Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'work'

David Murphy (schwuk)

Ars Technica has a great write up by Lee Hutchinson on our Orange Box demo and training unit.

You can't help but have your attention grabbed by it!

You can’t help but have your attention grabbed by it!

As the comments are quick to point out – at the expense of the rest of the piece – the hardware isn’t the compelling story here. While you can buy your own, you can almost certainly hand build an equivalent-or-better set up for less money1, but Ars recognises this:

Of course, that’s exactly the point: the Orange Box is that taste of heroin that the dealer gives away for free to get you on board. And man, is it attractive. However, as Canonical told me about a dozen times, the company is not making them to sell—it’s making them to use as revenue driving opportunities and to quickly and effectively demo Canonical’s vision of the cloud.

The Orange Box is about showing off MAAS & Juju, and – usually – OpenStack.

To see what Ars think of those, you should read the article.

I definitely echo Lee’s closing statement:

I wish my closet had an Orange Box in it. That thing is hella cool.


  1. Or make one out of wood like my colleague Gavin did! 

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David Murphy (schwuk)

This is really inspiring to me, on several levels: as an Ubuntu member, as a Canonical, and as a school governor.

Not only are they deploying Ubuntu and other open-source software to their students, they are encouraging those students to tinker with their laptops, and – better yet – some of those same students are directly involved in the development, distribution, and providing support for their peers. All of those students will take incredibly valuable experience with them into their future careers.

Well done.

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Michael Hall

A couple of months ago Jono announced the dates for the Ubuntu Online Summit, June 10th – 12th,  and those dates are almost upon us now.  The schedule is opened, the track leads are on board, all we need now are sessions.  And that’s where you come in.

Ubuntu Online Summit is a change for us, we’re trying to mix the previous online UDS events with our Open Week, Developer Week and User Days events, to try and bring people from every part of our community together to celebrate, educate, and improve Ubuntu. So in addition to the usual planning sessions we had at UDS, we’re also looking for presentations from our various community teams on the work they do, walk-throughs for new users learning how to use Ubuntu, as well as instructional sessions to help new distro developers, app developers, and cloud devops get the most out of it as a platform.

What we need from you are sessions.  It’s open to anybody, on any topic, anyway you want to do it.  The only requirement is that you can start and run a Google+ OnAir Hangout, since those are what provide the live video streaming and recording for the event.  There are two ways you can propose a session: the first is to register a Blueprint in Launchpad, this is good for planning session that will result in work items, the second is to propose a session directly in Summit, which is good for any kind of session.  Instructions for how to do both are available on the UDS Website.

There will be Track Leads available to help you get your session on the schedule, and provide some technical support if you have trouble getting your session’s hangout setup. When you propose your session (or create your Blueprint), try to pick the most appropriate track for it, that will help it get approved and scheduled faster.

Ubuntu Development

Many of the development-oriented tracks from UDS have been rolled into the Ubuntu Development track. So anything that would previously have been in Client, Core/Foundations or Cloud and Server will be in this one track now. The track leads come from all parts of Ubuntu development, so whatever you session’s topic there will be a lead there who will be familiar with it.

Track Leads:

  • ?ukasz Zemczak
  • Steve Langasek
  • Leann Ogasawara
  • Antonio Rosales
  • Marc Deslaurs

Application Development

Introduced a few cycles back, the Application Development track will continue to have a focus on improving the Ubuntu SDK, tools and documentation we provide for app developers.  We also want to introduce sessions focused on teaching app development using the SDK, the various platform services available, as well as taking a deeper dive into specifics parts of the Ubuntu UI Toolkit.

Track Leads:

  • Michael Hall
  • David Planella
  • Alan Pope
  • Zsombor Egri
  • Nekhelesh Ramananthan

Cloud DevOps

This is the counterpart of the Application Development track for those with an interest in the cloud.  This track will have a dual focus on planning improvements to the DevOps tools like Juju, as well as bringing DevOps up to speed with how to use them in their own cloud deployments.  Learn how to write charms, create bundles, and manage everything in a variety of public and private clouds.

Track Leads:

  • Jorge Castro
  • Marco Ceppi
  • Patricia Gaughen
  • Jose Antonio Rey

Community

The community track has been a stable of UDS for as long as I can remember, and it’s still here in the Ubuntu Online Summit.  However, just like the other tracks, we’re looking beyond just planning ways to improve the community structure and processes.  This time we also want to have sessions showing users how they can get involved in the Ubuntu community, what teams are available, and what tools they can use in the process.

