Canonical Voices

Victor Palau

A few months back, I decided to write a Simple ToDo app for Android, then I hooked it up to a cloud backend, using Juju. That was my first Android application, so I got to experience first hand the latest developer documentation and development environment.

Last month, Canonical launched Ubuntu for Phones, that gave me the idea to re-write the same application on QML using the Ubuntu Components.

Clearly comparing a new SDK-Alpha with a stable platform like Android will seem hardly fair, however, keep reading as you might be surprised of the results.

QML vs Dalvik Java

Lets start with QT/QML vs Dalvik/Java – I found QML really easy to get to grips with and be productive. I had the UI (see picture below) running in no time and I would say much faster than with Android.  QML is a very flexible declarative environment that allows you to embedded quick logic into the layout. This is a blessing and  a curse.

While with Android, it was very easy to keep a nice MVC  separation, I struggled to stop the leaks in QML. So while it is very easy to quickly write a functional application, it does not impose what you would consider as good development practices.

In summary, they are both very powerful development environments.

todoapp

IDE: Eclipse vs QtCreator

Part of the development experience is the IDE. I must say that I simply love the QTCreator. Possibly not as polish as Eclipse but you don’t need to read a manual to use it. Also, with a quick integration with the HUD, it is just very simple to use.

So what is QTCreator missing? A good emulator. The Android Development Kit (ADK) provides a really good user experience to develop mobile solutions. QMLScene gives you similar functionality but does not simulate a phone environment. However, all the technology is there, and  I am sure that will be included in the v1.0 version of the SDK.

Documentation

I can’t fault Android developer documentation, but taking into account its popularity, you  wouldn’t expect anything else.

I was very surprise of the quality of information on http://developer.ubuntu.com/ and specially with the component showcase.

componentshowcase

The only thing to watch out for is that in Android you can get all the info you need from a single website. With QML you quickly end up pinging between Digia, Nokia and Ubuntu pages.

The Code

The code is on my launchpad repos. The actual source functionality is not finished as I am still trying to figure out how to add menu options to access Done items. Anyway, the whole thing is pretty compact compare to the Dalvik code. The actual logic is almost identical in both. A ListView that is populate from an List model. All the data is persisted in SQLite db.

Conclusion

Both environments have been equally painless to work with, the difference is that the Ubuntu environment has *just* been released as an Alpha. I think this is the start of a very vibrant App development ecosystem.


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Victor Palau

Last month I attended DroidCon 2012 and did a talked about using Juju and Ubuntu to deliver Android applications with a Web Service background. The guys at Skillmatters were kind enough to record and edit the video, and now it publicly available.

 


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Victor Palau

Chances are that either by now, or by the end of the week, some of you reading this post will have bought a new computer with Windows 8. Chances are high that you immediately felt the urge of installing Ubuntu, possibly also to have a shower.

If you did, I would like you to tell me about (Installing Ubuntu.. not about having a shower). I am specially interested if you installed 12.10, and if you had any secure boot issues.

Did all work magically? Did you have to muck around with BIOS settings? Tell me all about it.


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Victor Palau

A very brief note to let you all know that I have moved the chromium test extension for browsing simulation under the Ubuntu-nexus7. Please submit improvements at your leasure:

https://code.launchpad.net/~ubuntu-nexus7/ubuntu-nexus7/chromium_extension


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Victor Palau

To make it easier to keep up with the work and progress on the Nexus 7 , I have set up a topic in status.ubuntu.com and a wiki page with the performance goals for the release:

If there is  a missing Blueprint that should be track under this topic, please let me know.

 


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Victor Palau

Yesterday I mentioned how I got 7 hours of battery life whilst browsing, this was done at a brightness level of 76. After that I decided to run the test again but set the brightness level to 40. This gave me an extra hour , which is about 14% extra battery life. Was I expecting more? perhaps..

