Canonical Voices

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Michael Hall

Photo from Aaron Honeycutt

Nicholas Skaggs presenting at UbuCon@FOSSETCON 2014

Thanks to the generous organizers of FOSSETCON who have given us a room at their venue, we will be having another UbuCon in Orlando this fall!

FOSSETCON 2015 will be held at the Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista‎, from November 19th through the 21st. This year they’ve been able to get Richard Stallman to attend and give a keynote, so it’s certainly an event worth attending for anybody who’s interested in free and open source software.

UbuCon itself will be held all day on the 19th in it’s own dedicate room at the venue. We are currently recruiting presenters to talk to attendees about some aspect of Ubuntu, from the cloud to mobile, community involved and of course the desktop. If you have a fun or interesting topic that you want to share with, please send your proposal to me at

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Michael Hall

Ubuntu is sponsoring the South East Linux Fest this year in Charlotte North Carolina, and as part of that event we will have a room to use all day Friday, June 12, for an UbuCon. UbuCon is a mini-conference with presentations centered around Ubuntu the project and it’s community.

I’m recruiting speakers to fill the last three hour-long slots, if anybody is willing and able to attend the conference and wants to give a presentation to a room full of enthusiastic Ubuntu users, please email me at Topic can be anything Ubuntu related, design, development, client, cloud, using it, community, etc.

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Michael Hall

Ubuntu has been talking a lot about convergence lately, it’s something that we believe is going to be revolutionary and we want to be at the forefront of it. We love the idea of it, but so far we haven’t really had much experience with the reality of it.

image20150423_164034801I got my first taste of that reality two weeks ago, while at a work sprint in London. While Canonical has an office in London, it had other teams sprinting there, so the Desktop sprint I was at was instead held at a hotel. We planned to visit the office one day that week, it would be my first visit to any Canonical office, as well as my first time working at an actual office in several years. However, we also planned to meet up with the UK loco for release drinks that evening. This meant that we had to decide between leaving our laptops at the hotel, thus not having them to work on at the office, or taking them with us, but having to carry them around the pub all evening.

I chose to leave my laptop behind, but I did take my phone (Nexus 4 running Ubuntu) with me. After getting a quick tour of the office, I found a vacant seat at a desk, and pulled out my phone. Most of my day job can be done with the apps on my phone: I have email, I have a browser, I have a terminal with ssh, I can respond to our community everywhere they are active.

I spent the next couple of hours doing work, actual work, on my phone. The only problem I had was that I was doing it on a small screen, and I was burning through my battery. At one point I looked up and realized that the vacant desk I was sitting at was equipped with a laptop docking station. It had also a USB hub and an HDMI monitor cable available. If I had a slimport cable for my phone, I might have been able to plug it into this docking station and both power my phone and get a bigger screen to work with.

If I could have done that, I would have achieved the full reality of convergence, and it would have been just like if I had brought my laptop with me. Only with this I was able to simply slide it into my pocket when it was time to leave for drinks. It was tantalizingly close, I got a little taste of what it’s going to be like, and now I’m craving more of it.

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Michael Hall

A couple of weeks ago I had the opportunity to attend the thirteenth Southern California Linux Expo, more commonly known at SCaLE 13x. It was my first time back in five years, since I attended 9x, and my first time as a speaker. I had a blast at SCaLE, and a wonderful time with UbuCon. If you couldn’t make it this year, it should definitely be on your list of shows to attend in 2016.


Thanks to the efforts of Richard Gaskin, we had a room all day Friday to hold an UbuCon. For those of you who haven’t attended an UbuCon before, it’s basically a series of presentations by members of the Ubuntu community on how to use it, contribute to it, or become involved in the community around it. SCaLE was one of the pioneering host conferences for these, and this year they provided a double-sized room for us to use, which we still filled to capacity.

image20150220_100226891I was given the chance to give not one but two talks during UbuCon, one on community and one on the Ubuntu phone. We also had presentations from my former manager and good friend Jono Bacon, current coworkers Jorge Castro and Marco Ceppi, and inspirational community members Philip Ballew and Richard Gaskin.

I’d like thank Richard for putting this all together, and for taking such good care of those of us speaking (he made sure we always had mints and water). UbuCon was a huge success because of the amount of time and work he put into it. Thanks also to Canonical for providing us, on rather short notice, a box full of Ubuntu t-shirts to give away. And of course thanks to the SCaLE staff and organizers for providing us the room and all of the A/V equipment in it to use.

The room was recorded all day, so each of these sessions can be watched now on youtube. My own talks are at 4:00:00 and 5:00:00.