Track Leads:

  • Daniel Holbach
  • Jose Antonio Rey
  • Laura Czajkowski
  • Svetlana Belkin
  • Pablo Rubianes

Users

This is a new track and one I’m very excited about. We are all users of Ubuntu, and whether we’ve been using it for a month or a decade, there are still things we can all learn about it. The focus of the Users track is to highlight ways to get the most out of Ubuntu, on your laptop, your phone or your server.  From detailed how-to sessions, to tips and tricks, and more, this track can provide something for everybody, regardless of skill level.

Track Leads:

  • Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph
  • Nicholas Skaggs
  • Valorie Zimmerman

So once again, it’s time to get those sessions in.  Visit this page to learn how, then start thinking of what you want to talk about during those three days.  Help the track leads out by finding more people to propose more sessions, and let’s get that schedule filled out. I look forward to seeing you all at our first ever Ubuntu Online Summit.

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Michael Hall

I’ve just finished the last day of a week long sprint for Ubuntu application development. There were many people here, designers, SDK developers, QA folks and, which excited me the most, several of the Core Apps developers from our community!

image20140520_0048I haven’t been in attendance at many conferences over the past couple of years, and without an in-person UDS I haven’t had a chance to meetup and hangout with anybody outside of my own local community. So this was a very nice treat for me personally to spend the week with such awesome and inspiring contributors.

It wasn’t a vacation though, sprints are lots of work, more work than UDS.  All of us were jumping back and forth between high information density discussions on how to implement things, and then diving into some long heads-down work to get as much implemented as we could. It was intense, and now we’re all quite tired, but we all worked together well.

I was particularly pleased to see the community guys jumping right in and thriving in what could have very easily been an overwhelming event. Not only did they all accomplish a lot of work, fix a lot of bugs, and implement some new features, but they also gave invaluable feedback to the developers of the toolkit and tools. They never cease to amaze me with their talent and commitment.

It was a little bitter-sweet though, as this was also the last sprint with Jono at the head of the community team.  As most of you know, Jono is leaving Canonical to join the XPrize foundation.  It is an exciting opportunity to be sure, but his experience and his insights will be sorely missed by the rest of us. More importantly though he is a friend to so many of us, and while we are sad to see him leave, we wish him all the best and can’t wait to hear about the things he will be doing in the future.

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Michael Hall

Bicentennial Man PosterEver since we started building the Ubuntu SDK, we’ve been trying to find ways of bringing the vast number of Android apps that exist over to Ubuntu. As with any new platform, there’s a chasm between Android apps and native apps that can only be crossed through the effort of porting.

There are simple solutions, of course, like providing an Android runtime on Ubuntu. On other platforms, those have shown to present Android apps as second-class citizens that can’t benefit from a new platform’s unique features. Worse, they don’t provide a way for apps to gradually become first-class citizens, so chasm between Android and native still exists, which means the vast majority of apps supported this way will never improve.

There are also complicates solutions, like code conversion, that try to translate Android/Java code into the native platform’s language and toolkit, preserving logic and structure along the way. But doing this right becomes such a monumental task that making a tool to do it is virtually impossible, and the amount of cleanup and checking needed to be done by an actual developer quickly rises to the same level of effort as a manual port would have. This approach also fails to take advantage of differences in the platforms, and will re-create the old way of doing things even when it doesn’t make sense on the new platform.

Screenshot from 2014-04-19 14:44:22NDR takes a different approach to these, it doesn’t let you run our Android code on Ubuntu, nor does it try to convert your Android code to native code. Instead NDR will re-create the general framework of your Android app as a native Ubuntu app, converting Activities to Pages, for example, to give you a skeleton project on which you can build your port. It won’t get you over the chasm, but it’ll show you the path to take and give you a head start on it. You will just need to fill it in with the logic code to make it behave like your Android app. NDR won’t provide any of logic for you, and chances are you’ll want to do it slightly differently than you did in Android anyway, due to the differences between the two platforms.

Screenshot from 2014-04-19 14:44:31To test NDR during development, I chose the Telegram app because it was open source, popular, and largely used Android’s layout definitions and components. NDR will be less useful against apps such as games, that use their own UI components and draw directly to a canvas, but it’s pretty good at converting apps that use Android’s components and UI builder.

