Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'ubuntu'

Nicholas Skaggs

Continuing our discussion of the testing within ubuntu, today's post will talk about how you can help ubuntu stay healthy by manually testing the images produced. No amount of robots or automated testing in the world can replace you (well, at least not yet, heh), and more specifically your workflow and usage patterns.

As discussed, everyday new images are produced for ubuntu for all supported architecture types. I would encourage you to follow along and watch the progression of the OS through these images and your testing. Every data point matters and testing on a regular basis is helpful. So how to get started?

Settle in with a nice cup of tea while testing!

The Desktop
For the desktop images everything you need is on the image tracker. There is a wonderful video and text tutorial for helping you get started. You report your results on the tracker itself in a simple web form, so you'll need a launchpad account if you don't have one.

The secondary way to help keep the desktop images in good shape is to install and run the development version of ubuntu on your machine. Each day you can check for updates and update your machine to stay in sync. Use your pc as you normally would, and when you find a bug, report it! Bugs found before the release are much easier to fix than after release.

Phablet
Now for the phablet images you will need a device capable of running the image. Check out the list. Grab your device and go through the installation process as described on the wiki. Make sure to select the '-proposed' channel when you install so you will see updates to get the latest images being worked on every time they are built. From there you can update everyday. Use the device and when you find a bug, report it! Here's a wiki page to help guide your testing and help you understand how and where to report bugs.

Don't forget there's a whole team of people within ubuntu dedicated to testing just like you. And they would love to have you join them!

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Iain Farrell

Happy by Sergei Pozdnyak

The submissions process for Ubuntu 14.04 is now closed. If you’d like to look at the images head over to the Flickr Group. From here on a group of dedicated and splendid individuals will get together to select the images that are going to go into the next release of Ubuntu. We’ll be hanging out on #1404wallpaper on Freenode and you can come listen in :)

We generally welcome discussion but please remember that a decision is needed from the time that people volunteer so not too much additional debate.

We’ll start with a meeting tomorrow, Friday 7th March, at 19:00GMT.


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olli

Mir and Chromium

Ubuntu’s Display Server Mir is gaining more and more traction and the team is making good progress on the platforms that are at the core of Ubuntu. Mir is proving itself everyday to be the exact technology that Ubuntu needs to power mobile devices. Mir’s features are on par with the requirements that we put […]

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Nicholas Skaggs

Since just before the last LTS, quality has been a buzzword within the ubuntu community. We've come a long way since precise and I wanted to provide some help and prospective on what ubuntu's process for quality looks like this cycle. In simple terms. Or as reddit would say, "explain to me like I'm 5".

I'll try and define terms as we go. First let me define CI, which is perhaps the buzzword of this cycle, lest I lose all of you! CI stands for continuous integration, and it means we are testing ubuntu. All the time. Non-stop. Every change we make, we test. The goal behind this idea is to find and fix problems, before well, they become problems on your device!

CI Dashboard
The CI dashboard then is a way to visually see the results of this testing. It acts as a representation of the health of ubuntu as a distribution. At least once a day runs are executed, apps and images are tested and benchmarked, and the results are populated on ci.ubuntu.com. This is perhaps the most visible part of the CI (our continuous testing efforts) that is happening within ubuntu. But let's step back a minute and look at how the overall CI process works within ubuntu.

CI Process
App developers hack on a bit of code, fixing bugs or adding new features to the codebase. Once the code is ready, a merge proposal1 is created by the developer and feedback is sought. If the code passes the peer review and the application's tests, it will then become part of the image after a journey through the CI train.


For the community core apps, the code is merged after peer review, and then undergoes a similar journey to the store where it will become part of the image as well. Provided of course it meets further review criteria by myself and Alan (we'll just call him the gatekeeper).
Though menacing, Alan assures me he doesn't bite

Lest we forget, upstream2 uploads3 are done as well. We can hope some form of testing was done on them before we received them. Nevertheless, tests are run on these as well, and if they pass successfully, the new packages will enter the archive4 and become part of the image.

Generating Images
Now it's time to generate some images. For the desktop a snapshot of what's in the ubuntu archive is taken each day, built, and then subjected to a series of installation tests. If the tests pass, it is released for general testing called Image (or ISO) testing. An image is tested and declared stable as part of a milestone (or testing event) and can become the next version of ubuntu!
Adopted images are healthy images!

