Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'nablopomo'

Michael Hall

Last week I posted on G+ about the a couple of new sets of QML API docs that were published.  Well that was only a part of the actual story of what’s been going on with the Ubuntu API website lately.

Over the last month I’ve been working on implementing and deploying a RESTful JSON service on top of the Ubuntu API website, and last week is when all of that work finally found it’s way into production.  That means we now have a public, open API for accessing all of the information available on the API website itself!  This opens up many interesting opportunities for integration and mashups, from integration with QtCreator in the Ubuntu SDK, to mobile reference apps to run on the Ubuntu phone, or anything else your imagination can come up with.

But what does this have to do with the new published docs?  Well the RESTful service also gives us the ability to push documentation up to the production server, which is how those docs got there.  I’ve been converting the old Django manage.py scripts that would import docs directly into the database, to instead push them to the website via the new service, and the QtMultimedia and QtFeedback API docs were the first ones to use it.

Best of all, the scripts are all automated, which means we can start integrating them with the continuous integration infrastructure that the rest of Ubuntu Engineering has been building around our projects.  So in the near future, whenever there is a new daily build of the Ubuntu SDK, it will also push the new documentation up, so we will have both the stable release documentation as well as the daily development release documentation available online.

I don’t have any docs yet on how to use the new service, but you can go to http://developer.ubuntu.com/api/service/ to see what URLs are available for the different data types.  You can also append ?<field>=<value> keyword filters to your URL to narrow the results.  For example, if you wanted all of the Elements in the Ubuntu.Components namespace, you can use http://developer.ubuntu.com/api/service/elements/?namespace__name=Ubuntu.Components to do that.

That’s it for today, the first day of my UbBloPoMo posts.  The rest of this week I will be driving to and fro for a work sprint with the rest of my team, the Ubuntu SDK team, and many others involved in building the phone and app developer pieces for Ubuntu.  So the rest of this week’s post may be much shorter.  We’ll see.

Happy Hacking.

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Michael Hall

So it’s not February first yet, but what the heck I’ll go ahead and get started early.  I tried to do the whole NaBloPoMo thing a year or so ago, but didn’t make it more than a week.  I hope to do better this time, and with that in mind I’ve decided to put together some kind of a plan.

First things first, I’m going to cheat and only plan on having a post published ever week day of the month, since it seems that’s when most people are reading my blog (and/or Planet Ubuntu) anyway, and it means I don’t have to worry about it over the weekends.  If you really, really want to read a new post from me on Saturday……you should get a hobby.  Then blog about it, on Planet Ubuntu.

To try and keep me from forgetting to blog during the days I am committing to, I’ve scheduled a recurring 30 minute slot on my calendar.  UbBloPoMo posts should be something you can write up in 30 minutes or less, I think, so that should suffice.  I’ve also scheduled it for the end of my work day, so I can talk about things that are still fresh in my mind, to make it even easier.

Finally, because Europe is off work by the end of my day, I’m going to schedule all of my posts to publish the following morning at 9am UTC (posts written Friday will publish on Monday morning).  I’ve been doing this for a while with my previous posts, and it seems to get more views when I do. For example, this post was written yesterday, but posted while I was still sound asleep this morning.  The internet is a magical place.

So, today being Friday, I will be writing my first actual UbBloPoMo entry this evening, and it will post on Monday February 3rd.  What will it be about I wonder?  The suspense is killing me.

 

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Michael Hall

It’s late, I’m tired, so this is going to be brief.  But if I didn’t put something up now, chances are I’d procrastinate to the point where it didn’t matter anymore, so something is better than nothing.

JuJu

So the buzz all week was about Juju and Charms.  It’s a very cool technology that I think is really going to highlight the potential of cloud computing.  Until now I always had people comparing the cloud to virtual machines, telling me they already automate deploying VMs, but with Juju you don’t think about machines anymore, virtual of otherwise.  It’s all about services, which is really what you want, a service that is doing something for you.  You don’t need to care where, or on what, or in combination with some other thing, Juju handles all that automatically.  It’s really neat, and I’m looking forward to using it more.

Summit

Summit worked this week.  In fact, this is the first time in my memory where there wasn’t a problem with the code during UDS.  And that’s not because we left it alone either.  IS actually moved the entire site to a new server the day before UDS started.  We landed several fixes during the week to fix minor inconveniences experienced by IS or the admins.  And that’s not even taking into consideration all the last-minute features that were added by our Linaro developers the week prior.  But through it all, Summit kept working.  That, more than anything else, is testament to the work the Summit developers put in over the last cycle to improve the code quality and development processes, and I am very, very proud that.  But we’re not taking a break this cycle.  In fact, we had two separate sessions this week about ways to improve the user experience, and will be joined by some professional designers to help us towards that goal.

Ubuntu One eBook syncing

So what started off as an casual question to Stuart Langridge turned into a full blown session about how to sync ebook data using Ubuntu One.  We brainstormed several options of what we can sync, including reading position, bookmarks, highlights and notes, as well as ways to sync them in an application agnostic manner.  I missed the session on the upcoming Ubuntu One Database (U1DB), but we settled on that being the ideal way of handling this project, and that this project was an ideal test case for the U1DB.  For reasons I still can’t explain, I volunteered to develop this functionality, at some point during the next cycle.  It’s certainly going to be a learning experience.

Friends

Friends!  It sure was good to catch up with all of you.  Both friends from far-away lands, and those closer to home.  Even though we chat on IRC almost constantly, there’s still nothing quite like being face to face.  I greatly enjoyed working in the same room with the Canonical ISD team, which has some of the smartest people I’ve ever had the pleasure of working with.  It was also wonderful to catch up with all my friends from the community.  I don’t know of any other product or project that brings people together the way Ubuntu does, and I’m amazed and overjoyed that I get to be a part of it.

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Michael Hall

If you’ve been doing anything with Ubuntu lately, chances are you’ve been hearing a lot of buzz about Juju.  If you’re attending UDS, then there’s also a good chance that you’ve been to one or more sessions about Juju.  But do you know it?

The building blocks for Juju are it’s “charms”, which detail exactly how to deploy and configure services in the Cloud.  Writing charms is how you harness the awesome power of Juju.  Tomorrow (Friday) there will be a 2 hour session all about writing charms, everything from what they do and how they work, to helping you get started writing your own.  Questions will be answers, minds will be inspired, things will be made, so don’t miss out.

http://summit.ubuntu.com/uds-p/meeting/19875/juju-charm-school/

(Photo courtesy of http://www.flickr.com/photos/slightlynorth/3977607387/)

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Michael Hall

Are you both an Ubuntu user and a bibliophile?  Want to keep your ebooks synced between all your connected devices, including bookmarks and reading position?   If so, join us for this UDS session Thursday, Nov 3rd, where we’ll be talking about how to add that functionality to Ubuntu One.

http://summit.ubuntu.com/uds-p/meeting/19820/other-p-u1-book-sync/

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