 


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Victor Palau

I stumbled upon a Chrome OS test case that includes a chromium-browser extension that simulates user browsing. The extension does a 1 hour test split by:

  • [First 60% of the test] Browsing: a new website is loaded every minute.  The web page loaded is scrolled down one page every second, then scrolled back up one page every second.
  • [Next 20%] Email: Gmail is loaded in the foreground tab and audio is streamed from a background tab.
  • [Next 10%] Documents: Various Google Docs are loaded.
  • [Final 10%] Video: A full screen 480p YouTube Video is played.

Besides the fact that the audio requires flash, everything else worked in the Nexus 7. After a few tweaks to the extension, I had it running on a loop for 24 hours. Also, I changed it so the auto-browsing would start as soon as you launch chromium.

The next thing to do was to write a simple bash script that would launch the browser and log battery life and screen brightness to a file every 15 min. The assumption was that as the system run out of battery it would shutdown, and that last entry in the file would give me the battery life whilst browsing.

  • Battery levels can be read from here (thanks ogra!): /sys/class/power_supply/battery/capacity
  • Brightness levels can be read from here: /sys/class/backlight/pwm-backlight/brightness

I set it to run overnight at a screen brightness of 99. The good news is that the system suspended rather than just run out of juice at about 4:51 AM (according to the browser history).  3 hours later, I resumed it to find it in a good state.

All and all - the Nexus 7 with Ubuntu was browsing for just over 7 hours (7 hours and 12 minutes), so I am pretty happy with that. Although, for any reliable benchmarking, I would need at least 10 samples of the test run. If you want to check out the test, you can find all the code here: http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~vtuson/+junk/load_test_nexus7/

Here is a graphical representation of the results:

The brightness “auto-dim” was a bit disappointing, not to say erratic, and I have filed a couple of bugs against it.


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Victor Palau

I decided to run some browser performance benchmarks from http://peacekeeper.futuremark.com/ in the Nexus 7 running Ubuntu, mainly to see how it compares with other platforms. Here are my basic conclusions as a result of the test:

  • In general Ubuntu + Nexus 7 performs pretty well
  • The Nexus 7 with Ubuntu and Chromium (629) performs better that the Android Nexus 7 (489)
  • Firefox performance (257) is pretty bad compare with Chromium (629). I have tested it in my laptop and the same different exist, however the more powerful hardware makes it not as relevant.

Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to access the detailed results (it displays blank), any suggestions why? My results are the bottom firefox (257) results, and the top Chrome (629):


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Victor Palau

I just proposed the following blueprint  for UDS-R, and I though I will share it here to give it more visibility:

https://blueprints.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+spec/topic-raring-desktop-targets-for-embedded

What does it take to run Ubuntu Desktop on mobile devices?

It’s time to look at the core of Ubuntu and review it through a mobile lens. During 13.04, we will like to measure and improve how the guts of our platform performs against mobile metrics.

Things like battery life, memory footprint, support for sensors… are areas where needs and expectation widely vary between a PC and a mobile devices. 13.04 will be a cycle of exploration and learning. Because there is no better way to learn that getting your hands dirty, our practical exercise will be to get Ubuntu Desktop working on the Nexus 7.

The Nexus 7 exercise will be less like a 100 meters sprint (if you don’t cross the finish line you don’t get a score) and more like Javelin competition. The further that we can throw it, the higher the score!

On those basis, here are 8 types of Javelins to throw and some distance markers to hit for Ubuntu Desktop on Nexus 7:

*Memory Usage* ->Desktop runs well with 1GB RAM ->Desktop, Web Browser and email app all run well within 1GB -> Desktop runs well with 512MB -> Desktop, Web Browser and email app all run well within 512MB

*Power Mangement* -> Instant on ->Suspend/Resume 100 cycles with only 1 error -> boot up time <1 min -> Sensible Auto Suspend policy

*Battery Life* -> CPU on idle <1% -> Standby battery life is > 150 hours -> Battery life while browsing is > 8 hours -> Battery life playing HD video is > 5 hours -> Standby battery life is > 275 hours