Ubuntu Booth

In addition to UbuCon, we also had an Ubuntu booth in the SCaLE expo hall, which was registered and operated by members of the Ubuntu California LoCo team. These guys were amazing, they ran the booth all day over all three days, managed the whole setup and tear down, and did an excellent job talking to everybody who came by and explaining everything from Ubuntu’s cloud offerings, to desktops and even showing off Ubuntu phones.

image20150221_162940413Our booth wouldn’t have happened without the efforts of Luis Caballero, Matt Mootz, Jose Antonio Rey, Nathan Haines, Ian Santopietro, George Mulak, and Daniel Gimpelevich, so thank you all so much! We also had great support from Carl Richell at System76 who let us borrow 3 of their incredible laptops running Ubuntu to show off our desktop, Canonical who loaned us 2 Nexus 4 phones running Ubuntu as well as one of the Orange Box cloud demonstration boxes, Michael Newsham from TierraTek who sent us a fanless PC and NAS, which we used to display a constantly-repeating video (from Canonical’s marketing team) showing the Ubuntu phone’s Scopes on a television monitor provided to us by Eäär Oden at Video Resources. Oh, and of course Stuart Langridge, who gave up his personal, first-edition Bq Ubuntu phone for the entire weekend so we could show it off at the booth.

image20150222_132142752Like Ubuntu itself, this booth was not the product of just one organization’s work, but the combination of efforts and resources from many different, but connected, individuals and groups. We are what we are, because of who we all are. So thank you all for being a part of making this booth amazing.

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Michael Hall

Last week was our second ever Ubuntu Online Summit, and it couldn’t have gone better. Not only was it a great chance for us in Canonical to talk about what we’re working on and get community members involved in the ongoing work, it was also an opportunity for the community to show us what they have been working on and give us an opportunity to get involved with them.

Community Track leads

This was also the second time we’ve recruited track leads from among the community. Traditionally leading a track was a responsibility given to one of the engineering managers within Canonical, and it was up to them to decide what sessions to put on the UDS schedule. We kept the same basic approach when we went to online vUDS. But starting with UOS 14.06, we asked leaders in the community to help us with that, and they’ve done a phenomenal job. This time we had Nekhelesh RamananthanJosé Antonio ReySvetlana BelkinRohan GargElfy, and Scarlett Clark take up that call, and they were instrumental in getting even more of the community involved

Community Session Hosts

uos_creatorsMore than a third of those who created sessions for this UOS were from the community, not Canonical. For comparison, in the last in-person UDS, less than a quarter of session creators were non-Canonical. The shift online has been disruptive, and we’ve tried many variations to try and find what works, but this metric shows that those efforts are starting to pay off. Community involvement, indeed community direction, is higher in these Online Summits than it was in UDS. This is becoming a true community event: community focused, community organized, and community run.

Community Initiatives

The Ubuntu Online Summit wasn’t just about the projects driven by Canonical, such as the Ubuntu desktop and phone, there were many sessions about projects started and driven by members of the community. Last week we were shown the latest development on Ubuntu MATE and KDE Plasma 5 from non-Canonical lead flavors. We saw a whole set of planning sessions for community developed Core Apps and an exciting new Component Store for app developers to share bits of code with each other. For outreach there were sessions for providing localized ISOs for loco teams and expanding the scope of the community-lead Start Ubuntu project. Finally we had someone from the community kick off a serious discussion about getting Ubuntu running on cars. Cars! All of these exciting sessions were thought up by, proposed by, and run by members of the community.

Community Improvements

This was a great Ubuntu Online Summit, and I was certainly happy with the increased level of community involvement in it, but we still have room to make it better. And we are going to make it better with help from the community. We will be sending out a survey to everyone who registered as attending for this UOS to gather feedback and ideas, please take the time to fill it out when you get the link. If you attended but didn’t register there’s still time, go to the link above, log in and save your attendance record. Finally, it’s never too early to start thinking about the next UOS and what sessions you might want to lead for it, so that you’re prepared when those track leads come knocking at your door.

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A couple of people have reached out to me via LinkedIn and reminded me that my three year work anniversary happened last Friday. Three years since I left my job at a local place to go work for the Canonical where I got the chance to be paid to work on open source software and better my Python skills with the team working on Launchpad. My wife wasn’t quite sure. “You’ve only been at your job a year and a half, and your last one was only two years. What makes this different?”

What’s amazing, looking back, is just how *right* the decision turned out to be. I was nervous at the time. I really wasn’t Launchpad’s biggest fan. However, the team I interviewed with held this promise of making me a better developer. They were doing code reviews of every branch that went up to land. They had automated testing, and they firmly believed in unit and functional tests of the code. It was a case of the product didn’t excite me, but the environment, working with smart developers from across the globe, was exactly what I felt like I needed to move forward with my career, my craft.

2013-09-02 18.17.47

I joined my team on Launchpad in a squad of four other developers. It was funny. When I joined I felt so lost. Launchpad is an amazing and huge bit of software, and I knew I was in over my head. I talked with my manager at the time, Deryck, and he told me “Don’t worry, it’ll take you about a year to get really productive working on Launchpad.” A year! Surely you jest, and if you’re not jesting…wtf did I just get myself into?

