57:06Yesterday we made a big step towards developing a native email client for Ubuntu, which uses the Ubuntu UI Toolkit and will converge between between phones, tablets and the desktop from the start.

We’re not starting from scratch though, we’re building on top of the incredible work done in the Trojitá project.  Trojitá provides a fast, light email client built with Qt, which made it ideal for using with Ubuntu. And yesterday, the first of that work was accepted into upstream, you can now build an Ubuntu Components front end to Trojitá.

None of this would have been possible without the help up Trojitá’s upstream developer Jan Kundrát, who patiently helped me learn the codebase, and also the basics of CMake and Git so that I could make this first contribution. It also wouldn’t have been possible without the existing work by Ken VanDine and Joseph Mills, who both worked on the build configuration and some initial QML code that I used. Thanks also to Dan Chapman for working together with me to get this contribution into shape and accepted upstream.

This is just the start, now comes the hard work of actually building the new UI with the Ubuntu UI Toolkit.  Andrea Del Sarto has provided some fantastic UI mockups already which we can use as a start, but there’s still a need for a more detailed visual and UX design.  If you want to be part of that work, I’ve documented how to get the code and how to contribute on the EmailClient wiki.  You can also join the next IRC meeting at 1400 UTC today in #ubuntu-touch-meeting on Freenode.

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Michael Hall

Starting at 1400 UTC today, and continuing all week long, we will be hosting a series of online classes covering many aspects of Ubuntu application development. We have experts both from Canonical and our always amazing community who will be discussing the Ubuntu SDK, QML and HTML5 development, as well as the new Click packaging and app store.

You can find the full schedule here: http://summit.ubuntu.com/appdevweek-1403/

We’re using a new format for this year’s app developer week.  As you can tell from the link above, we’re using the Summit website.  It will work much like the virtual UDS, where each session will have a page containing an embedded YouTube video that will stream the presenter’s hangout, an embedded IRC chat window that will log you into the correct channel, and an Etherpad document where the presenter can post code examples, notes, or any other text.

Use the chatroom like you would an Ubuntu On Air session, start your questions with “QUESTION:” and wait for the presenter to get to it. After the session is over, the recorded video will be available on that page for you to replay later. If you register yourself as attending on the website (requires a Launchpad profile), you can mark yourself as attending those sessions you are interested in, and Summit can then give you a personalize schedule as well as an ical feed you can subscribe to in your calendar.

If you want to use the embedded Etherpad, make sure you’re a member of https://launchpad.net/~ubuntu-etherpad

That’s it!  Enjoy the session, ask good questions, help others when you can, and happy hacking.

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Michael Hall

Today we announced the start of the next Ubuntu App Showdown, and I have very high hopes for the kinds of apps we’ll see this time around. Our SDK has grown by leaps and bounds since the last one, and so much more is possible now. So go get yourself started now: http://developer.ubuntu.com/apps/

Earlier today Jono posted his Top 5 Dream Ubuntu Apps, and they all sound great.  I don’t have any specific apps I’d like to see, but I would love to get some multi-player games.  Nothing fancy, nothing 3D or FPS.  Think more like Draw Something or Words With Friends, something casual, turn-based, that lets me connect with other Ubuntu device users. A clone of one of those would be fun, but let’s try and come up with something original, something unique to Ubuntu.

What do you say, got any good ideas?  If you do, post them in the App Showdown subreddit or our Google+ App Developers community and let’s make it happen.

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Michael Hall

There’s been a lot of talk about Ubuntu’s phone and tablet development over the last year, and it’s great that it’s getting so much attention, but people have been getting the name of it all wrong. Now, to be fair, this is a problem entirely of our own making, we started off talking about the phone (and later tablet) developments as “Ubuntu Touch”, and put most of the information about on our wiki under a page named Touch.  But there is no Ubuntu Touch! It’s not a separate OS or platform, there is only one OS and it’s simply called Ubuntu.

Ubuntu 14.04 Stack

What people are referring to when they say Touch or Ubuntu Touch, is really just Ubuntu with Unity 8.  Other than the shell (and display server that powers it), it’s the same OS as you get on your desktop.