*Testing* -> Functional shell test that can be loaded manually into the ROM ->Performance tests can be run -> Automated battery life test -> Automated battery life test

*Desktop Apps* -> Web browser boots < 3 sec -> Email client (local or web apps) -> Music Player -> Video Player -> Games

*Desktop Unity Performance* -> Fast App-Stack switching -> Launcher Reveal time < 2 secs -> Dash Reveal time < 3 secs ->Dash search < 5 sec ->Unity performs >60 FPS

*Functionality* -> Unity Desktop works ->touch input performs well -> Play a youtube video of a cat -> Play an HD movie -> Ubuntu one

*Sensors* -> Mic & Wifi -> Touch -> Camera -> position awareness sensors -> NFC

Click in the blueprint to see a summary of other releated UDS-R sessions.


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Victor Palau

Oh my, seems that the Canonical team has been busy ;)

link to youtube video -  Here


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Victor Palau

If you thought I had concluded my blog series on demonstrating how Ubuntu is the best environment to write up “connected” or “cloud backend” Android Apps, think again!

So far this is what we covered:

  • Proof that you can access a Juju local environment from the Android Emulator  done!
  • Using a few charms from the charm store plus a custom one, set up a MySQL database that can be exposed through a web service with simple commands/steps - done!
  • Develop a TODO list android app and connect it to the web service, so they talk to each other. – done!

The next step is “How to test that it all works on a production environment”.  If you have tested to death both your Android application and your web service locally, it is time to check if they will still work in real life. How do we do this? With few simple commands, we are going to deploy the same web service into the Amazon Cloud, and  the application in a mobile phone. All managed from the comfort of my Ubuntu Desktop.

Deploying to Amazon Web Services (AWS)

The only pre-requisite here is that you do have an AWS account. Once you are logged into the AWS website, you can find the credentials that you will need to set up your juju environment.  You can find a tutorial on how to set up your Elastic Compute Cloud (ec2) environment –> here.

The required information for Juju is stored in the environment.yaml file in the ~/.juju folder. In the following sample file you can see that two environments have been defined:

  • “local” is the environment that I have been using in my PC to test my web service using LXC containers.
  • “aws” gives Juju the information required to deploy services using my Amazon account.
  • “local” is set as default. This means that if I just run “juju bootstrap” this command applies to the local environment. To bootstrap the AWS environment, I would do “juju bootstrap -e aws”.
default: local
environments:
 aws:
  type: ec2
  access-key: YOUR-ACCESS-KEY-GOES-HERE
  secret-key: YOUR-SECRET-KEY-GOES-HERE
  control-bucket: juju-faefb490d69a41f0a3616a4808e0766b
  admin-secret: 81a1e7429e6847c4941fda7591246594
  default-series: precise
  juju-origin: ppa
  ssl-hostname-verification: true
 local:
  type: local
  control-bucket: juju-a14dfae3830142d9ac23c499395c2785999
  admin-secret: 6608267bbd6b447b8c90934167b2a294999
  default-series: precise
  juju-origin: distro
  data-dir: /home/victorp/myjuju_data

With my environments now configured, it’s time to deploy my services. This first step is to bootstrap my environment:

juju bootstrap -e aws

With the command completed successfully, I can check the status and I will see that the juju control instance is now up and running in Amazon:

juju status -e aws
2012-09-19 11:43:34,248 INFO Connected to environment.
machines:
  0:
    agent-state: running
    dns-name: ec2-75-101-189-208.compute-1.amazonaws.com
    instance-id: i-0e4f7174
    instance-state: running
services: {}
2012-09-19 11:43:35,322 INFO 'status' command finished successfully

Lets continue deploying the services. As I am only doing testing, I want to pay the minimum for it, it will ask juju to set a constrain to only use micro instances. Then I will deploy a mysql and a lamp service:

juju set-constraints instance-type=t1.micro -e aws
juju deploy mysql -e aws
juju deploy --repository ~/mycharm local:lamp -e aws
juju set lamp website-database="android_todo" -e aws
juju set lamp website-bzr="lp:~vtuson/+junk/mytodo_web" -e aws
juju expose lamp -e aws
juju add-relation lamp mysql -e aws

With all my services now running I can go to the Amazon EC2 instance console and see how they have been deployed as micro instances. I can now also enter the public address for my lamp service and see the ToDo list table as expected.