It was a long road and over time I learned how to take a code review (a really hard skill for many of us), how to do one, and how to talk with other smart and opinionated developers. I learned the value of the daily standup, how to manage work across a kanban board. I learned to really learn from others. Up until this point I’d always been the big fish in a small pond and suddenly I was the minnow hiding in the shallows. Forget books on how to code, just look at the diff in the code review you’re reading right now. Learn!

My boss was right, it was nearly ten months before I really felt like I could be asked to do most things in Launchpad and get them done in an efficient way. Soon our team was moved on from Launchpad to other projects. It was actually pretty great. On the one hand, “Hey! I just got the hang of this thing” but, on the other hand, we were moving on to new things. Development life here has never been one of sitting still. We sit down and work on the Ubuntu cycle of six month plans, and it’s funny because even that is such a long time. Do you really know what you’ll be doing six months from now?


Since that time in Launchpad I’ve gotten work on several different projects and I ended up switching teams to work on the Juju Gui. I didn’t really know a lot about this Juju thing, but the Gui was a fascinating project. It’s a really large scale JavaScript application. This is no “toss some jQuery on a web page” thing here.

I also moved to work under a new manager Gary. As my second manager since starting at Canonical and I was amazed at my luck. Here I’ve had two great mentors that made huge strides in teaching me how to work with other developers, how to do the fun stuff, the mundane, and how to take pride in the accomplishments of the team. I sit down at my computer every day and I’ve got the brain power of amazing people at my disposal over irc, Google Hangouts, email, and more. It’s amazing to think that at these sprints we do, I’m pretty much never the smartest person in the room. However, that’s what’s so great. It’s never boring and when there’s a problem the key is that we put our joint brilliant minds to the problem. In every hard problem we’ve faced I’ve never found that a single person had the one true solution. What we come up with together is always better than what any of us had apart.

When Gary left and there was a void for team lead and it was something I was interested in. I really can’t say enough awesome things about the team of folks I work with. I wanted to keep us all together and I felt like it would be great for us to try to keep things going. It was kind of a “well I’ll just try not to $#@$@# it up” situation. That was more than nine months ago now. Gary and Deryck taught me so much, and I still have to bite my tongue and ask myself “What would Gary do” at times. I’ve kept some things the same, but I’ve also brought my own flavor into the team a bit, at least I like to think so. These days my Github profile doesn’t show me landing a branch a day, but I take great pride in the progress of the team as a whole each and every week.

The team I run now is as awesome a group of people, the best I could hope to work for. I do mean that, I work for my team. It’s never the other way around and that’s one lesson I definitely picked up from my previous leads. The projects we’re working on are exciting and new and are really important to Canonical. I get to sit in and have discussions and planning meetings with Canonical super genius veterans like Kapil, Gustavo, and occasionally Mark Shuttleworth himself.

Looking back I’ve spent the last three years becoming a better developer, getting an on the job training course on leading a team of brilliant people, and crash course on thinking about the project, not just as the bugs or features for the week, but for the project as it needs to exist in three to six months. I’ve spent three years bouncing between “what have I gotten myself into, this is beyond my abilities” to “I’ve got this. You can’t find someone else to do this better”. I always tell people that if you’re not swimming as hard as you can to keep up, find another job. I feel like three years ago I did that and I’ve been swimming ever since.


Three years is a long time in a career these days. It’s been a wild ride and I can’t thank the folks that let me in the door, taught me, and have given me the power to do great things with my work enough. I’ve worked by butt off in Budapest, Copenhagen, Cape Town, Brussels, North Carolina, London, Vegas, and the bay area a few times. Will I be here three years from now? Who knows, but I know I’ve got an awesome team to work with on Monday and we’ll be building an awesome product to keep building. I’m going to really enjoy doing work that’s challenging and fulfilling every step of the way.


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Michael Hall

Next week we will be kicking off the November 2014 Ubuntu Online Summit where people from the Ubuntu community and Canonical will be hosting live video sessions talking about what is being worked on, what is currently available, and what the future holds across all of the Ubuntu ecosystem.

uos_scheduleWe are in the process of recruiting sessions and filling out the Summit Schedule for this event, which should be finalized at the start of next week. You can register that you are attending on the Summit website, where you can also mark specific sessions that you are interested in and get a personalized view of your schedule (and an available iCal feed too!) UOS is designed for participation, not just consumption. Every session will have active IRC channel that goes along with it where you can speak directly to the people on video. For discussion sessions, you’re encouraged to join the video yourself when you want to join the conversation.

Moreover, we want you to host sessions! Anybody who has an idea for a good topic for conversation, presentation, or planning and is willing to host the video (meaning you need to run a Google On-Air Hangout) can propose a session. You don’t need to be a Canonical employee, project leader, or even an Ubuntu member to run a session, all you need is a topic and a willingness to be the person to drive it. And don’t worry, we have track leads who have volunteered to help you get it setup.