Everything under the hood is the same: same tools, same filesystem, even the same version of them, because it’s all built from the same source. Calendar data is stored in the same place, audio and video is played through the same system, even the Unity APIs are shared between desktop and phone.

So why is the name important?  Not only is it more accurate to call them both Ubuntu, it’s also one of the (in my opinion) most exciting things about having an Ubuntu phone.  You’re not getting a stripped down embedded Linux OS, or something so customized for phones that it’s useless on your desktop.  You’re getting a fully featured, universal operating system, one that can do everything you need from a phone and everything you need from a desktop.

Future Ubuntu Stack

This is the key to Ubuntu’s convergence strategy, something that nobody else has right now. Android makes a terrible desktop OS.  So does iOS.  Chrome OS won’t work for a phone either, nor OSX. Even Microsoft has built two different platforms for mobile and desktop, even if they’ve slapped the same interface on both.

But with Ubuntu, once Unity 8 comes to the desktop, you will have the same OS, the same platform, on all of your devices. And while you will run the same version of Unity on both, Unity 8 is smart enough to change how it looks and how it works to meet the needs and capabilities of what you’re running it on.  Better still, Unity will be able to make these changes at run time, so if you dock your convertible tablet to a keyboard, it will automatically switch from giving you a tablet interface to a desktop interface. All of your running apps keep running, but thanks to the Ubuntu SDK those too will automatically adjust to work as desktop apps.

So while “Ubuntu Touch” may have been a useful distinction in the beginning, it isn’t anymore.  Instead, if you need to differentiate between desktop and mobile versions of Ubuntu, you should refer to “Unity 8″ if talking about the interface, or “Ubuntu for phones” (or tablet) if you’re talking about device images or hardware enablement. And if you’re a developer and you are talking about the platform APIs or capabilities, you’re talking about the “Ubuntu SDK”, which is already available on both desktop and mobile installs of Ubuntu.

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Michael Hall

It may surprise some of you (not really) to learn that in addition to being a software geek, I’m also a sci-fi nerd. One of my current guilty pleasures is the British Sci-Fi hit Doctor Who. I’m not alone in this, I know many of you reading this are fans of the show too.  Many of my friends from outside the floss-o-sphere are, and some of them record a weekly podcast on the subject.

Tonight one of them was over at my house for dinner, and I was reminded of Stuart Langridge’s post about making a Bad Voltage app and how he had a GenericPodcastApp component that provided common functionality with a clean separation from the rest of his app. So I decided to see how easy it would be to make a DWO Whocast app with it.  Turns out, it was incredibly easy.

Here are the steps I took:

  1. Create a new project in QtCreator
  2. Download Stuart’s GenericPodcastApp.qml into my project’s ./components/ folder
  3. Replace the template’s Page components with GenericPodcastApp
  4. Customize the necessary fields
  5. Add a nice icon and Suru-style gradients for good measure

That’s it! All told it took my less than 10 minutes to put the app together, test it, show it off, and submit my Click package to the store.  And the app doesn’t look half bad either.  Think about that, 10 minutes to get from an idea to the store.  It would have been available to download too if automatic reviews were working in the store (coming soon).

That’s the power of the Ubuntu SDK. What can you do with it in 10 minutes?

Update: Before this was even published this morning the app was reviewed, approved, and available in the store.  You can download it now on your Ubuntu phone or tablet.

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Michael Hall

Yesterday, in a conference call with the press followed immediately by a public Town Hall with the community, Canonical announced the first two hardware manufacturers who are going to ship Ubuntu on smartphones!

Now many have speculated on why we think we can succeed where so many giants have failed.  It’s a question we see quite a bit, actually.  If Microsoft, RIM/Blackberry and HP all failed, what makes us think we can succeed?  It’s simple math, really.  We’re small.  Yeah, that’s it, we’re just small.