Testing the Android App on a real phone

Running Juju status, I can retrieve the public url for the lamp service and I replace the uri vairable in the TodoSourceData class with “ec2-107-22-151-171.compute-1.amazonaws.com/database.php”.  The next step is to plug a HTC Desire set up on debug mode into my laptop’s usb port. The rest is taken care by the Android Eclipse plug-ins. When I click  the run project button, I am presented with a choice of targets:

I just need to press “OK” and my ToDo app is launched in the handset. Opening the menu options and pressing “Sync” fetches the ToDo data from the Amazon services, as expected:

That is all for today! Let me know if you have any suggestions on what else I should cover on this blog series.


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Victor Palau

Droidcon – London

Just a brief post to say that I will be talking at DroidCon on 26th October in London. This is what I will be covering:

Most Android apps nowadays are a front or local client for online services, from backing up data to the cloud to providing a cross platform service. This requires developers to have access to not just an Android environment, but also to a staging server that they can mess with. This requires the app developer to either gain knowledge of how to set up this complex web, or wait for someone to do it for them.

Juju is a service orchestration tool that allows you to deploy cloud applications like WordPress or Mysql to live clouds such as Amazon Web Services (AWS). Juju Charms package the wisdom of experience Dev Ops so anyone can deploy a complex apps with few simple commands. This can first be done to a local environment running in your laptop, and once you are confident on the service, deploy it to a live cloud. Ubuntu ,the leading linux desktop distribution, brings together the best support for Android app development (used by the Google Android team) with an easy to use cloud deployment toolset.

This talk will explore the simplicity of developing an android app that needs to talk to a cloud service. The talk will be framed around an example of a “TODO list” android app that locally stores information into a SQLite database, and then backs-up user data to the cloud. The talk will show how a android developer can deploy, in his or her laptop, a complex web service with just a handful of commands, and then get the application talking to the service form within the android emulator. Join us to grasp how Ubuntu can provide android developers a full test environment in a box.

My Droidcon talk profile


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Victor Palau

Time for the next chapter of my blog series about demonstrating how Ubuntu is the best environment to write up “connected” or “cloud backend” Android Apps.  As you might know, the Android SDK allows you to set up a sandboxed environment to develop Mobile apps in your desktop, using Juju  you can do the same for Cloud apps.

To walk you through how to put these great development tools together, I set out to accomplish:

  • Proof that you can access a Juju local environment from the Android Emulator  done!
  • Using a few charms from the charm store plus a custom one, set up a MySQL database that can be exposed through a web service with simple commands/steps  - done!
  • Develop a TODO list android app
  • Connect the android app and the webservice, so they talk to each other.

Today I am going to cover the bottom two bullet points in one go!  For this post, I am going to assume that you know a bit of Android development. If you want a great source of introductory material check Lars Vogel’s website.

I have created a simple ToDo Android application that can store tasks into a local SQLite db and allows you to “Star” important items. The code for my Simple Todo app is hosted in Launchpad. I have written my application for Android 2.3, but you can use a later version.

Reading remote data from the MySQL server is confined to a small class that retrieves a JSON object and translates it into a TodoItem object.  Equally , the server code that prints that content table into a JSON object is extremely simple. Beyond this, you can go crazy and implement a RESTfull API to sync the databases.

At the moment, I am just inserting Server side data into the Local database and making sure I don’t add duplicates.Here is a video that shows how easy is to work and test both environments:

Or Click Here for the video.

The same environment should then work if you are running the Android application on an external phone. But that is another blog post ;)


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Victor Palau

It is time to continue with my blog series on demonstrating how Ubuntu is the best environment to write up “connected” or “cloud backend” Android Apps.  As you might know, the Android SDK allows you to set up a sandboxed environment to develop Mobile apps in your desktop, using Juju  you can do the same for Cloud apps.

