Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'zfs'

Dustin Kirkland


On Monday this week, I was afforded the distinct privilege to deliver the opening keynote at the OpenZFS Developer Summit in San Francisco.  It was a beautiful little event, with a full day of informative presentations and lots of networking during lunch and breaks.

Below, you can view my slides, download the PDF, or watch the talk (starts at 31:10) and demo in its entirety.

Hopefully you'll enjoy the demo -- especially the most interesting raw tracing system new in the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Linux 4.4 kernel, something called The Berkeley Packet Filter, or "BPF" for short.  I used a series of open source utilities from Brendan Gregg (from Netflix), called iovisor/bcc.  Quoting the README.md on Github:

BCC is a toolkit for creating efficient kernel tracing and manipulation programs, and includes several useful tools and examples. It makes use of extended BPF (Berkeley Packet Filters), formally known as eBPF, a new feature that was first added to Linux 3.15. Much of what BCC uses requires Linux 4.1 and above.
I'll follow up this post with another one, formally introducing BPF and how to install and use bcc in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, if anyone is interested...




:-Dustin

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Dustin Kirkland


We at Canonical have conducted a legal review, including discussion with the industry's leading software freedom legal counsel, of the licenses that apply to the Linux kernel and to ZFS.

And in doing so, we have concluded that we are acting within the rights granted and in compliance with their terms of both of those licenses.  Others have independently achieved the same conclusion.  Differing opinions exist, but please bear in mind that these are opinions.

While the CDDL and GPLv2 are both "copyleft" licenses, they have different scope.  The CDDL applies to all files under the CDDL, while the GPLv2 applies to derivative works.

The CDDL cannot apply to the Linux kernel because zfs.ko is a self-contained file system module -- the kernel itself is quite obviously not a derivative work of this new file system.

And zfs.ko, as a self-contained file system module, is clearly not a derivative work of the Linux kernel but rather quite obviously a derivative work of OpenZFS and OpenSolaris.  Equivalent exceptions have existed for many years, for various other stand alone, self-contained, non-GPL kernel modules.

Our conclusion is good for Ubuntu users, good for Linux, and good for all of free and open source software.

As we have already reached the conclusion, we are not interested in debating license compatibility, but of course welcome the opportunity to discuss the technology.

Cheers,
Dustin

EDIT: This post was updated to link to the supportive position paper from Eben Moglen of the SFLC, an amicus brief from James Bottomley, as well as the contrarian position from Bradley Kuhn and the SFC.

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Dustin Kirkland


Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial) is only a few short weeks away, and with it comes one of the most exciting new features Linux has seen in a very long time...

ZFS -- baked directly into Ubuntu -- supported by Canonical.

What is ZFS?

ZFS is a combination of a volume manager (like LVM) and a filesystem (like ext4, xfs, or btrfs).

ZFS one of the most beloved features of Solaris, universally coveted by every Linux sysadmin with a Solaris background.  To our delight, we're happy to make to OpenZFS available on every Ubuntu system.  Ubuntu's reference guide for ZFS can be found here, and these are a few of the killer features:
  • snapshots
  • copy-on-write cloning
  • continuous integrity checking against data corruption
  • automatic repair
  • efficient data compression.
These features truly make ZFS the perfect filesystem for containers.

What does "support" mean?

  • You'll find zfs.ko automatically built and installed on your Ubuntu systems.  No more DKMS-built modules!
$ locate zfs.ko
/lib/modules/4.4.0-4-generic/kernel/zfs/zfs/zfs.ko
  • You'll see the module loaded automatically if you use it.

$ lsmod | grep zfs
zfs 2801664 11
zunicode 331776 1 zfs
zcommon 57344 1 zfs
znvpair 90112 2 zfs,zcommon
spl 102400 3 zfs,zcommon,znvpair
zavl 16384 1 zfs

  • The user space zfsutils-linux package will be included in Ubuntu Main, with security updates provided by Canonical (as soon as this MIR is completed).
  • As always, industry leading, enterprise class technical support is available from Canonical with Ubuntu Advantage services.

How do I get started?

It's really quite simple!  Here's a few commands to get you up and running with ZFS and LXD in 60 seconds or less.

First, make sure you're running Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial).

$ head -n1 /etc/issue
Ubuntu Xenial Xerus (development branch) \n \l

Now, let's install lxd and zfsutils-linux, if you haven't already:

$ sudo apt install lxd zfsutils-linux

Next, let's use the interactive lxd init command to setup LXD and ZFS.  In the example below, I'm simply using a sparse, loopback file for the ZFS pool.  For best results (and what I use on my laptop and production servers), it's best to use a raw SSD partition or device.

$ sudo lxd init
Name of the storage backend to use (dir or zfs): zfs
Create a new ZFS pool (yes/no)? yes
Name of the new ZFS pool: lxd
Would you like to use an existing block device (yes/no)? no
Size in GB of the new loop device (1GB minimum): 2
Would you like LXD to be available over the network (yes/no)? no
LXD has been successfully configured.

We can check our ZFS pool now:

$ sudo zpool list
NAME SIZE ALLOC FREE EXPANDSZ FRAG CAP DEDUP HEALTH ALTROOT
lxd 1.98G 450K 1.98G - 0% 0% 1.00x ONLINE -

$ sudo zpool status
pool: lxd
state: ONLINE
scan: none requested
config:

NAME STATE READ WRITE CKSUM
lxd ONLINE 0 0 0
/var/lib/lxd/zfs.img ONLINE 0 0 0
errors: No known data errors

$ lxc config get storage.zfs_pool_name
storage.zfs_pool_name: lxd

Finally, let's import the Ubuntu LXD image, and launch a few containers.  Note how fast containers launch, which is enabled by the ZFS cloning and copy-on-write features:

$ newgrp lxd
$ lxd-images import ubuntu --alias ubuntu
Downloading the GPG key for http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com
Progress: 48 %
Validating the GPG signature of /tmp/tmpa71cw5wl/download.json.asc
Downloading the image.
Image manifest: http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/server/releases/trusty/release-20160201/ubuntu-14.04-server-cloudimg-amd64.manifest
Image imported as: 54c8caac1f61901ed86c68f24af5f5d3672bdc62c71d04f06df3a59e95684473
Setup alias: ubuntu

$ for i in $(seq 1 5); do lxc launch ubuntu; done
...
$ lxc list
+-------------------------+---------+-------------------+------+-----------+-----------+
| NAME | STATE | IPV4 | IPV6 | EPHEMERAL | SNAPSHOTS |
+-------------------------+---------+-------------------+------+-----------+-----------+
| discordant-loria | RUNNING | 10.0.3.130 (eth0) | | NO | 0 |
+-------------------------+---------+-------------------+------+-----------+-----------+
| fictive-noble | RUNNING | 10.0.3.91 (eth0) | | NO | 0 |
+-------------------------+---------+-------------------+------+-----------+-----------+
| interprotoplasmic-essie | RUNNING | 10.0.3.242 (eth0) | | NO | 0 |
+-------------------------+---------+-------------------+------+-----------+-----------+
| nondamaging-cain | RUNNING | 10.0.3.9 (eth0) | | NO | 0 |
+-------------------------+---------+-------------------+------+-----------+-----------+
| untreasurable-efrain | RUNNING | 10.0.3.89 (eth0) | | NO | 0 |
+-------------------------+---------+-------------------+------+-----------+-----------+

Super easy, right?

Cheers,
:-Dustin

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