Unlike those giants who tried and failed, we don’t need to dominate the market to be successful. Even just 1% of the market would be enough to sustain and continue the development of Ubuntu for phones, and probably help cover the cost of developing it for desktops too.  The server side is already paying for itself.  Because we’re small and diversified, we don’t need to win big in order to win at all.  And 1%, that’s a very reachable target.

 

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Michael Hall

Last month I announced a contest to win a new OPPO Find 5 by porting Ubuntu Touch to it.  Today I’m pleased to announce that we have a winner!

Below is a picture tour of what Ubuntu Touch running on the device, along with descriptions of what works and what doesn’t. If you’re impatient, you can find links to download the images and instructions for flashing them here.

First a disclaimer, these aren’t professional pictures.  They were taken with my Nexus 4, also running Ubuntu Touch, and the colors are slightly shifted horizontally for some reason.  I didn’t notice it until I had already gone through and taken 58 pictures and downloaded them to my laptop.  Apologies for that.  But you can still get a feel for it, so let’s carry on!

Edge Swiping

The touch screen and edge swiping worked perfectly, as was neatly demonstrated by going through the new introduction tour.

Dash & Launcher

The Dash also works exactly as expected.  This build has a low enough pixel/grid-unit, and high enough resolution, that it fits 4 icons per row, the same as you get on Asus Nexus 4. The icons on the Launcher felt a little small, but everything there worked perfectly too.

Indicators

The indicators were missing some functionality, which I assume is a result of Ubuntu Touch not working with all of the Find 5′s hardware.  Specifically the WiFi isn’t working, so you don’t see anything for it in the Network indicator, and the screen brightness slider was non-functional in the Battery indicator.  Sound, however, worked perfectly.

Apps

Not having WiFi limited the number of apps I could play with, but most of the ones I could try worked fine.  Sudoku and Dropping letters don’t work for some reason, but the Core Apps (except Weather, which requires network access) worked fine.

 

Hardware

As I already mentioned, WiFi doesn’t work on this build, nor does screen brightness.  The camera, however, is a different story. Both the front and back cameras worked, including the flash on the back.

Final Thoughts

While this build didn’t meet all the criteria I had initially set out, it did so much more than any other image I had received up until now that I am happy to call it the winner.  The developer who built it has also committed to continuing his porting work, and getting the remaining items working.  I hope that having this Find 5 will help him in that work, and so all Find 5 owners will have the chance to run Ubuntu Touch on their device.

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Michael Hall

Do you want a new OPPO Find 5?  Of course you do!  Well the awesome team at OPPO have given us a brand new Find 5 (x909 to be exact) for us to give you.  So here’s the deal, the first person to provide a working Ubuntu Touch image for this device gets to keep it.

Last weekend both Ubuntu and OPPO had booths at the first ever XDA Developers Conference in Miami.  While discussing both of our new products, the idea came up to hold a porting contest to get Ubuntu Touch running on the Find 5.  Jono announced the initial contest during his presentation on Saturday, with an initial challenge to have a winner claim the prize during the conference itself.  Despite having three separate developers build images and flash them onto the phone, none were able to boot into Ubuntu Touch.

So now we’re extending the contest and making it available to everybody!  To enter, you will need to send me an email containing links to the necessary files and detailed step-by-step direction for loading them on the phone.  I don’t have much experience with flashing ROMs, so treat me like a complete newbie when writing your instructions.  If your images don’t work, I will send you the output from adb logcat as well as any other information you request.  If your images do work, and meet the requirements below, I’ll be asking for a mailing address so I can send you your prize!

In order to win your phone, you need to get Ubuntu Touch running on the OPPO Find 5. Not just booting, but running, and is a way that makes it usable for other Find 5 owners.  So I’ve set out the following things that I will be checking for:

  • The phone boots into Ubuntu Touch (obviously)
  • I can launch multiple apps and switch between them
  • I can make phone calls (I have a SIM that works)
  • I can send and receive SMS
  • I can connect to Wifi, using WPA2
  • The screen goes to sleep when pressing the power button or after the set timeout period, and wakes up again when pressing the power button
  • I can play audio with the Music app
  • I can take pictures with the front and rear cameras

So, you want to take a crack at it?  Well the first step is to read the Ubuntu Touch Porting Guide.  Once you have an image you want me to try, send an email to mhall119@gmail.com with “OPPO” somewhere in the subject (just to help me out, I get a lot of email).  In that email include all of the steps necessary to download and install your image.  Again, be detailed, I’m a newb.  If you image meets the above requirements, I’ll put it in the mail to you!  After that, we can work on getting your image available for easy installation via our phablet-flash tool, so all the other OPPO Find 5 owners can try it too.

