Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'kids'

Michael Hall

Well, we did it.  The six members of the Canonical Community Team stayed awake and (mostly) online for 24 straight hours, all for your entertainment and generous donations.  A lot of people gave a lot over the last week, both in terms of money and time, and every one of you deserves a big round of applause.

Team Insanity

First off, I wanted to thank (blame) our fearless leader, Jono Bacon, for bringing up this crazy idea in the first place.  He is the one who thought we should do something to give back to other organizations, outside of our FLOSS eco-system.  It’s good to remind us all that, as important as our work is, there are still things so much more important.  So thanks, Jono, for giving us a chance to focus some of our energy on the things that really matter.

I also need to thank the rest of my team, David Planella, Jorge Castro, Nick Skaggs and Daniel Holbach, for keeping me entertained and awake during that long, long 24 hours.  There aren’t many people I could put up with for that long, I’m glad I work in a team full of people like you.  And most importantly, thanks to all of our families for putting up with this stunt without killing us on-air.

Upstream Awesomeness

Before we started this 24-hour marathon, I sent a challenge to the Debian community.  I said that if I got 5 donations from their community, I would wear my Debian t-shirt during the entire broadcast.  Well, I should have asked for more, because it didn’t take long before I had more than that, so I was happily sporting the Debian logo for 24 hours (that poor shirt won’t ever be the same).

I wasn’t the only one who put a challenge to the Debian community.  Nick made a similar offer, in exchange for donations he would write missing man pages, and Daniel did the same by sending patches upstream.  As a result, the Debian community made an awesome showing in support of our charities.

All of our donors

The biggest thanks, of course, go out to all of those who donated to our charities.  Because of your generosity we raised well over £5000, with the contributions continuing to come in even after we had all finally gone to bed.  As of right now, our total stands at £ 5295.70 ($8486).  In particular, I would like to thank those who helped me raise £739.13 ($1184) for the Autism Research Trust:

And a very big thank you to my brother, Brian Hall, who’s donation put us over £5000 when we only had about an hour left in the marathon.  And, in a particularly touching gesture of brotherly-love, his donation came with this personal challenge to me:

So here it is.  The things I do for charity.

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Michael Hall

The Canonical Community Team is running a week long charity fundraising drive, capped by a 24-hour live work hangout.  We all chose a different charity, and will be promoting it and encouraging donations during the week.  I chose to support the Autism Research Trust, and wanted to share a little bit about why.

Those in the open source community, or who are computer scientists, engineers or programmers, will be no strangers to Autism. Autism, and it’s associated spectrum, affect 1 out of every 88 children according to a recent study. In our geek community, the number is likely even higher than that.

Many of you may notice my blog’s banner, or read the post from when I put it up. When my first child was 2 years old, he was diagnosed with something called PDD-NOS (Pervasive Developmental Disorder, not otherwise specified), which is basically the catch-all “we don’t really know what’s wrong” category in the Autism spectrum. We were told this by a neurologist who then left the room without explaining what it was, what it would mean for our son, or what we were supposed to do about it. It was scary as hell.

What made things worse is that there is very little that anybody actually knows about Autism. Nobody knows what it actually is, or what causes it. There is no known cure or medicine to treat it. Our son needed our help, and we literally didn’t know how to give it. When he turned 3 years old he could speak only a handful of words. He was smart though, he seemed to understand everything, but we couldn’t communicate with him, or him with us. It was extremely frustrating for everyone.

The only thing that’s been proven to help children with Autism is early intervention. We were lucky, he was diagnosed at a much younger age than most kids. We found local speech and occupational therapy centers, and for over a year he went to these 3-4 times a week. Local organizations like Autism Speaks and the Central Florida Autism Institute helped us find what worked for him, because every child is different.

Early intervention has given our son his future back.  He still struggles with the effects of Autism, it doesn’t ever go away, but he’s learned how to work around it, and we’ve learned how to work around it.  That is why I have chosen Autism research as my charity for the Community Team 24-hour marathon, because there are still millions of children who need this intervention, and millions of parents struggling to understand how to help them.  And every dollar, pound or euro you give is likely to change somebody’s life.

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