These sessions will be split into tracks, so you can follow along with the topics that interest you. Or you can jump from track to track to see what everybody else in the community is doing. And if you want to host a session yourself, you can contact any one of the friendly Track Leads, who will help you get it registered and on the schedule.

Ubuntu Development

Those who have participated in the Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) in the past will find the same kind of platform-focused topics and discussions in the Ubuntu Development track. This track covers everything from the kernel to packaging, desktops and all of the Ubuntu flavors.

The track leads are: Will CookeŁukasz ZemczakSteve LangasekAntonio Rosales, and Rohan Garg

App & Scope Development

For developers who are targeting the Ubuntu platform, for both apps and Unity scopes, we will be featuring a number of presentations on the current state of the tools, APIs and documentation, as well as gathering feedback from those who have been using them to help us improve upon them in Ubuntu 15.04. You will also see a lot of planning for the Ubuntu Core Apps, and some showcases of other apps or technologies that developers are creating.

The track leads are: Tim PeetersMichael HallAlan Pope, and Nekhelesh Ramananthan

Cloud & DevOps

Going beyond the core and client side, Ubuntu is making a lot of waves in the cloud and server market these days, and there’s no better place to learn about what we’re building (and help us build it) that the Cloud & Devops track. Whether you want to roll out your own OpenStack cloud, or make your web service easy to deploy and scale out, you will find topics here that interest you.

The track leads are: Antonio RosalesMarco CeppiPatricia Gaughen, and José Antonio Rey


The Ubuntu Online Summit is itself a community coordinated event, and we’ve got a track dedicated to helping us improve and grow the whole community. You can use this to showcase the amazing work that your team has been doing, or plan out new events and projects for the coming cycle. The Community Team from canonical will be there, as well as members of the various councils, flavors and boards that provide governance for the Ubuntu project.

The track leads are: David PlanellaDaniel HolbachSvetlana Belkin, and José Antonio Rey


And of course we can’t forget about our millions or users, we have a whole track setup just to provide them with resources and presentations that will help them make the most out Ubuntu. If you have been working on a project for Ubuntu, you should think about hosting a session on this track to show it off. We’ll also be hosting several feedback session to hear directly from users about what works, what doesn’t, and how we can improve.

The track leads are: Nicholas SkaggsElfy, and Scarlett Clark

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Michael Hall

Will CookeThis is a guest post from Will Cooke, the new Desktop Team manager at Canonical. It’s being posted here while we work to get a blog setup on, which is where you can find out more about Unity 8 and how to get involved with it.


Understandably, most of the Ubuntu news recently has focused around phones. There is a lot of excitement and anticipation building around the imminent release of the first devices.  However, the Ubuntu Desktop has not been dormant during this time.  A lot of thought and planning has been given to what the desktop will become in the future; who will use it and what will they use it for.  All the work which is going in to the phone will be directly applicable to the desktop as well, since they will use the same code.  All the apps, the UI tweaks, everything which makes applications secure and stable will all directly apply to the desktop as well.  The plan is to have the single converged operating system ready for use on the desktop by 16.04.

The plan

We learned some lessons during the early development of Unity 7. Here’s what happened:

  • 11.04: New Unity as default
  • 11.10: New Unity version
  • 12.04: Unity in First LTS

What we’ve decided to do this time is to keep the same, stable Unity 7 desktop as the default while we offer users who want to opt-in to Unity8 an option to use that desktop. As development continues the Unity 8 desktop will get better and better.  It will benefit from a lot of the advances which have come about through the development of the phone OS and will benefit from continual improvements as the releases happen.

  • 14.04 LTS: Unity 7 default / Unity 8 option for the first time
  • 14.10: Unity 7 default / Unity 8 new rev as an option
  • 15.04: Unity 7 default / Unity 8 new rev as an option
  • 15.10: Potentially Unity 8 default / Unity 7 as an option
  • 16.04 LTS: Unity 8 default / Unity 7 as an option

As you can see, this gives us a full 2 cycles (in addition to the one we’ve already done) to really nail Unity 8 with the level of quality that people expect. So what do we have?

How will we deliver Unity 8 with better quality than 7?

Continuous Integration is the best way for us to achieve and maintain the highest quality possible.  We have put a lot of effort in to automating as much of the testing as we can, the best testing is that which is performed easily.  Before every commit the changes get reviewed and approved – this is the first line of defense against bugs.  Every merge request triggers a run of the tests, the second line of defense against bugs and regressions – if a change broke something we find out about it before it gets in to the build.

The CI process builds everything in a “silo”, a self contained & controlled environment where we find out if everything works together before finally landing in the image.