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Michael Hall

When we announced the Ubuntu Edge crowd-funding campaign a week ago, we had one hell of a good first day.  We broke records left and right, we sold out of the first round of perks in half the time we expected, and we put the campaign well above the red line we needed to reach our goal.  Our second day was also amazing, and when we opened up a new round of perks at a heavy discount the third day we got another big boost.

But as exciting and record-breaking as that first week was, we couldn’t escape the inevitable slowdown that the Kickstarter folks call “the trough“.  Our funding didn’t stop, you guys never stopped, but it certainly slowed way down from it’s peak.  We’ve now entered a period of the crowd-funding cycle where keeping momentum going is the most important thing. How well we do that will determine whether or not we’re close enough to our goal for the typical end-of-cycle peak to push us over the edge.

And this is where we need our community more than ever, not for your money but for your ideas and your passion.  If you haven’t contributed to the campaign yet, what can we offer that would make it worthwhile for you?  If your friends haven’t contributed yet, what would it take to make them interested?  We want to know what perks to offer to help drive us through the trough and closer to the Edge.

Our Options

So here’s what we have to work with.  We need to raise about $24 million by the end of August 21st.  That’s a lot, but if we break it down by orders of magnitude we get the following combinations:

  • 1,000,000 people giving $24 each
  • 100,000 people giving $240 each
  • 10,000 people giving $2,400 each
  • 1,000 people giving $24,000 each

Now finding ways to get people to contribute $24 are easy, but a million people is a lot of people.  1,000 or even 10,000 people isn’t that many, but finding things that they’ll part with $2,400 for is challenge, even more so for $24,000.

That leaves us with one order of magnitude that I think makes sense. 100,000 people is a lot, but not unreasonable.  Previously large crowd-funding campaigns have reached 90,000 contributors, while raising only a fraction of what we’re trying for, so that many people is an attainable goal.  Plus $240, while more than an impulse purchase, still isn’t an unreasonable amount for a lot of people to part with, especially if we’re giving them something of similar real value in return.

Now it doesn’t have to be exactly $240, but think of perk ideas that would be around this level, something less than the cost of a phone, but more than the Founder levels.

Our Limits

Now, for the limitations we have.  I know everybody wants to see $600 phones again, and that would certainly be an easy way to boost the campaign.  But the manufacturing estimate we have is that $32 million will build only 40,000 phones.  That’s $800 per phone.  That’s something we can’t get away from.  Whatever we offer as perks, we have to average at least $800 per phone.  We were able to offer perks for less than that because we projected the other perk levels to help make up the difference.  So if you’re going to suggest a lower-priced phone perk, you’re going to have to offer some way to make up the difference.

You also need to consider the cost of offering the perk, as a $50 t-shirt doesn’t actually net $50 once you take out the cost of the shirt itself, so we can’t offer $240 worth of merchandise in exchange for a $240 contribution. But you could probably offer something that costs $20 to make in exchange for a $240 contribution.

Our Challenge

So there’s the challenge for you guys.  I’ve been thinking of this for over a week now, and have offered my ideas to those managing the campaign.  Often they pointed out some flaw in my reasoning or estimates, but some ideas they liked and might try to offer.  I can’t promise that your ideas will be offered, but I can promise to put them in front of the people making those decisions, and they are interested in hearing from you.

Now, rather than trying to cultivate your ideas here on my blog, because comments are a terrible place for something like that, I’ve created a Reddit thread for you.  Post your ideas there as comments, upvote the ones you think are good, downvote the ones you don’t think are possible, leave comments and suggestions to help refine the ideas.  I will let those running the campaign know about the thread, and I will also be taking the most popular (and possible) ideas and emailing them to the decision makers directly.