To walk you through how to put these great development tools together, I set out to accomplish:

  • Proof that you can access a Juju local environment from the Android Emulator  done!
  • Using a few charms from the charm store plus a custom one, set up a MySQL database that can be exposed through a web service with simple commands/steps
  • Develop a TODO list android app
  • Connect the android app and the webservice, so they talk to each other.

Today is time to set-up our own Cloud environment in a PC.  A good starting point for a web application is a LAMP stack. If you hope for you service to get popular, you might want to split out the database service and the web service into their own instances so they can be scaled easily.

When I set out to do this, I wanted to write an extremely simple PHP page that would expose a data table from a Mysql server.  I looked up the available charms on the store. I found that you had a lot of charms for existing apps, but none that had  the bare bones of a LAMP stack and just allowed you to install your own web pages. However, I did find a charm to deploy Mysql and a very handy tool to manage it (phpmyadmin). Taking this as a starting point I developed a generic LAMP charm.

The first thing the LAMP charm does is to install and configure a new instance with Apache and PHP5 in an LXC container. The new charm will then copy any files under /website  inside the charm folder structure, into /var/www. It also allows you to specify a Bazaar branch. It will clone the branch into the webserver and copy the contents to /var/www. I keep my TODO application for this exercise here.

Using juju, you can set up a relationship with a Mysql service. A Mysql database is created by default at this time. You can change the name of the database as a configuration options. If you provide a file called mysql_config either on the /website folder or in the root of you Bazaar branch, this will be used to configure further the Mysql database.

The charm will store the details of the relationship in /var/webconfig. In there you can also find opendb.php, a basic script that will open the connection to the MySQL database for you.

So lets get started! Clone the Lamp branch to a folder of your choice. I have it under “~/Mycharm/precise/lamp”. (If you need to get started with juju check my previous post here)

juju bootstrap

#step1 - deploy Mysql as a service.
juju deploy mysql

#step2 - deploy phpmyadmin tool
juju deploy phpmyadmin
juju set phpmyadmin password="password"

#this makes phpmyadmin public - exposes port 80/tcp
juju expose phpmyadmin

#step3 - link phpmyadmin and mysql so the can talk to each other
juju add-relation phpmyadmin mysql

#step4 deploy lamp from your local folder
juju deploy --repository ~/mycharm local:lamp

#step5 set up your bazaar branch and publish your website
juju set lamp website-bzr="lp:~vtuson/+junk/mytodo_web"
juju expose lamp

#step6 configure your database and link lamp and mysql services
juju set lamp website-database="android_todo"
juju add-relation lamp mysql

Once Juju has completed all the commands, run “juju status”. Now go to the ip address for the LAMP services and visit the databaseweb.php page (e.g. http://192.168.122.174/databaseweb.php) , you get this rather ugly table:

Id Todo Is it starred
1 hello this is a sample 1
2 yes it works! 0

This table is displaying the contents of a Mysql database. You will get the same data if you visit your Myphpadmin service:

So there you are a full and scalable LAMP stack in your PC!

If you want to update the web service by pulling the latest version of the Bazaar branch, just run the following commands:

juju set lamp bzr-update="yes"
juju set lamp bzr-update=

With my web developer “hat” on, I can now hand this charm over to my Android app developer. They will be able to set up exactly the same environment locally to test their app without using expensive server time.

So “Using a few charms from the charm store plus a custom one, set up a MySQL database that can be exposed through a web service with simple commands/steps” – DONE!


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Victor Palau

When it come to ARM Servers one thing that everyone agrees is that the new 64 bit architecture, introduced in ARMv8, will be a significant milestone for this market.

It seems that 14.04 LTS will be a big release for ARM Servers, as it is likely to be the first Long Term Support with ARMv8. However, the road to 14.04 starts now!