And finally, we have a large number of tests which run against those images. This really is a “belt and braces” approach to software quality and it all happens automatically.  You can see, we are taking the quality of our software very seriously.

What about Unity 7?

Unity 7 and Compiz have a team dedicated to maintenance and bug fixes and so the quality of it continues to improve with every release.  For example; windows switching workspaces when a monitor gets unplugged is fixed, if you have a mouse with 6 buttons it works, support for the new version of Metacity (incase you want to use the Gnome2 desktop) – added (and incidentally, a lot of that work was done by a community contributor – thanks Alberts!)

Unity 7 is the desktop environment for a lot of software developers, devops gurus, cloud platform managers and millions of users who rely on it to help them with their everyday computing.  We don’t want to stop you being able to get work done.  This is why we continue to maintain Unity 7 while we develop Unity 8.  If you want to take Unity 8 for a spin and see how its coming along then you can; if you want to get your work done, we’re making that experience better for you every day.  Best of all, both of these options are available to you with no detriment to the other.

Things that we’re getting in the new Ubuntu Desktop

  1. Applications decoupled from the OS updates.  Traditionally a given release of Ubuntu has shipped with the versions of the applications available at the time of release.  Important updates and security fixes are back-ported to older releases where required, but generally you had to wait for the next release to get the latest and greatest set of applications.  The new desktop packaging system means that application developers can push updates out when they are ready and the user can benefit right away.
  2. Application isolation.  Traditionally applications can access anything the user can access; photos, documents, hardware devices, etc.  On other platforms this has led to data being stolen or rendered otherwise unusable.  Isolation means that without explicit permission any Click packaged application is prevented from accessing data you don’t want it to access.
  3. A full SDK for writing Ubuntu apps.  The SDK which many people are already using to write apps for the phone will allow you to write apps for the desktop as well.  In fact, your apps will be write once run anywhere – you don’t need to write a “desktop” app or a “phone” app, just an Ubuntu app.

What we have now

The easiest way to try out the Unity 8 Desktop Preview is to use the daily Ubuntu Desktop Next live image:   This will allow you to boot into a Unity 8 session without touching your current installation.  An easy 10 step way to write this image to a USB stick is:

  1. Download the ISO
  2. Insert your USB stick in the knowledge that it’s going to get wiped
  3. Open the “Disks” application
  4. Choose your USB stick and click on the cog icon on the righthand side
  5. Choose “Restore Disk Image”
  6. Browse to and select the ISO you downloaded in #1
  7. Click “Start restoring”
  8. Wait
  9. Boot and select “Try Ubuntu….”
  10. Done *

* Please note – there is currently a bug affecting the Unity 8 greeter which means you are not automatically logged in when you boot the live image.  To log in you need to:

  1. Switch to vt1 (ctrl-alt-f1)
  2. type “passwd” and press enter
  3. press enter again to set the current password to blank
  4. enter a new password twice
  5. Check that the password has been successfully changed
  6. Switch back to vt7 (ctrl-alt-f7)
  7. Enter the new password to login


Here are some screenshots showing what Unity 8 currently looks like on the desktop:


The team

The people working on the new desktop are made up of a few different disciplines.  We have a team dedicated to Unity 7 maintenance and bug fixes who are also responsible for Unity 8 on the desktop and feed in a lot of support to the main Unity 8 & Mir teams. We have the Ubuntu Desktop team who are responsible for many aspects of the underlying technologies used such as GNOME libraries, settings, printing etc as well as the key desktop applications such as Libreoffice and Chromium.  The Ubuntu desktop team has some of the longest serving members of the Ubuntu family, with some people having been here for the best part of ten years.

How you can help

We need to log all the bugs which need to be fixed in order to make Unity 8 the best desktop there is.  Firstly, we need people to test the images and log bugs.  If developers want to help fix those bugs, so much the better.  Right now we are focusing on identifying where the work done for the phone doesn’t work as expected on the desktop.  Once those bugs are logged and fixed we can rely on the CI system described above to make sure that they stay fixed.

Link to daily ISOs:


IRC:  #ubuntu-desktop on Freenode

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David Murphy (schwuk)

Ars Technica has a great write up by Lee Hutchinson on our Orange Box demo and training unit.

You can't help but have your attention grabbed by it!

You can’t help but have your attention grabbed by it!

As the comments are quick to point out – at the expense of the rest of the piece – the hardware isn’t the compelling story here. While you can buy your own, you can almost certainly hand build an equivalent-or-better set up for less money1, but Ars recognises this:

Of course, that’s exactly the point: the Orange Box is that taste of heroin that the dealer gives away for free to get you on board. And man, is it attractive. However, as Canonical told me about a dozen times, the company is not making them to sell—it’s making them to use as revenue driving opportunities and to quickly and effectively demo Canonical’s vision of the cloud.

The Orange Box is about showing off MAAS & Juju, and – usually – OpenStack.