We have a long way to go to reach $32 million, but it’s still within our reach.  With your ideas, and your help, we will make it to the Edge.

Reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/Ubuntu/comments/1jqyas/submit_your_ubuntu_edge_campaign_perk_ideas_here/

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Michael Hall

This is it, the final day of the Ubuntu Core Apps Hack Days!  It’s been a long but very productive run, and it doesn’t mean the end of your chance to participate.  You can always find us in #ubuntu-app-devel on Freenode IRC, and for today either myself (mhall119) or Alan Pope (popey) will be at your beck and call from 9am to 9pm to help you get setup and started working on the Core Apps.

The last of the Core Apps, and the one we will be focusing on today, is the Stock Ticker. Originally developed by independent developer Robert Steckroth, we recently invited the Stock Ticker into the Core Apps project where we have been focused on refining the UI and setting it up for automated testing.  Feature wise, the Stock Ticker was already dogfoodable when we brought it under the Core Apps umbrella:

  • Search for stocks. DONE!
  • Add stocks to your portfolio. DONE!
  • Browse current stock prices. DONE!
  • Browse stock information. DONE!

For the UI we asked community designer Lucas Romero Di Benedetto to produce some new visual designs for us, which are looking incredible!  But it’s going to take a lot of work to implement them all, so we really need some more developers, especially those who know their way around QML, to help us with this.

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Michael Hall

We only have 2 days left in the Ubuntu Core Apps Hack Days!  I hope everybody who has participated has enjoyed it and found it informative and helpful.  If you haven’t participated yet, it’s not too late!  Come join us in #ubuntu-app-devel on Freenode’s IRC network anytime from 9am to 9pm UTC and ping either myself (mhall119) or Alan Pope (popey) and we’ll help you get setup and show you where you can start contributing to the Core Apps.

Mmmmmm, Pie....Today we get another chance to play while we work, because the focus is going to be on Dropping Letters, a simple, fun, yet surprisingly addictive little app written by Stuart Langridge.  Stuart has since handed off development of the app to others, but not before having it already in perfectly usable state.  Because of it’s simplicity, our list of dogfooding requirements wasn’t very long:

  • Start a new game. DONE!
  • View high scores.

Short as the list may be, it’s only half done!  We still need to integrate a high scores screen, which means we need you Javascript and QML developers!  Dropping Letters also needs to be tested, which means Autopilot, which of course means we have something for you Python hackers too!  So come and join us today in #ubuntu-app-devel and help make this great game even better.

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Michael Hall

So you may have heard (seriously, how could you not?) that Canonical is crowd-funding a showcase phone called Ubuntu Edge.  This is very exciting for a number of reasons, which I will get to below, but first go look at the Indie GoGo campaign page to see what I’m talking about.

Back? Good.  Did you contribute?  For the first 24 hours you can get a phone for a highly discounted contribution of $600 USD, rather than the $830 USD it will cost you tomorrow, so if you really want one of these it’s best to put your money on the table now.

Hardware Innovation

The phone hardware is impressive on it’s own, with more CPU, RAM and storage space than the laptop I was using for daily work last year.  Not only that, but it’s going to feature advances in the glass and battery that I haven’t seen on other phones.  Sapphire crystal glass, which can only be scratched by diamond, will keep your screen looking brand new for years to come.  And the silicon-anode battery promises faster charging and longer runtime without increasing the size of the handset.  You can see the full spec list on our other announcements.

I like this because we’re not asking you to contribute to making just another ordinary phone like all the rest you can buy already.  Instead we’re pushing the envelope to pioneer a new class of convergent superphones, a market that Ubuntu is uniquely positioned for.  This hardware will run Ubuntu Touch, Ubuntu for Android, and (when docked) a full Ubuntu Desktop.  But we’re not just playing the “make it bigger, make it faster” game, the design of Ubuntu Edge’s hardware is deliberate, everything choice was made based on what would provide the best user experience, what would make the edge-swipe gestures easy and responsive, what would let us show more of an app’s content while still fitting into the palm of the user’s hand.  This is a device designed from top to bottom for Ubuntu.