The first set of ARMv8 licensees are starting to be announced, so it is time to get Ubuntu ready for hardware bring up. What better place to start that with an ARMv8 kernel? and that is what Jeremy Kerr from Canonical has just published.

As he says: “Most of the components of the 64-bit ARM toolchain have been released, so I’ve put together some details on building a cross compiler for aarch64. At present, this is only binutils & compiler (ie, no libc), so is probably not useful for applications. However, I have a 64-bit ARM kernel building without any trouble.”

If you want to find out more about Jeremy’s work, see:

With the test kernel builds, we’re able to start low-level testing of ARMv8 hardware as soon as they become available. So, we are ready for ARMv8 hardware bring up, Are you?


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Victor Palau

Have you ever wondered what is all the fuss about ARM Servers? Yes? good , good.

Have you ever wish you had some crazy Zooming UI presentation that told you all about it? what.. no!? Well though.. because now you have one :)

If you haven’t heard of Prezi, it is a new way to generate more dynamic presentations. I will give you a few tips:

  • When viewing a Prezi, make sure you click on the “Full Screen” for maximum effect (under More..)
  • You can also click on autorun if you fancy the animation to happen on its own
  • You can also use the right and left arrows to move around the animation at your leisure
  • If you want to zoom into something, just double click on it!

Without further ado, I give you ARM Server on  a Prezi:

url: http://prezi.com/_zwqpnowk8cv/arm-server/


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Victor Palau

In my previous entry, I argued that Ubuntu is possibly the best development environment to write connected android apps, thanks to Juju. Although using WordPress was possibly not a great example :) I still think that this idea has legs! Hence, I have decided to build an example project.

The example will mainly  be a simple and plan ToDo list app for Android, that gets its items from a back-end MySQL server.

So here is my list of things to get done for this example project:

  • Proof that you can access a Juju local environment from the Android Emulator
  • Develop a TODO list android app
  • Using a few charms from the charm store plus a custom one, set up a MySQL database that can be exposed through a web service with simple commands/steps
  • Connect the android app and the webservice, so they talk to each other.

And as there is no time like the present, here is the first bullet point!

Accessing a Juju Local Environment from the Android Emulator

As I was working on my wordpress charm, the easiest thing for me to do was to access the local webserver set-up for the blog.  I first installed the Android SDK, which turned out to be pretty easy to do by just following the instructions posted at http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html . Apart of the sdk tools that download you the emulator, build tools and so on.. you can also choose to use Eclipse as your IDE. If you do this, you can then install an Android plug-in that is *very very* complete.  Having had previous experience with Eclipse, I choose this root and unless you feel very strongly against it, I recommend that you do the same.

Once I had the SDK installed, I run the 2.2 emulator (because that happens to be the version in the spare Android phone that I plan to use later on) and open the local IP address of the WordPress service.  That just worked fine.

Then I decided to create a sample android project and tried some code to do the same. I found that the following method within the main activity of the project was able to ping and then open in a browser window the wordpress app:

private String hostip = "192.168.122.137";

...

public void pingme(View view) {
 TextView info = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.mytext);
 WebView mweb = (WebView) findViewById(R.id.webView1);
 InetAddress in = null;

 Log.w("PING","trying to reach" + hostip);
 info.setText("trying to reach" + hostip);
 in = InetAddress.getByName(hostip);

 if (in.isReachable(5000)) {
   info.append("\nHost found");
   Log.w("FOUND",in.getCanonicalHostName());
 } else {
   info.append("\nHost found");
 }
 mweb.getSettings().setJavaScriptEnabled(true);
 mweb.loadUrl("http://"+hostip);
}

So in a nutshell, the first bullet point (and the easiest) of my list is completed!


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Victor Palau

[Juju adventure] Android

I have been playing for Juju for a bit before my nice and long holidays on the Costa Brava!

Back into action and I was thinking that I would be losingmy wordpress mobile app once I deploy my own wordpress instance, no? (please correct me if I am wrong). Would I be better of writting something simple for my own use on Android?