To see what Ars think of those, you should read the article.

I definitely echo Lee’s closing statement:

I wish my closet had an Orange Box in it. That thing is hella cool.

  1. Or make one out of wood like my colleague Gavin did! 

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David Murphy (schwuk)

This is really inspiring to me, on several levels: as an Ubuntu member, as a Canonical, and as a school governor.

Not only are they deploying Ubuntu and other open-source software to their students, they are encouraging those students to tinker with their laptops, and – better yet – some of those same students are directly involved in the development, distribution, and providing support for their peers. All of those students will take incredibly valuable experience with them into their future careers.

Well done.

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Michael Hall

A couple of months ago Jono announced the dates for the Ubuntu Online Summit, June 10th – 12th,  and those dates are almost upon us now.  The schedule is opened, the track leads are on board, all we need now are sessions.  And that’s where you come in.

Ubuntu Online Summit is a change for us, we’re trying to mix the previous online UDS events with our Open Week, Developer Week and User Days events, to try and bring people from every part of our community together to celebrate, educate, and improve Ubuntu. So in addition to the usual planning sessions we had at UDS, we’re also looking for presentations from our various community teams on the work they do, walk-throughs for new users learning how to use Ubuntu, as well as instructional sessions to help new distro developers, app developers, and cloud devops get the most out of it as a platform.

What we need from you are sessions.  It’s open to anybody, on any topic, anyway you want to do it.  The only requirement is that you can start and run a Google+ OnAir Hangout, since those are what provide the live video streaming and recording for the event.  There are two ways you can propose a session: the first is to register a Blueprint in Launchpad, this is good for planning session that will result in work items, the second is to propose a session directly in Summit, which is good for any kind of session.  Instructions for how to do both are available on the UDS Website.

There will be Track Leads available to help you get your session on the schedule, and provide some technical support if you have trouble getting your session’s hangout setup. When you propose your session (or create your Blueprint), try to pick the most appropriate track for it, that will help it get approved and scheduled faster.

Ubuntu Development

Many of the development-oriented tracks from UDS have been rolled into the Ubuntu Development track. So anything that would previously have been in Client, Core/Foundations or Cloud and Server will be in this one track now. The track leads come from all parts of Ubuntu development, so whatever you session’s topic there will be a lead there who will be familiar with it.

Track Leads:

  • Łukasz Zemczak
  • Steve Langasek
  • Leann Ogasawara
  • Antonio Rosales
  • Marc Deslaurs

Application Development

Introduced a few cycles back, the Application Development track will continue to have a focus on improving the Ubuntu SDK, tools and documentation we provide for app developers.  We also want to introduce sessions focused on teaching app development using the SDK, the various platform services available, as well as taking a deeper dive into specifics parts of the Ubuntu UI Toolkit.

Track Leads:

  • Michael Hall
  • David Planella
  • Alan Pope
  • Zsombor Egri
  • Nekhelesh Ramananthan

Cloud DevOps

This is the counterpart of the Application Development track for those with an interest in the cloud.  This track will have a dual focus on planning improvements to the DevOps tools like Juju, as well as bringing DevOps up to speed with how to use them in their own cloud deployments.  Learn how to write charms, create bundles, and manage everything in a variety of public and private clouds.

Track Leads:

  • Jorge Castro
  • Marco Ceppi
  • Patricia Gaughen
  • Jose Antonio Rey


The community track has been a stable of UDS for as long as I can remember, and it’s still here in the Ubuntu Online Summit.  However, just like the other tracks, we’re looking beyond just planning ways to improve the community structure and processes.  This time we also want to have sessions showing users how they can get involved in the Ubuntu community, what teams are available, and what tools they can use in the process.

Track Leads:

  • Daniel Holbach
  • Jose Antonio Rey
  • Laura Czajkowski
  • Svetlana Belkin
  • Pablo Rubianes


This is a new track and one I’m very excited about. We are all users of Ubuntu, and whether we’ve been using it for a month or a decade, there are still things we can all learn about it. The focus of the Users track is to highlight ways to get the most out of Ubuntu, on your laptop, your phone or your server.  From detailed how-to sessions, to tips and tricks, and more, this track can provide something for everybody, regardless of skill level.

Track Leads:

  • Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph
  • Nicholas Skaggs
  • Valorie Zimmerman

So once again, it’s time to get those sessions in.  Visit this page to learn how, then start thinking of what you want to talk about during those three days.  Help the track leads out by finding more people to propose more sessions, and let’s get that schedule filled out. I look forward to seeing you all at our first ever Ubuntu Online Summit.

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Michael Hall

I’ve just finished the last day of a week long sprint for Ubuntu application development. There were many people here, designers, SDK developers, QA folks and, which excited me the most, several of the Core Apps developers from our community!

image20140520_0048I haven’t been in attendance at many conferences over the past couple of years, and without an in-person UDS I haven’t had a chance to meetup and hangout with anybody outside of my own local community. So this was a very nice treat for me personally to spend the week with such awesome and inspiring contributors.

