Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'vim'

bmichaelsen

Das ist alles nur geklaut und gestohlen,
nur gezogen und geraubt.
Entschuldigung, das hab ich mir erlaubt.
— die Prinzen, Alles nur geklaut

So, you might have noticed that there was no April Fools post from me this, year unlike previous years. One idea, I had was giving LibreOffice vi-key bindings — except that apparently already exists: vibreoffice. So I went looking for something else and found odpdown by Thorsten, who just started to work on LibreOffice fulltime again, and reading about it I always had the thought that it would be great to be able to run this right from your favourite editor: Vim.

And indeed: That is not hard to do. Here is a very raw video showing how to run presentations right out of vim:

Now, this is a quick hack, Linux only, requires you to have Python3 UNO-bindings installed etc. If you want to play with it: Clone the repo from github and get started. Kudos go out to Thorsten for the original odpdown on which this is piggybagging (“das ist alles nur geklaut”). So: Have fun with this — I will have to install vibreoffice now.


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bmichaelsen

Das ist alles nur geklaut und gestohlen,
nur gezogen und geraubt.
Entschuldigung, das hab ich mir erlaubt.
— die Prinzen, Alles nur geklaut

So, you might have noticed that there was no April Fools post from me this, year unlike previous years. One idea, I had was giving LibreOffice vi-key bindings — except that apparently already exists: vibreoffice. So I went looking for something else and found odpdown by Thorsten, who just started to work on LibreOffice fulltime again, and reading about it I always had the thought that it would be great to be able to run this right from your favourite editor: Vim.

And indeed: That is not hard to do. Here is a very raw video showing how to run presentations right out of vim:

Now, this is a quick hack, Linux only, requires you to have Python3 UNO-bindings installed etc. If you want to play with it: Clone the repo from github and get started. Kudos go out to Thorsten for the original odpdown on which this is piggybagging (“das ist alles nur geklaut”). So: Have fun with this — I will have to install vibreoffice now.


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pitti

I have used LaTeX and latex-beamer for pretty much my entire life of document and presentation production, i. e. since about my 9th school grade. I’ve always found the LaTeX syntax a bit clumsy, but with good enough editor shortcuts to insert e. g. \begin{itemize} \item...\end{itemize} with just two keystrokes, it has been good enough for me.

A few months ago a friend of mine pointed out pandoc to me, which is just simply awesome. It can convert between a million document formats, but most importantly take Markdown and spit out LaTeX, or directly PDF (through an intermediate step of building a LaTeX document and calling pdftex). It also has a template for beamer. Documents now look soo much more readable and are easier to write! And you can always directly write LaTeX commands without any fuss, so that you can use markdown for the structure/headings/enumerations/etc., and LaTeX for formulax, XYTex and the other goodies. That’s how it should always should have been! ☺

So last night I finally sat down and created a vim config for it:

"-- pandoc Markdown+LaTeX -------------------------------------------

function s:MDSettings()
    inoremap <buffer> <Leader>n \note[item]{}<Esc>i
    noremap <buffer> <Leader>b :! pandoc -t beamer % -o %<.pdf<CR><CR>
    noremap <buffer> <Leader>l :! pandoc -t latex % -o %<.pdf<CR>
    noremap <buffer> <Leader>v :! evince %<.pdf 2>&1 >/dev/null &<CR><CR>

    " adjust syntax highlighting for LaTeX parts
    "   inline formulas:
    syntax region Statement oneline matchgroup=Delimiter start="\$" end="\$"
    "   environments:
    syntax region Statement matchgroup=Delimiter start="\\begin{.*}" end="\\end{.*}" contains=Statement
    "   commands:
    syntax region Statement matchgroup=Delimiter start="{" end="}" contains=Statement
endfunction

autocmd BufRead,BufNewFile *.md setfiletype markdown
autocmd FileType markdown :call <SID>MDSettings()

That gives me “good enough” (with some quirks) highlighting without trying to interpret TeX stuff as Markdown, and shortcuts for calling pandoc and evince. Improvements appreciated!

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David Murphy (schwuk)

Although I still use my desktop replacement (i.e., little-to-no battery life) for a good chunk of my work, recent additions to my setup have resulted in some improvements that I thought others might be interested in.

For Christmas just gone my wonderful wife Suzanne – and my equally wonderful children, but let’s face it was her money not theirs! – bought me a HP Chromebook 14. Since the Chromebooks were first announced, I was dismissive of them, thinking that at best they would be a cheap laptop to install Ubuntu on. However over the last year my attitudes had changed, and I came to realise that at least 70% of my time is spent in some browser or other, and of the other 30% most is spent in a terminal or Sublime Text. This realisation, combined with the improvements Intel Haswell brought to battery life made me reconsider my position and start seriously looking at a Chromebook as a 2nd machine for the couch/coffee shop/travel.

I initially focussed on the HP Chromebook 11 and while the ARM architecture didn’t put me off, the 2GB RAM did. When I found the Chromebook 14 with a larger screen, 4GB RAM and Haswell chipset, I dropped enough subtle hints and Suzanne got the message. :-)

So Christmas Day came and I finally got my hands on it! First impressions were very favourable: this neither looks nor feels like a £249 device. ChromeOS was exactly what I was expecting, and generally gets out of my way. The keyboard is superb, and I would compare it in quality to that of my late MacBook Pro. Battery life is equally superb, and I’m easily getting 8+ hours at a time.

Chrome – and ChromeOS – is not without limitations though, and although a new breed of in-browser environments such as Codebox, Koding, Nitrous.io, and Cloud9 are giving more options for developers, what I really want is a terminal. Enter Secure Shell from Google – SSH in your browser (with public key authentication). This lets me connect to any box of my choosing, and although I could have just connected back to my desk-bound laptop, I would still be limited to my barely-deserves-the-name-broadband ADSL connection.

So, with my Chromebook and SSH client in place, DigitalOcean was my next port of call, using their painless web interface to create an Ubuntu-based droplet. Command Line Interfaces are incredibly powerful, and despite claims to the contrary most developers spending most of their time with them1. There are a plethora of tools to improve your productivity, and my three must-haves are:

With this droplet I can do pretty much anything I need that ChromeOS doesn’t provide, and connect through to the many other droplets, linodes, EC2 nodes, OpenStack nodes and other servers I use personally and professionally.

In some other posts I’ll expand on how I use (and – equally importantly – how I secure) my DigitalOcean droplets, and which “apps” I use with Chrome.


  1. The fact that I now spend most of my time in the browser and not on the command-line shows you that I’ve settled into my role as an engineering manager! :-) 

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