The margin on most production phones is thin enough to see though, which means that an OEM can’t afford to take risks with emerging technology or markets.  That’s why it’s so important that we prove both the capabilities of Ubuntu for convergence, and the consumer appeal for such a device.  Apple had to do it with the original iPhone, Google does it with their Nexus line of devices, and now it’s our turn to show what’s possible.

Community Campaign

Instead of seeking private capital to build these phones, then trying to sell them (at a profit or loss), we’ve decided to take it directly to the user community, which is why we’re asking you to pledge some amount to our campaign.  We couldn’t build Ubuntu without our community, and we can’t build Ubuntu Edge without you either.

Our target goal is $32 million, which sounds like a lot, but only because it is.  It really is.  But it’s still only a fraction of the cost of an actual production line of phones.  In order for an OEM to ship an Ubuntu phone (or any new phone), they would typically invest multiple times this amount.  So as big as our target goal is, and I don’t think anybody’s crowd-sourced more, it’s certainly not an unreasonable amount for what we’re offering.

The target amount will allow us to manufacture just 40,000 handsets, most of which I would imagine will already be claimed by those contributing $830 or more (only $600 if you do it the first day!).  All of the money raised in this campaign will go directly towards manufacturing and shipping these devices, it won’t be used for other Canonical business or even future Ubuntu development.  When you do the math, which I did, you see that it comes out to $800 per device to manufacture, and we’re only asking for $830 to get it (again, in the first 24 hours, you can get it below that cost).  This is an effort to build a new class of superphone, not a way of making Canonical rich.  If we reach our goal, you should have your Ubuntu Edge in hand sometime in May 2014!

Non-monetary contributions

I know that $830 is a lot of money, even $600 is a lot of money, but those aren’t the only ways you can help.  In addition to giving smaller amounts in support of this campaign (for which there are other perks) you can help make it a success by spreading the word.  No doubt it will be picked up by the usual online news sources, forums and blogs but let’s break it out of our usual Linux/FLOSS sphere.

So share links to the Indie GoGo campaign page on Facebook, Twitter and Google+.  Tell your friends, especially any tech savvy ones, about it.  Send an email to your local newspaper, radio or television stations, you never know who might think it’s an interesting story (and wouldn’t you just love to see Ubuntu on TV?).  Every person you tell about the campaign brings us one step closer to reaching our goal, and it doesn’t cost you a penny.

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Michael Hall

The excitement around the Ubuntu SDK and application development is still going strong, both on the Ubuntu Touch Core Apps side and with independent developers. So strong, in fact, that it’s time for another round of updates and spotlights on the work being done.

Core Apps in the Touch Preview

Some big news on the Core Apps side is that they are now being reviewed for inclusion in the daily Ubuntu Touch Preview images being developed by Canonical for the Nexus family of devices, and by community porters to a growing number of others.

Now that all of the Core Apps are being regularly built and packaged in the Core Apps PPA, they can be easily installed on desktops or devices.  And, after being reviewed by the team building the Ubuntu Touch Preview images, three of them have been selected to be part of the default installed application set. So please join me in congratulating the developers who work to them.

For the Calendar, Frank MertensKunal Parmar and Mario Boikov have done a fantastic job implementing the unique design interactions that were defined by Canonical’s design team.  For the Calculator, Dalius DobravolskasRiccardo Ferrazzo and Riccardo Padovani were able to quickly build something that is not only functional, but offers unique features that set it apart from other standard calculators.  Finally, the Clock app, where Juha Ristolainen, Nick Leppänen LarssonNekhelesh Ramananthan and Alessandro Pozzi have put together a visually stunning, multi-faceted application that I just can’t get enough of.

New Independent App Development

In addition to the work happening on the Core Apps, there has been a continuous development by independent app developers on their own projects.