It wasn’t a vacation though, sprints are lots of work, more work than UDS.  All of us were jumping back and forth between high information density discussions on how to implement things, and then diving into some long heads-down work to get as much implemented as we could. It was intense, and now we’re all quite tired, but we all worked together well.

I was particularly pleased to see the community guys jumping right in and thriving in what could have very easily been an overwhelming event. Not only did they all accomplish a lot of work, fix a lot of bugs, and implement some new features, but they also gave invaluable feedback to the developers of the toolkit and tools. They never cease to amaze me with their talent and commitment.

It was a little bitter-sweet though, as this was also the last sprint with Jono at the head of the community team.  As most of you know, Jono is leaving Canonical to join the XPrize foundation.  It is an exciting opportunity to be sure, but his experience and his insights will be sorely missed by the rest of us. More importantly though he is a friend to so many of us, and while we are sad to see him leave, we wish him all the best and can’t wait to hear about the things he will be doing in the future.

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Michael Hall

Bicentennial Man PosterEver since we started building the Ubuntu SDK, we’ve been trying to find ways of bringing the vast number of Android apps that exist over to Ubuntu. As with any new platform, there’s a chasm between Android apps and native apps that can only be crossed through the effort of porting.

There are simple solutions, of course, like providing an Android runtime on Ubuntu. On other platforms, those have shown to present Android apps as second-class citizens that can’t benefit from a new platform’s unique features. Worse, they don’t provide a way for apps to gradually become first-class citizens, so chasm between Android and native still exists, which means the vast majority of apps supported this way will never improve.

There are also complicates solutions, like code conversion, that try to translate Android/Java code into the native platform’s language and toolkit, preserving logic and structure along the way. But doing this right becomes such a monumental task that making a tool to do it is virtually impossible, and the amount of cleanup and checking needed to be done by an actual developer quickly rises to the same level of effort as a manual port would have. This approach also fails to take advantage of differences in the platforms, and will re-create the old way of doing things even when it doesn’t make sense on the new platform.

Screenshot from 2014-04-19 14:44:22NDR takes a different approach to these, it doesn’t let you run our Android code on Ubuntu, nor does it try to convert your Android code to native code. Instead NDR will re-create the general framework of your Android app as a native Ubuntu app, converting Activities to Pages, for example, to give you a skeleton project on which you can build your port. It won’t get you over the chasm, but it’ll show you the path to take and give you a head start on it. You will just need to fill it in with the logic code to make it behave like your Android app. NDR won’t provide any of logic for you, and chances are you’ll want to do it slightly differently than you did in Android anyway, due to the differences between the two platforms.

Screenshot from 2014-04-19 14:44:31To test NDR during development, I chose the Telegram app because it was open source, popular, and largely used Android’s layout definitions and components. NDR will be less useful against apps such as games, that use their own UI components and draw directly to a canvas, but it’s pretty good at converting apps that use Android’s components and UI builder.

After only a couple days of hacking I was able to get NDR to generate enough of an Ubuntu SDK application that, with a little bit of manual cleanup, it was recognizably similar to the Android app’s.

This proves, in my opinion, that bootstrapping an Ubuntu port based on Android source code is not only possible, but is a viable way of supporting Android app developers who want to cross that chasm and target their apps for Ubuntu as well. I hope it will open the door for high-quality, native Ubuntu app ports from the Android ecosystem.  There is still much more NDR can do to make this easier, and having people with more Android experience than me (that would be none) would certainly make it a more powerful tool, so I’m making it a public, open source project on Launchpad and am inviting anybody who has an interest in this to help me improve it.

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Ubuntu 14.04 will be released today and you couldn’t resist the itch to go try the Unity 8 preview session on the Desktop. How underwhelming… there are almost no apps, and some don’t even work and overall it’s actually pretty unexciting… let’s change that in the next few chapters. First things first though… let’s look […]

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Michael Hall

Screenshot from 2014-03-20 21:57:06Yesterday we made a big step towards developing a native email client for Ubuntu, which uses the Ubuntu UI Toolkit and will converge between between phones, tablets and the desktop from the start.

We’re not starting from scratch though, we’re building on top of the incredible work done in the Trojitá project.  Trojitá provides a fast, light email client built with Qt, which made it ideal for using with Ubuntu. And yesterday, the first of that work was accepted into upstream, you can now build an Ubuntu Components front end to Trojitá.

None of this would have been possible without the help up Trojitá’s upstream developer Jan Kundrát, who patiently helped me learn the codebase, and also the basics of CMake and Git so that I could make this first contribution. It also wouldn’t have been possible without the existing work by Ken VanDine and Joseph Mills, who both worked on the build configuration and some initial QML code that I used. Thanks also to Dan Chapman for working together with me to get this contribution into shape and accepted upstream.