After only a couple days of hacking I was able to get NDR to generate enough of an Ubuntu SDK application that, with a little bit of manual cleanup, it was recognizably similar to the Android app’s.

This proves, in my opinion, that bootstrapping an Ubuntu port based on Android source code is not only possible, but is a viable way of supporting Android app developers who want to cross that chasm and target their apps for Ubuntu as well. I hope it will open the door for high-quality, native Ubuntu app ports from the Android ecosystem.  There is still much more NDR can do to make this easier, and having people with more Android experience than me (that would be none) would certainly make it a more powerful tool, so I’m making it a public, open source project on Launchpad and am inviting anybody who has an interest in this to help me improve it.

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olli

Ubuntu 14.04 will be released today and you couldn’t resist the itch to go try the Unity 8 preview session on the Desktop. How underwhelming… there are almost no apps, and some don’t even work and overall it’s actually pretty unexciting… let’s change that in the next few chapters. First things first though… let’s look […]

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Michael Hall

Screenshot from 2014-03-20 21:57:06Yesterday we made a big step towards developing a native email client for Ubuntu, which uses the Ubuntu UI Toolkit and will converge between between phones, tablets and the desktop from the start.

We’re not starting from scratch though, we’re building on top of the incredible work done in the Trojitá project.  Trojitá provides a fast, light email client built with Qt, which made it ideal for using with Ubuntu. And yesterday, the first of that work was accepted into upstream, you can now build an Ubuntu Components front end to Trojitá.

None of this would have been possible without the help up Trojitá’s upstream developer Jan Kundrát, who patiently helped me learn the codebase, and also the basics of CMake and Git so that I could make this first contribution. It also wouldn’t have been possible without the existing work by Ken VanDine and Joseph Mills, who both worked on the build configuration and some initial QML code that I used. Thanks also to Dan Chapman for working together with me to get this contribution into shape and accepted upstream.

This is just the start, now comes the hard work of actually building the new UI with the Ubuntu UI Toolkit.  Andrea Del Sarto has provided some fantastic UI mockups already which we can use as a start, but there’s still a need for a more detailed visual and UX design.  If you want to be part of that work, I’ve documented how to get the code and how to contribute on the EmailClient wiki.  You can also join the next IRC meeting at 1400 UTC today in #ubuntu-touch-meeting on Freenode.

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David Murphy (schwuk)

Today I was adding tox and Travis-CI support to a Django project, and I ran into a problem: our project doesn’t have a setup.py. Of course I could have added one, but since by convention we don’t package our Django projects (Django applications are a different story) – instead we use virtualenv and pip requirements files - I wanted to see if I could make tox work without changing our project.

Turns out it is quite easy: just add the following three directives to your tox.ini.

In your [tox] section tell tox not to run setup.py:

skipsdist = True

In your [testenv] section make tox install your requirements (see here for more details):

deps = -r{toxinidir}/dev-requirements.txt

Finally, also in your [testenv] section, tell tox how to run your tests:

commands = python manage.py test

Now you can run tox, and your tests should run!

For reference, here is a the complete (albeit minimal) tox.ini file I used:

[tox]
envlist = py27
skipsdist = True

[testenv]
deps = -r{toxinidir}/dev-requirements.txt
setenv =
    PYTHONPATH = {toxinidir}:{toxinidir}
commands = python manage.py test

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David Murphy (schwuk)

Zach Holman writes about how GitHub communicates:

here’s a look at most of the communication that happened at GitHub on one random recent day: February 4, 2014

The expected methods are all there: chat (Campfire in their case), email, and – of course - GitHub itself.

One thing that piqued my interest was their internal-only social network “Team” which seems very reminiscent of how Automattic use WordPress & P2. Since I learned how Automattic use P2, I’ve been wondering if we could do something similar at Canonical. Perhaps we could use Google+  for this as we already use it for internal HangoutsUbuntu Developer Summit, and to power Ubuntu On-Air. There are ways to limit Google+ communities to members of your Google Apps domain.

(Side note: I hate having two Google+ accounts!)

I really need to finish coalescing my thoughts and put them into their own post…

The other point I noted was that their use of email was both minimal and individual – Team and GitHub itself are their primary ways of disseminating information.

It always interesting to see how others do achieve similar goals to yourself.

