Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'support'

Joshua Hoover

Since launching the Ubuntu One music store on the web there has been a steady flow of traffic to the web store and away from the store embedded in Rhythmbox on Ubuntu. The music store in Rhythmbox is operated separately from the one on the web, which means it requires a fair amount of additional work to keep it running smoothly. In order to make the music store better for everyone, regardless of what device they may be using at any given moment, we’re focusing on the web music store and removing the store from Rhythmbox in Ubuntu 13.04 as well as from previous releases, Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and 12.10 via a stable release update. With this change, all Ubuntu One music purchases will be made at https://one.ubuntu.com/music-store instead of in Rhythmbox. Your purchases will still automatically be delivered to your cloud storage, download to your computer and be available in Rhythmbox. Of course, if you have a music streaming subscription, you can also stream all your music from the web, Android, or iOS.

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Joshua Hoover

Notification about Notes

Throughout last year, as we invested heavily in our new data sync infrastructure, we gradually had to turn off services that were reliant on the old infrastructure and providing little value to our users. Our Notes service was one of these, so last year we removed Notes from the Ubuntu One web UI.

As part of that ongoing strategy to constantly make sure we are spending our time on the right things, we’ll continue to improve our services during 2013. One of these updates, an upcoming database change, will impact how we currently sync Tomboy Notes. By the end of February 2013 we will cease syncing Tomboy Notes to U1, meaning U1 won’t transfer your notes between computers. Those of you still using U1 to sync your notes will need to stop relying on the service to sync or restore notes after new installations.

We realize syncing notes to Ubuntu One was a nice feature for a small set of people, even so, we are contacting the Tomboy developers to help them support our new APIs which utilizes our new U1DB data sync service.

We are sorry for any inconvenience this causes and if you have any questions please contact us.

Update – February 5, 2013
The timing of our post and the deployment of some changes on the server side (unrelated to notes) yesterday couldn’t have been worse. Due to some unforeseen aftereffects of the deployment, notes sync was impacted, which meant when people synced their notes after this update the notes were deleted. We apologize for this. The good news is Tomboy does not delete notes but moves them to a backup folder. If your notes were deleted, please follow the steps in this FAQ. If you can’t restore your notes that way, please contact support for help.

Also, there are some alternatives for syncing notes in Tomboy. We’re providing two suggestions below.

1. Tomboy local backup
Backup your notes to a local folder and sync that folder with Ubuntu One. Note, if you are syncing notes between multiple computers, there may be some issues that arise due to conflicts. Here is how to sync notes with Ubuntu One and Tomboy’s local folder sync setup:

  1. Open Tomboy and open the Preferences menu
  2. Click on the “Synchronization” tab
  3. Click the “Clear” button
  4. Select “Local Folder” from the “Service” drop down menu
  5. Select a folder to sync your notes to from the “Folder Path” menu
  6. Click the “Save” button
  7. Open the Ubuntu One Control Panel and click the “Add a folder from this computer” button under the “Folders” tab and select the folder you chose in step 5

2. Rainy
Timo Dörr created Rainy, a note synchronisation/cloud server for Tomboy that can be used like Ubuntu One’s notes sync service. Rainy is a more advanced option and requires access to a server. If you’re interested, get started here.

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Joshua Hoover

Last month was a big one for Ubuntu and Ubuntu One. For Ubuntu One, in addition to all the improvements we made in Ubuntu 11.04, we also released substantial improvements to contacts on the web, including Facebook import. Our attention now turns to contacts sync for mobile devices.

We’re working on completely revamping contacts sync for mobile to give you an overall better experience. The new service will work with mobile devices running iOS or Android operating systems. We decided to focus on these two operating systems so we can deliver the best user experience without having to limit functionality to the lowest common denominator. The new service will be free and available later this year. If you are interested in testing the new service, please add your email address to this form and we will provide you with more info once the service is ready for testing.

As of June 1, 2011 the current Ubuntu One contacts sync for mobile will no longer be active. We’re stopping support for our current service so we can focus our energy on launching a much better service sooner than we could otherwise.

What happens to my contacts?
Contacts will continue to sync between Evolution and Ubuntu One. Your contacts will still be available via the web. For those who use the current contacts sync service on their phone or with the Funambol plugin for Outlook/Thunderbird this means contacts will no longer sync with Ubuntu One after May 31, 2011.

What if I’m a mobile package subscriber and only use it for syncing contacts?
For those who have the Ubuntu One mobile package and only use it for contacts sync, please contact us and we will provide a refund for all your mobile package charges as well as cancel your mobile package subscription. For those who use music streaming, please continue to enjoy music streaming and you will have the ability to sync contacts later this year.

We realize this transition may leave some of you with further questions, if that’s the case please contact us.

Thanks for your patience. Now it’s back to work on getting the new mobile contacts service out ASAP.

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Joshua Hoover

Hi, I’m Phil. I work in the Online Services group at Canonical in the Operations and Foundations group. We work on keeping Ubuntu One up and humming along and improving its core technologies.

I wanted to take a moment and apologize for the extension of our planned downtime on Tuesday morning. I was unable to anticipate the problem and since it happened roughly 3/4 of the way through the total process it wasn’t possible to roll back and restore the service in its previous state.

We had run through the upgrade process (database servers upgraded to 10.04, Postgres upgraded from 8.3 to 8.4, and a series of database patches rolled up and applied) across all our database servers and everything ran well within the time window that we defined in our initial outage announcement. During the production upgrade, the last storage shard spent a surprisingly long time re-adding a foreign key constraint. I spent longer than I would have liked hoping to wait the process out, thinking that we’d spend less total downtime vs. starting that import over from scratch. That didn’t end up being a smart decision.