LoadShedding

Load shedding (or rolling blackouts) are a way for electricity utilities to avoid being overloaded by energy demands at peak times.  This an be an inconvenience, to say the least, especially if you don’t know it’s coming.  Maybe that’s why developer razor created this LoadShedding schedule app.

Multi-Convert

Multi-Convert was originally an Android application, written in HTML5, that is now being ported to Ubuntu.  Multi-Convert allows real-time conversion of weight, length, area, volume and temperature between different standard units.

 TV Remotes

I ran across not one, but two different apps for the remote control of home-theater-PCs, bringing the promise of your mobile phone as a “second screen” to Ubuntu Touch.

First is Joseph Mills (who also created a Weather app featured in the first of these roundups), with a remote control for MythTV:

And if you’re an XBMC user instead, not to worry, because Michael Zanetti has you covered with his remote control for XBMC:

CatchPodder

If you use your mobile device for listening to podcasts, you’ll be pleased to find the nice and functional podcast manager CatchPodder, which lets you subscribe to multiple feeds as well as playing files directly from the server.

AudioBook Reader

Keeping with the theme of listening to people talk on your Ubuntu device, we have an AudioBook manager and player that is being written with the Ubuntu SDK, which lets you load books, display cover images, and more.

Bits

If you’re a software developer, sysadmin or network engineer, there’s a good chance you’ve had to convert numbers between decimal, hexadecimal and binary.  This makes Bits a very handy utility app to keep in your pocket.

Periodic Table

From the same developer who created a Software Center front-end and Pivotal Tracker (both featured in previous posts) has a new project underway, an element browser that gives you loads of detailed information about everything on the periodic table.

WebMap

Canonical engineering Manager Pat McGowan has gotten into the fun too, building an app for displaying web-based maps from a number of providers.

GetMeWheels

For Car2Go customers looking to rent or return a vehicle, GetMeWheels lets you easily find the nearest locations to you.  Created by the same developer as the XBMC remote, this app was originally developed for Maemo/Meego, but is now being ported to the Ubuntu SDK.

PlayMee

A third app from the developer of GetMeWheels and XBMC Remote is PlayMee, a local music player that again was originally developed for Maemo/Meego, and is being ported to the Ubuntu SDK.

Tic-Tac-Toe

Tic-Tac-Toe is not a fancy game, but this one developed by Hairo Carela makes beautiful use of animation and colors, and even keeps a nice score history.

LightOff

If games are you thing, you should also check out LightOff, a simple yet challenging game where the object is to turn off all of the lights, but clicking one toggles the state of every square around it.

 

That’s all for now, keep those apps coming and be sure to post them in the Ubuntu App Developers community on Google+

 

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Michael Hall

If you missed it, I posted an earlier round of SDK apps a couple weeks ago.  Well the pace of new app development didn’t slow down, so here I am again with another round of apps being written with what is still an alpha version of the Ubuntu SDK.

Core Apps Update

First an update on the Ubuntu Touch Core Apps project.  I highlighted a few of these already in my last post, but in the past week those apps have received several updates, and others have had the initial features start to land as well.

Calculator

In addition to being able to scroll back through previous calculations, the Calculator App developers have now added the ability to start a new calculation by dragging up and “tearing off” the current one, moving it into the history for later browsing.

Clock

The Clock app has been given a slight visual update on the main screen, and all new stop watch functionality too!

Calendar

The Calendar App now shows events for the day, and will take over the full screen to let you easily view your busy schedule.

Weather

The weather app too has added some visual features, and with the detailed design workflows just released, you can expect to see major changes coming to this app soon.

RSS Reader

The RSS Reader got off to a good start this week, allowing you to add feeds and read articles, either all aggregated together or one feed at a time.


File Manager

Finally, the File Manager is now working enough to let you browse through files and folders, and even open files in the appropriate application

Independent Apps

A man of many talents

Developer Ashley Johnson has been working on a couple of new apps using the Ubuntu SDK.  His first was a touch-friendly version of the Ubuntu Software Center:

Click for video

Followed up earlier this week with an Ubuntu Touch client for the Pivotal Tracker project management web service:

Click for video

Ubuntu Loves Reddit

We must, because there is not one, not two, but three separate Reddit apps being written with the Ubuntu SDK.