Then it dawned on me. Most phone apps today are mainly a front end to a web/cloud service. In that case, Ubuntu and Juju are the perfect development enviroment for an Android developer.

Think about it. You can write your app using the Android Linux SDK, then you can write your web service and deploy it locally with Juju. You can test that your end to end system works well and then deploy it. You just need to push your app to the android market and “juju deploy” your service into the public cloud.

I was curious, Has anyone tried this? Did it work well for you?


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Victor Palau

In my previous post, Jorge Castro commented that a new super wordpress charm is in the works, and I want to keep working on my blog site configuration (theme and plug-ins) without missing out on any updates. This means that I needed to stop forking the wordpress plugin and find a way to just use the one in the charm store and then ,onto the same instance, roll-out my configuration.

I mentioned that I might try splitting my configuration out into a Subordinate service, and that is what I done :) It was actually pretty easy.

I created a new charm called wordpress-conf.  I set the metadata.yaml file to contain:

name: wordpress-conf
summary: "WordPress configuration"
subordinate: true
description: |
Provides configuration for wordpress blogs
- Plugin:
- WordPress importers
- super cache plug-in
requires:
logging:
 interface: logging-directory
 scope: container
juju-info:
 interface: juju-info
 scope: container

As you can see it has a line calling out that this charm is a subordinate, and has two requirement.  The two requirements are for testing purposes really. The “logging” requirement is an explicit requirement that the charm that you are “subordinating” to must have defined, while “juju-info” is an implicit requirement that is define for all charms. What this mean is that using “juju-info”, I can deploy my charm against any service. The key is to define the scope as container.

The magic happens not when you deploy a subordinate charm, but when you add a relationship to another service. For example the following commands result on a wordpress instance setup following the WP charm in the charm store, but with my plugin and theme set up:

juju bootstrap
juju deploy wordpress
juju deploy mysql
juju add-relation wordpress mysql
juju expose wordpress
juju deploy --repository=~/mycharm local:precise/wordpress-conf
juju add-relation wordpress-conf wordpress

Pretty cool, eh!? I should be able to upgrade the two charms now independently


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Victor Palau

Reposting here the blog entry that I uploaded to blog.canonical.com

Have you been wondering if your Web application will work with the new generation of Hyperdense ARM Servers? Now you can easily find out by using Ubuntu and Amazon Web Services. Canonical has made available in Amazon Web Services an AMI image for developers wishing to experiment with Ubuntu ARM Server. Dann Frazier is the engineer behind this initiative. I took some of his time today to asking a few questions:

How did this came about?
We were wanting to do some internal functional testing of the 12.04 release across our global team without shipping hardware around. We had a QEMU model with us and using cloud systems to host it seemed like an excellent way to grow our (emulated) machine count.

Can you give me some examples of what could I do with it?
Basically, anything you can do with Ubuntu Server. You can install packages, deploy Juju charms, test your web applications, etc. However, I would strongly suggest not using it for any production work or performance testing – being an emulated environment, you will notice some overhead.

Who do you expect will use this new AMI?
Developers looking to test their applications on ARM, people wanting to test Juju charm deployments in a multi-architecture environment, and anyone just looking to kick the tires.

This is all great, How do I get my hands on it?
Canonical has published an AMI on Amazon EC2. You will need an Amazon Web Services account, then just go into your Management Console for EC2 and launch a new instance.  Select “Community AMIs” and look for AMI ID ‘ami-aef328c7′. (We’ll keep the latest AMI ID posted at http://wiki.ubuntu.com/ARM/Server). Or click here.

Are there any limations compared to a real hardware box?
The AMI provides an Ubuntu 12.04 (‘armhf’) system running on an emulated hardware system. Performance is limited due to the emulation overhead. This AMI requires the use of an m1.large instance type due to memory requirements.

Once again, thanks to Dann and the Canonical team for sharing this neat tool with the community. It sounds great and easy to set up. So, What are you waiting for?


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