I eventually reached the conclusion that this process wasn’t going to complete, and the import process was restarted. Two hours later the import was complete, all servers were restarted, and the service was restored to 100% functionality. Every developer and admin involved heaved a pretty serious sigh of relief.

So what did I do wrong, or what could we do better next time? First, I’m going to do a lot better job scheduling downtime going forward. This was scheduled for a low-traffic period where we had standard developer and admin coverage on a weekday; that gave us a small low-traffic window and with the unexpected increase in process time, we quickly ran into prime time. I should have scheduled it for a Sunday evening, giving us a much longer low-traffic window to work in where a minimum of users would be disrupted.

Second, we’ll do a better job of trusting our math. It was clear something was wrong much earlier than when we finally we pulled the trigger on restarting the process; I could have saved a couple of hours by trusting our initial analysis.

Finally, we’ll continue to work hard to extend our architecture to remove downtime and perform rolling upgrades. Perhaps zero downtime is an unrealistic expectation, but I’m going to make sure we get as close to that as we can.

Thanks so much for your patience and I hope you continue to enjoy the features we’ve added recently and have upcoming for Ubuntu One.

- Philip Fibiger

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Joshua Hoover

Ask Ubuntu

The Ubuntu One team has been working hard to improve support of late. We initially focused on our status page, FAQs, and contacting Ubuntu One support directly. All of those areas have gone through several iterations and are continuing to evolve. One part of the support equation we’ve been missing is a definitive place to get help from other Ubuntu One users. Ask Ubuntu is the place to go for this type of community support.

Ask Ubuntu logoTo steal a line from the FAQ, Ask Ubuntu is a Q&A site designed to make it easy for users to get answers to Ubuntu-related questions. It’s easy to get started asking and answering questions. You can use an OpenID login like a Launchpad or Google account, or other options like Facebook, etc. to login to the site. For Ubuntu One related questions, use the ubuntu-one tag. Once you receive an answer you’re satisfied with, mark it as the accepted answer by clicking on the check box outline to the left of the answer.

Beyond asking and answering questions, you can also vote (up or down) questions and answers others have provided. Votes go towards a person’s reputation on the site. For example, if you answer a question and someone votes your answer up, you’ll gain +10. If someone votes up your question, you’ll gain +5. That’s right, good questions go towards building your reputation. For more info on reputation and Ask Ubuntu in general, check out the Ask Ubuntu FAQ.

Some Ubuntu One questions can’t be answered on Ask Ubuntu. These include questions specific to your account (billing, login, etc.) or those that require details about specific content not syncing properly. For example, my file “~/Pictures/Joshua on mongoose hunt.jpg” won’t sync. Questions like these require private information to be exchanged and should be asked via the Ubuntu One contact form.

In general, when looking for Ubuntu One support, you’ll want to consider the following options, in this order:

  1. Status page – There may be a service disruption causing the problem you’re having.
  2. FAQs – We continue to build and groom a list of frequently asked questions that may provide the answer to the question you have.
  3. Ask Ubuntu – If your question is not account related and doesn’t appear to need specifics on your content (file names, contacts, etc.), ask the community for help.
  4. Contact form – If your question is account related or you have specific issues with your content (particular files or contacts not syncing, etc) then contact us directly for support.

We’re excited about Ask Ubuntu. It only takes a minute or so to sign up and start using the site, so please do! See you there.

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Matt Griffin

Ubuntu One support options

Now that we’re getting close to the 9.10 release, we thought it would be a good idea to review the technical and account support options that are available to all Ubuntu One subscribers. These options were selected because they fit closely with how software is often developed for Ubuntu, and, since the Ubuntu One development team uses these tools every day, it should provide a high degree of transparency to all subscribers as we receive suggestions, fix problems, and develop new features.

Launchpad
Launchpad is our primary tool to log bugs, diagnose issues, and track development. Anyone with a Launchpad login (available to everyone) can post bugs which the team reads daily and promptly addresses.

Since Launchpad is very transparent, anyone can read the bugs and help out with resolving issues. We encourage this type of community involvement that is a core aspect of Ubuntu. Launchpad users can also subscribe to bugs so they will be notified at each stage of the resolution.

Answers
Launchpad Answers
is a tool that enables subscribers to post more general questions about the Ubuntu One project. Team members answer these questions, but this is also an area where the Ubuntu community often steps in to provide assistance.

Ubuntu Forums
Ubuntu Forums
is similar to Launchpad Answers where subscribers can post questions about Ubuntu One features. Forums has a very active community of Ubuntu users that are frequently willing to help with issues and participate in lively discussion.

IRC
IRC (Internet Relay Chat) is a wonderful chat tool that Ubuntu One subscribers (or anyone) can use to communicate directly with the Ubuntu One development team. Interested individuals can find us in the #ubuntuone channel on freenode. The team is mostly based in England and the Americas, so you’re likely to reach us during normal business hours for these regions.

Account Support Form
Sometimes subscribers have questions about important account topics like credit card payments. Subscribers can go to their Account page to find the Account Assistance form to submit these types of questions directly to the team.

We hope these support resources meet the needs of all Ubuntu One subscribers and would like to hear your opinion. Anyone is welcome to join us in IRC and give us their thoughts.

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