This is just the start, now comes the hard work of actually building the new UI with the Ubuntu UI Toolkit.  Andrea Del Sarto has provided some fantastic UI mockups already which we can use as a start, but there’s still a need for a more detailed visual and UX design.  If you want to be part of that work, I’ve documented how to get the code and how to contribute on the EmailClient wiki.  You can also join the next IRC meeting at 1400 UTC today in #ubuntu-touch-meeting on Freenode.

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David Murphy (schwuk)

Today I was adding tox and Travis-CI support to a Django project, and I ran into a problem: our project doesn’t have a Of course I could have added one, but since by convention we don’t package our Django projects (Django applications are a different story) – instead we use virtualenv and pip requirements files – I wanted to see if I could make tox work without changing our project.

Turns out it is quite easy: just add the following three directives to your tox.ini.

In your [tox] section tell tox not to run

skipsdist = True

In your [testenv] section make tox install your requirements (see here for more details):

deps = -r{toxinidir}/dev-requirements.txt

Finally, also in your [testenv] section, tell tox how to run your tests:

commands = python test

Now you can run tox, and your tests should run!

For reference, here is a the complete (albeit minimal) tox.ini file I used:

envlist = py27
skipsdist = True

deps = -r{toxinidir}/dev-requirements.txt
setenv =
    PYTHONPATH = {toxinidir}:{toxinidir}
commands = python test

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David Murphy (schwuk)

Zach Holman writes about how GitHub communicates:

here’s a look at most of the communication that happened at GitHub on one random recent day: February 4, 2014

The expected methods are all there: chat (Campfire in their case), email, and – of course – GitHub itself.

One thing that piqued my interest was their internal-only social network “Team” which seems very reminiscent of how Automattic use WordPress & P2. Since I learned how Automattic use P2, I’ve been wondering if we could do something similar at Canonical. Perhaps we could use Google+  for this as we already use it for internal HangoutsUbuntu Developer Summit, and to power Ubuntu On-Air. There are ways to limit Google+ communities to members of your Google Apps domain.

(Side note: I hate having two Google+ accounts!)

I really need to finish coalescing my thoughts and put them into their own post…

The other point I noted was that their use of email was both minimal and individual – Team and GitHub itself are their primary ways of disseminating information.

It always interesting to see how others do achieve similar goals to yourself.

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David Murphy (schwuk)

Zach Holman writes about how GitHub communicates:

here’s a look at most of the communication that happened at GitHub on one random recent day: February 4, 2014

The expected methods are all there: chat (Campfire in their case), email, and – of course – GitHub itself.

One thing that piqued my interest was their internal-only social network “Team” which seems very reminiscent of how Automattic use WordPress & P2. Since I learned how Automattic use P2, I’ve been wondering if we could do something similar at Canonical. Perhaps we could use Google+  for this as we already use it for internal Hangouts, Ubuntu Developer Summit, and to power Ubuntu On-Air. There are ways to limit Google+ communities to members of your Google Apps domain.

(Side note: I hate having two Google+ accounts!)

I really need to finish coalescing my thoughts and put them into their own post…

The other point I noted was that their use of email was both minimal and individual – Team and GitHub itself are their primary ways of disseminating information.

It always interesting to see how others do achieve similar goals to yourself.

The post How GitHub communicates appeared first on David Murphy.

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Mir and Chromium

Ubuntu’s Display Server Mir is gaining more and more traction and the team is making good progress on the platforms that are at the core of Ubuntu. Mir is proving itself everyday to be the exact technology that Ubuntu needs to power mobile devices. Mir’s features are on par with the requirements that we put […]

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Michael Hall

Starting at 1400 UTC today, and continuing all week long, we will be hosting a series of online classes covering many aspects of Ubuntu application development. We have experts both from Canonical and our always amazing community who will be discussing the Ubuntu SDK, QML and HTML5 development, as well as the new Click packaging and app store.

You can find the full schedule here:

We’re using a new format for this year’s app developer week.  As you can tell from the link above, we’re using the Summit website.  It will work much like the virtual UDS, where each session will have a page containing an embedded YouTube video that will stream the presenter’s hangout, an embedded IRC chat window that will log you into the correct channel, and an Etherpad document where the presenter can post code examples, notes, or any other text.

Use the chatroom like you would an Ubuntu On Air session, start your questions with “QUESTION:” and wait for the presenter to get to it. After the session is over, the recorded video will be available on that page for you to replay later. If you register yourself as attending on the website (requires a Launchpad profile), you can mark yourself as attending those sessions you are interested in, and Summit can then give you a personalize schedule as well as an ical feed you can subscribe to in your calendar.

If you want to use the embedded Etherpad, make sure you’re a member of

That’s it!  Enjoy the session, ask good questions, help others when you can, and happy hacking.

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