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David Murphy (schwuk)

Zach Holman writes about how GitHub communicates:

here’s a look at most of the communication that happened at GitHub on one random recent day: February 4, 2014

The expected methods are all there: chat (Campfire in their case), email, and – of course – GitHub itself.

One thing that piqued my interest was their internal-only social network “Team” which seems very reminiscent of how Automattic use WordPress & P2. Since I learned how Automattic use P2, I’ve been wondering if we could do something similar at Canonical. Perhaps we could use Google+  for this as we already use it for internal Hangouts, Ubuntu Developer Summit, and to power Ubuntu On-Air. There are ways to limit Google+ communities to members of your Google Apps domain.

(Side note: I hate having two Google+ accounts!)

I really need to finish coalescing my thoughts and put them into their own post…

The other point I noted was that their use of email was both minimal and individual – Team and GitHub itself are their primary ways of disseminating information.

It always interesting to see how others do achieve similar goals to yourself.

The post How GitHub communicates appeared first on David Murphy.

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olli

Mir and Chromium

Ubuntu’s Display Server Mir is gaining more and more traction and the team is making good progress on the platforms that are at the core of Ubuntu. Mir is proving itself everyday to be the exact technology that Ubuntu needs to power mobile devices. Mir’s features are on par with the requirements that we put […]

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Michael Hall

Starting at 1400 UTC today, and continuing all week long, we will be hosting a series of online classes covering many aspects of Ubuntu application development. We have experts both from Canonical and our always amazing community who will be discussing the Ubuntu SDK, QML and HTML5 development, as well as the new Click packaging and app store.

You can find the full schedule here: http://summit.ubuntu.com/appdevweek-1403/

We’re using a new format for this year’s app developer week.  As you can tell from the link above, we’re using the Summit website.  It will work much like the virtual UDS, where each session will have a page containing an embedded YouTube video that will stream the presenter’s hangout, an embedded IRC chat window that will log you into the correct channel, and an Etherpad document where the presenter can post code examples, notes, or any other text.

Use the chatroom like you would an Ubuntu On Air session, start your questions with “QUESTION:” and wait for the presenter to get to it. After the session is over, the recorded video will be available on that page for you to replay later. If you register yourself as attending on the website (requires a Launchpad profile), you can mark yourself as attending those sessions you are interested in, and Summit can then give you a personalize schedule as well as an ical feed you can subscribe to in your calendar.

If you want to use the embedded Etherpad, make sure you’re a member of https://launchpad.net/~ubuntu-etherpad

That’s it!  Enjoy the session, ask good questions, help others when you can, and happy hacking.

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Michael Hall

It’s been a crazy busy week, and it’s only Tuesday (as of this writing)!  Because I’m exhausted, this is going to be a short post listing the things that are new.

New Roof

I wrote earlierthat I was having a new roof put on my house.  Well that all starter unceremoniously at 7:30am on Monday, and the hammering over my head has been going on non-stop for two full working days.  Everybody who joined me on a Google+ Hangout has been regaled with the sounds of my torment.  It looks nice though, so there’s that.

New Developer Portal

Well, new-ish.  We heavily revamped the Apps section to include more walk-through content to help new Ubuntu app developers learn the tools, the process and the platform.  If you haven’t been there yet, you really should give it a read and get yourself started: http://developer.ubuntu.com/apps/

New HTML5 APIs

In addition to the developer portal itself, I was able to publish new HTML5 API docs for the 14.04 release of Ubuntu.  Not only does this include the UbuntuUI library from the previous release, it also introduced new platform APIs for Content Hub, Online Accounts and Alarms, with more platform APIs coming soon.  The Cordova 3.4 API docs are proving harder to parse and upload than I anticipated, but I will hopefully have them published soon. If you’re an HTML5 app developer, you’ll be interested in these: http://developer.ubuntu.com/api/html5/sdk-14.04/

New Scopes

While not exactly a secret, we did start to make some noise about the new Scopes framework and Unity Dash that bring in a lot of improvements. As much as I liked the Home lens searching everything and aggregating results, it just wasn’t reaching the potential we had hoped for it.  The new setup will allow scopes to add more information that is specific to their result types, control how those results are displayed, and more clearly brand themselves to let the user know what’s being searched. You can read more about the enhancements at http://developer.ubuntu.com/2014/02/introducing-our-new-scopes-technology/ Like I said, it’s been a crazy busy week.  And we’re not done yet!