By Victor Thompson

By Bram Geelen

By yours truly

Ultimate Time Waster

Even Canonical’s VP of Engineering, Rick Spencer, has gotten in on the fun.  Though his app, which gathers funny pictures from across the internet for easy browsing, it’s as productivity-focuses as you might expect.

Dawning of the age of Aquarius

Canonical’s Stuart Langridge (aquarius on IRC, for those who don’t get the reference) is our resident audio-phile, which might explain why he’s written two music apps with the Ubuntu SDK, one for Ext.fm and another for Ubuntu One’s Music Streaming service.

Zeegaree

Developer Micha? Pr?dotka is porting his desktop timer app Zeegaree to the Ubuntu SDK

GPS Workout tracker

Fitness trackers are becoming more and more popular, especially as mobile apps.  Ready to meet this demand is Marin Bareta and his workout tracker for Ubuntu Touch

uQQ

QQ, the popular instant messaging service out of China, is getting it’s own native uQQ Ubuntu SDK client thanks to developer ? ? (shared to me by Szymon Waliczek)

Resistor Color Codes

I’m not electrical engineer, so I don’t know exactly what this does, but if you do I bet it would be handy to have available in your pocket, so thank Oliver Marks for making it.

Stock Tracker

Last but not least, I just saw this stock price tracker from Robert Steckroth

 

If you are writing an Ubuntu SDK app, or have come across one that I haven’t blogged about yet, be sure to drop me an email or ping me on IRC.  I get the feeling this isn’t the last SDK Apps update I’ll be posting.

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Michael Hall

By now you should have heard that Canonical is branching out from the desktop and has begun work on getting Ubuntu on TVs.   Lost in all the discussion of OEM partnerships and content distribution agreements is a more exciting (from my perspective) topic: Ubuntu TV shows why Unity was the right choice for Canonical to make.

The Unity Platform

Ubuntu TV doesn’t just look like Unity, it is Unity.  A somewhat different configuration, visually, from the desktop version, but fundamentally the same.  Unity isn’t just a top panel and side launcher, it is a set of technologies and APIs: Indicators, Lenses, Quick Lists, DBus menus, etc.  All of those components will be the same in Ubuntu TV as they are on the desktop, even if their presentation to the user is slightly different.  When you see Unity on tablets and phones it will be the same story.

The Developer Story

Having the same platform means that Ubuntu offers developers a single development target, whether they are writing an application for the desktop, TVs, tablets or phones.  There is only one notifications API, only one search API, only one cloud syncing API.  Nobody currently offers that kind of unified development platform across all form factors, not Microsoft, not Google, not Apple.

If you are writing the next Angry Birds or TweetDeck, would you want to target a platform that only exists on one or two form factors, or one that will allow your application to run on all of them without having to be ported or rewritten?

The Consumer Story

Anybody with multiple devices has found an application for one that isn’t available for another.  How many times have we wanted the functionality offered by one of our desktop apps available to us when we’re on the go?  How many games do you have on your phone that you’d like to have on your laptop too?  With Ubuntu powered devices you will have what you want where you want it.  Combine that with Ubuntu One and your data will flow seamlessly between them as well.

A farewell to Gnome 2

None of this would have been possible with Gnome 2.  It was a great platform for it’s time, when there was a clear distinction between computers and other devices.  Computers had medium-sized screens, a keyboard and a mouse.  They didn’t have touchscreens, they didn’t change aspect ratio when turned sideways.  Devices lacked the ability to install third party applications, the mostly lacked network connectivity, and they had very limited storage and processing capabilities.

But now laptops and desktops have touch screens, phones have multi-core, multi-GHz processors.  TVs and automobiles are both getting smarter and gaining more and more of the features of both computers and devices.  And everything is connected to the Internet.  We need a platform for this post-2010 computing landscape, something that can be equally at home with a touch screen as it is with a mouse, with a 4 inch and a 42 inch display.

Unity is that platform.

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