Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'unix'

Colin Ian King

Earlier this week I stumbled upon the unix-jun72 project which is a restoration of the 1st edition of UNIX based on a scanned printout of the original source.  Unfortunately not all the source is available, but some userland binaries and the C compiler have been recovered from some tapes and there is enough functionality to be able to boot to a minimal and usable system.

The first step is to download and build the most excellent Simh simulator so that we can simulate a PDP-11.   Fortunately the disk images are already pre-built and downloadable, so one just has to download these and point the PDP-11 simulator at a config file and the system almost instantly boots.  The full instructions are provided in great detail here.

I am rather fond of the PDP-11. It was the first mini computer I worked on back in 1987 when I was a very junior programmer at Prosig.  The machine was running RSX-11M Plus rather than UNIX but even so it gave me the appreciation of what one can do on a very small multi-user machine. At the time I was maintaining, building and testing DATS signal processing tools written in Fortran 77, and some of the work involved tinkering with task builder scripts to try and cram code into the very limited memory.

So in those days size really mattered.  Small was considered beautiful and this mindset was instilled into me in my formative years.  So I was very pleased to find the unix-jun72 project which allows me to relive those PDP-11 days and also experience UNIX-1.

Since some of the original source code still exists, one can browse the source of the kernel and some of the core utilities.  It is amazing to see the functionality that is available in very small binaries.

Let's  fire up the simulator and see the size of the 'cat' command:

 PDP-11 simulator V3.9-0  
Disabling CR
Disabling XQ
RF: buffering file in memory
TC0: 16b format, buffering file in memory
:login: root
root
# ls -al /bin/cat
total 1
50 sxrwr- 1 bin 134 Jan 1 00:00:00 cat

 And how does that compare to a GNU cat on a 64 bit Ubuntu laptop?

 ls -al /bin/cat  
-rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 47912 Nov 28 12:48 /bin/cat

134 bytes versus 47912 bytes. That is quite a difference!  Admittedly we are comparing apples vs pears here, so obviously this is an unfair comparison, but it does illustrate how we've "progressed" since the early UNIX-1 days.   Honestly I'm glad we can now write userland tools and the kernel in C rather than assembler and not have to worry about size constraints quite so much.

I'm very glad that this project exists to preserve the UNIX heritage.  History has a lot to teach us.  Browsing the early code is an education; it allows us to appreciate the memory constraints that shaped the design and implementation of UNIX.  To be able to run this code in a simulator and tinker with a running system adds to the experience.

We've moved on a long way in 40 or so years, machines are incredibly powerful, and memory and disk is cheap.  But let us not forget the "small is beautiful" ideal.  There is something very appealing about tools that do just enough to be very useful and yet are not bloated with unnecessary memory hogging feature creep.

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Dustin Kirkland

I learned earlier this morning that Dennis Ritchie, one of the fathers of the C programming and UNIX as we know it, passed away.  Thank you so much, Mr. Ritchie, for the immeasurable contributions you've made to the modern world of computing!  I think I'm gainfully employed and love computer technology in the way I do, and am in no small ways indebted to your innovation and open contributions to that world.

Sadly, I've never met "dmr", but I did have a very small conversation with him, via a mutual friend -- Jon "maddog" Hall (who wrote his own farewell in this heartfelt article).

A couple of years ago, I created the update-motd utility for Ubuntu systems, whereby the "message of the day", traditionally located at /etc/motd could be dynamically generated, rather than a static message composed by the system's administrator.  The initial driver for this was Canonical's Landscape project, but numerous others have found it useful, especially in Cloud environments.

A while back, a colleague of mine complemented the sheer simplicity of the idea of placing executable scripts in /etc/update-motd.d/ and collating the results at login into /etc/motd.  He asked if any Linux or UNIX distribution had ever provided a simple framework for dynamically generating the MOTD.  I've only been around Linux/UNIX for ~15 years, so I really had no idea.  This would take a bit of old school research into the origins of the MOTD!

I easily traced it back through every FHS release, back to the old fsstnd-1.0.  The earliest reference I could find in print that specifically referred to the path /etc/motd was Using the Unix System by Richard L. Gauthier (1981).

At this point, I reached out to colleagues Rusty Russell and Jon "maddog" Hall, and asked if they could help me a bit more with my search.  Rusty said that I would specifically need someone with a beard, and CC'd "maddog" (who I had also emailed :-)

Maddog did a bit of digging himself...if by "digging" you mean emailing the author of C and Unix!  I had a smile from ear to ear when this message appeared in my inbox:

Jon 'maddog' Hall to Dustin on Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 10:08 PM: 

> A young friend of mine is investigating the origins of /etc/motd.  I
> think he is working on a mechanism to easily update that file.
>
> I think I can remember it in AT&T Unix of 1977, when I joined the labs,
> but we do not know how long it was in Unix before that, and if it was
> inspired by some other system.
>
> Can you help us out with this piece of trivia?


Ah, a softball!
MOTD is quite old.  The same thing was in CTSS and then
Multics, and doubtless in other systems.  I suspect
even the name is pretty old.  It came into Unix early on.


I haven't looked for the best  citation, but I bet it's easily
findable:  one of the startling things that happened
on CTSS was that someone was editing the password
file (at that time with no encryption) and managed
to save the password file as the MOTD.


Hope you're well,
 Regards,
 Dennis
Well sure enough, Dennis was (of course) right.  The "message of the day" does actually predate UNIX itself!  I would eventually find Time-sharing Computer Systems, by Maurice Wilkes (1968), which says:

"There is usually also a message of the day, a feature designed to keep users in touch with new facilities introduced and with other changes in the system"


As well as the Second National Symposium on Engineering Information, New York, October 27, 1965 proceedings:
"When a user sits down at his desk (console), he finds a "message of the day".  It is tailored to his specific interests, which are of course known by the system."

Brilliant!  So it wasn't so much that update-motd had introduced something that no one had ever thought of, but rather that it had re-introduced an old idea that had long since been forgotten in the annals of UNIX history.

I must express a belated "thank you" to Dennis (and maddog), for the nudges in the right direction.  Thank you for so many years of C and UNIX innovation.  Few complex technologies have stood the test of time as well as C, UNIX and the internal combustion engine.

RIP, Dennis.

-Dustin

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