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Michael Hall

Ubuntu API Website

For much of the past year I’ve been working on the Ubuntu API Website, a Django project for hosting all of the API documentation for the Ubuntu SDK, covering a variety of languages, toolkits and libraries.  It’s been a lot of work for just one person, to make it really awesome I’m going to need help from you guys and gals in the community.

To help smooth the onramp to getting started, here is a breakdown of the different components in the site and how they all fit together.  You should grab a copy of the branch from Launchpad so you can follow along by running: bzr branch lp:ubuntu-api-website

Django

First off, let’s talk about the framework.  The API website uses Django, a very popular Python webapp framework that’s also used by other community-run Ubuntu websites, such as Summit and the LoCo Team Portal, which makes it a good fit. A Django project consists of one or more Django “apps”, which I will cover below.  Each app consists of “models”, which use the Django ORM (Object-Relational Mapping) to handle all of the database interactions for us, so we can stick to just Python and not worry about SQL.  Apps also have “views”, which are classes or functions that are called when a URL is requested.  Finally, Django provides a default templating engine that views can use to produce HTML.

If you’re not familiar with Django already, you should take the online Tutorial.  It only takes about an hour to go through it all, and by the end you’ll have learned all of the fundamental things about building a Django site.

Branch Root

When you first get the branch you’ll see one folder and a handful of files.  The folder, developer_network, is the Django project root, inside there is all of the source code for the website.  Most of your time is going to be spent in there.

Also in the branch root you’ll find some files that are used for managing the project itself. Most important of these is the README file, which gives step by step instructions for getting it running on your machine. You will want to follow these instructions before you start changing code. Among the instructions is using the requirements.txt file, also in the branch root, to setup a virtualenv environment.  Virtualenv lets you create a Python runtime specifically for this project, without it conflicting with your system-wide Python installation.

The other files you can ignore for now, they’re used for packaging and deploying the site, you won’t need them during development.

./developer_network/

As I mentioned above, this folder is the Django project root.  It has sub-folders for each of the Django apps used by this project. I will go into more detail on each of these apps below.

This folder also contains three important files for Django: manage.py, urls.py and settings.py

manage.py is used for a number of commands you can give to Django.  In the README you’ll have seen it used to call syncdbmigrate and initdb.  These create the database tables, apply any table schema changes, and load them with initial data. These commands only need to be run once.  It also has you run collectstatic and runserver. The first collects static files (images, css, javascript, etc) from all of the apps and puts them all into a single ./static/ folder in the project root, you’ll need to run that whenever you change one of those files in an app.  The second, runserver, runs a local HTTP server for your app, this is very handy during development when you don’t want to be bothered with a full Apache server. You can run this anytime you want to see your site “live”.

settings.py contains all of the Django configuration for the project.  There’s too much to go into detail on here, and you’ll rarely need to touch it anyway.

urls.py is the file that maps URLs to an application’s views, it’s basically a list of regular-expressions that try to match the requested URL, and a python function or class to call for that match. If you took the Django project tutorial I recommended above, you should have a pretty good understanding of what it does. If you ever add a new view, you’ll need to add a corresponding line to this file in order for Django to know about it. If you want to know what view handles a given URL, you can just look it up here.

./developer_network/ubuntu_website/

If you followed the README in the branch root, the first thing it has you do is grab another bzr branch and put it in ./developer_network/ubuntu_website.  This is a Django app that does nothing more than provide a base template for all of your project’s pages. It’s generic enough to be used by other Django-powered websites, so it’s kept in a separate branch that each one can pull from.  It’s rare that you’ll need to make changes in here, but if you do just remember that you need to push you changes branch to the ubuntu-community-webthemes project on Launchpad.

./developer_network/rest_framework/

This is a 3rd party Django app that provides the RESTful JSON API for the site. You should not make changes to this app, since that would put us out of sync with the upstream code, and would make it difficult to pull in updates from them in the future.  All of the code specific to the Ubuntu API Website’s services are in the developer_network/service/ app.

./developer_network/search/

This app isn’t being used yet, but it is intended for giving better search functionality to the site. There are some models here already, but nothing that is being used.  So if searching is your thing, this is the app you’ll want to work in.

./developer_network/related/

This is another app that isn’t being used yet, but is intended to allow users to link additional content to the API documentation. This is one of the major goals of the site, and a relatively easy area to get started contributing. There are already models defined for code snippets, Images and links. Snippets and Links should be relatively straightforward to implement. Images will be a little harder, because the site runs on multiple instances in the cloud, and each instance will need access to the image, so we can’t just use the Django default of saving them to local files. This is the best place for you to make an impact on the site.

./developer_network/common/

The common app provides views for logging in and out of the app, as well as views for handling 404 and 500 errors when the arise.  It also provides some base models the site’s page hierarchy. This starts with a Topic at the top, which would be qml or html5 in our site, followed by a Version which lets us host different sets of docs for the different supported releases of Ubuntu. Finally each set of docs is placed within a Section, such as Graphical Interface or Platform Service to help the user browse them based on use.

./developer_network/apidocs/

This app provides models that correspond directly to pieces of documentation that are being imported.  Documentation can be imported either as an Element that represents a specific part of the API, such as a class or function, or as a Page that represents long-form text on how to use the Elements themselves.  Each one of these may also have a given Namespace attached to it, if the imported language supports it, to further categorize them.

./developer_network/web/

Finally we get into the app that is actually generates the pages.  This app has no models, but uses the ones defined in the common and apidocs apps.  This app defines all of the views and templates used by the website’s pages, so no matter what you are working on there’s a good chance you’ll need to make changes in here too. The templates defined here use the ones in ubuntu_website as a base, and then add site and page specific markup for each.

Getting Started

If you’re still reading this far down, congratulations! You have all the information you need to dive in and start turning a boring but functional website into a dynamic, collaborative information hub for Ubuntu app developers. But you don’t need to go it alone, I’m on IRC all the time, so come find me (mhall119) in #ubuntu-website or #ubuntu-app-devel on Freenode and let me know where you want to start. If you don’t do IRC, leave a comment below and I’ll respond to it. And of course you can find the project, file bugs (or pick bugs to fix) and get the code all from the Launchpad project.

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olli

With UDS just around the corner (11-13 March 2014, 2pm-8pm UTC) we wanted to give you a quick update where things stand in the 14.04 cycle. The teams have been busy working towards the goals for the 14.04 cycle, with a focus on the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release, the App Developer Program and of course Ubuntu for Phones. […]

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Michael Hall

Today was a distracting day for me.  My homeowner’s insurance is requiring that I get my house re-roofed[1], so I’ve had contractors coming and going all day to give me estimates. Beyond just the cost, we’ve been checking on state licensing, insurance, etc.  I’ve been most shocked at the differences in the level of professionalism from them, you can really tell the ones for whom it is a business, and not just a job.

But I still managed to get some work done today.  After a call with Francis Ginther about the API website importers, we should soon be getting regular updates to the current API docs as soon as their source branch is updated.  I will of course make a big announcement when that happens

I didn’t have much time to work on my Debian contributions today, though I did join the DPMT (Debian Python Modules Team) so that I could upload my new python-model-mommy package with the DPMT as the Maintainer, rather than trying to maintain this package on my own.  Big thanks to Paul Tagliamonte for walking me through all of these steps while I learn.

I’m now into my second week of UbBloPoMo posts, with 8 posts so far.  This is the point where the obligation of posting every day starts to overtake the excitement of it, but I’m going to persevere and try to make it to the end of the month.  I would love to hear what you readers, especially those coming from Planet Ubuntu, think of this effort.

[1] Re-roofing, for those who don’t know, involves removing and replacing the shingles and water-proofing paper, but leaving the plywood itself.  In my case, they’re also going to have to re-nail all of the plywood to the rafters and some other things to bring it up to date with new building codes.  Can’t be too safe in hurricane-prone Florida.

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Michael Hall

Quick overview post today, because it’s late and I don’t have anything particular to talk about today.

First of all, the next vUDS was announced today, we’re a bit late in starting it off but we wanted to have another one early enough to still be useful to the Trusty release cycle.  Read the linked mailinglist post for details about where to find the schedule and how to propose sessions.

I pushed another update to the API website today that does a better job balancing the 2-column view of namespaces and fixes the sub-nav text to match the WordPress side of things. This was the first deployment in a while to go off without a problem, thanks to  having a new staging environment created last time.  I’m hoping my deployment problems on this are now far behind me.

I took a task during my weekly Core Apps update call to look more into the Terminal app’s problem with enter and backspace keys, so I may be pinging some of you in the coming week about it to get some help.  You have been warned.

Finally, I decided a few weeks ago to spread out my after-hours community a activity beyond Ubuntu, and I’ve settled on the Debian new maintainers Django website as somewhere I can easily start.  I’ve got a git repo where I’m starting writing the first unit tests for that website, and as part of that I’m also working on Debian packaging for the Python model-mommy library which we use extensively in Ubuntu’s Django website. I’m having to learn (or learn more) Debian packaging, Git workflows and Debian’s processes and community, all of which are going to be good for me, and I’m looking forward to the challenge.

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Michael Hall

We wrapped up the last day of our sprint with a new team photo.  I can honestly say I couldn’t think of a better group of people to be working with.  Even the funny looking guy in the middle.

I mentioned that earlier in the week we decided on naming SDK releases after distro releases, and with that information in hand I spent my last day getting the latest API docs uploaded, so if you’re writing apps for the latest device images, you’ll want to use these: http://developer.ubuntu.com/api/qml/sdk-14.04/

In the coming week I’ll be working to get the documentation publishing scripts added to the automated build and testing process, so those docs will be continuously updated until the release of Ubuntu 14.04, at which point we’ll freeze those doc pages and start publishing daily updates for 14.10.  Being able to publish  all of those docs in a matter of minutes was a particularly thrill for me, after working for so long to get that feature into production.  It certainly proves that it was the right approach.

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Michael Hall

Second to last day of the sprint, and we’ve been shifting gears from presenting ideas and brainstorming to making solid plans and bringing all the disparate pieces together.  The result is looking very, very promising.

I started out this morning by updating my Nexus 4 to build 166, which brings some improvements to the Unity 8 and system apps.  I’m still poking around to discover what’s new.

I had a handful of great conversations with the Jamie (security) and Ken (content-hub) about how to deliver creative content via click packages in the new store.  It looks like wallpapers will be relatively easy to support, and Ken and I (mostly Ken) will be working on adding that to the Click installer and System Settings.  Theme support is unfortunately going to be more difficult, since our QML themes are full QML themselves, and can run their own code, which makes them a security concern. We’re going to try and support a safe subset of styling to be delivered via Click packages, but that’s not likely to happen this cycle.

After lunch we had another set of presentations, this time from Florian Boucault on the SDK team about app performance.  After briefly covering performance goals we need to meet to make our UI as smooth and responsive an iOS, he stunned us all by showing off live performance graphs overlaid on top of one of the Core Apps (sadly I didn’t get a picture of that) so you can see the CPU and GPU usages while interacting with the app.  This wonderful little piece of magic should be landing in device images in the next couple of weeks, and I for one can not wait to try it out. In the mean time, he was nice enough to sit down with me and walk me through using QtCreator’s Analyse tab to see what parts of my own app might be using more resources than then should.

Among the sessions I wasn’t able to attend today: More HTML5 device APIs are coming online, contacts syncing via the Online Accounts provider for Google got it’s first cut, the SDK’s StateSaver component got some finishing work done, and AppArmor optimizations that will speed up boot times.

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Michael Hall

Today we had a lot of good discussions around app development, starting off with an update on the state of GoLang support and what was needed to get the Go/QML bridge packaged and available for people to start using.

From there we moved on to the future of Content Hub, which is really set to reach it’s full potential now and we will hopefully see a wide range of system, core and 3rd party apps providing it with content.

After lunch Nick gave us all a quick lesson in how to properly use Autopilot, something I think we’re all going to become more familiar with in the coming months.  The key takeaway: Don’t Sleep.

Then we discussed QtCreator itself, and our various plugins for it.  We identified some easy fixes, and did a lot of brainstorming on how to attack the harder ones.  We saw the new packaging and cross-compilation support that’s being added to it now. Zoltan topped it all off by giving us a very short demonstration, going from the creation of a new project all the way, through creating a package, running package verification tests on it, copying it onto a phone and installing it, all in about 30 seconds!

We also discovered that the current SDK packages in the PPA were broken for Saucy and older releases (Trust was okay).  Daniel, Zoltan and David Barth spent much of the day intensely debugging the problem, providing a fix, shepherding those fixes though Launchpad and into the PPAs so that we could get it all working by the end of the day.  We then set aside time for a new session where we discussed what happened and what we can do to prevent it from happening again.  I’m pleased to say that some of those steps have already been implemented, and the rest will soon follow.

Finally we wrapped up the evening with chicken wings and beer, plus another fantastically entertaining card game courtesy of Alan Pope’s deranged humor.

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