On the ubuntu phone side of things, all the new uploads are gathered and evaluated for risk. If something is a large change, it might be prudent to not land it with other large changes so we can tell what broke should the image not work properly. Once everything is ready, a new image is created and is released for testing.  The OTA updates (over-the-air; system updates) on your ubuntu phone come from this process!

How you can help?
Still with me I hope? As you can see there's many things happening each day in regards to quality and lots of places where you can create a positive change for the health of the distro! In my next few posts, I'll cover each of the places you can plug in to help ubuntu be healthy everyday!

1. A merge proposal is a means of changing an applications code via peer review.
2. By upstream, I mean the communities and people who make things we use inside of ubuntu, but are not directly a part of it. Something like the browser (firefox) and kernel are good examples.
3. This can happen via a general sync at the beginning of the cycle from debian. This sync copies part of the debian archive into the ubuntu archive, which in effect causes applications to be updated. Applications are also updated whenever a core ubuntu developer or a MOTU uploads a new version to the archive. 
4. In case you are wondering, "the archive" is the big repository where all of your updates and new applications come from!

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Michael Hall

Starting at 1400 UTC today, and continuing all week long, we will be hosting a series of online classes covering many aspects of Ubuntu application development. We have experts both from Canonical and our always amazing community who will be discussing the Ubuntu SDK, QML and HTML5 development, as well as the new Click packaging and app store.

You can find the full schedule here: http://summit.ubuntu.com/appdevweek-1403/

We’re using a new format for this year’s app developer week.  As you can tell from the link above, we’re using the Summit website.  It will work much like the virtual UDS, where each session will have a page containing an embedded YouTube video that will stream the presenter’s hangout, an embedded IRC chat window that will log you into the correct channel, and an Etherpad document where the presenter can post code examples, notes, or any other text.

Use the chatroom like you would an Ubuntu On Air session, start your questions with “QUESTION:” and wait for the presenter to get to it. After the session is over, the recorded video will be available on that page for you to replay later. If you register yourself as attending on the website (requires a Launchpad profile), you can mark yourself as attending those sessions you are interested in, and Summit can then give you a personalize schedule as well as an ical feed you can subscribe to in your calendar.

If you want to use the embedded Etherpad, make sure you’re a member of https://launchpad.net/~ubuntu-etherpad

That’s it!  Enjoy the session, ask good questions, help others when you can, and happy hacking.

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Jono Bacon

So, we have announced the Ubuntu App Showdown where you can build some awesome Ubuntu apps and win prizes such as the Nexus 7 (2013) tablet and the Meizu MX3, we have provided an update on lots of great updates going on such as refined HTML5 support and a raft of developer.ubuntu.com updates, we have revised and improved how the dash and scopes work (more developer docs on this coming soon!), we have simplified how apps are uploaded to the store, and of course, Ubuntu handsets are hitting the market later this year so our app devs will have plenty of new users to consume their apps. But, why stop there?

We are not here to build a good app developer community, we are here to build the most empowering, rewarding, and fun app developer community there is, all powered by openness and collaboration.

As such, I am delighted to announce that next week Ubuntu App Developer Week beginning on Monday 3rd March at 2pm UTC and running all week

This is a week with a range of tutorial sessions for how to build apps for Ubuntu across QML, HTML5 and more. All of these sessions take place online in a series of Google Hangouts, complete with embedded chat channels where you can interact with the speaker and ask questions.

This includes sessions such as the following for QML apps:

  • Game Development with QML and Box2D
  • Internationalize your apps
  • Extending QML with a C++ Plugin
  • Ubuntu UI Toolkit tips and tricks for beginners
  • Responsive Layouts
  • Testing with qmltestrunner
  • Making the perfect user acceptance test
  • Integrating U1DB in your app
  • Content Exchange in a confined world
  • Add download capabilities to your apps

and the following for HTML5 apps:

  • Building HTML5 apps with Ubuntu
  • Cordova in HTML5 Apps
  • Platform APIs for HTML5 Apps
  • HTML5 UbuntuUI Components
  • Debugging HTML5 apps

We also have a few other sessions such as a feedback session on the software store and how to get compiled code into click packages.

How Do I Join?

Ubuntu App Developer Week is available freely to anyone who chooses to join. You don’t have to be an expert, and you don’t have to know how to write apps with the Ubuntu SDK yet. Beginners are very welcome!

All of the sessions, their times, and how to join them are available on the Ubuntu App Developer Week schedule. Just show up at the right time, click a session, and you are ready to go!

We still have some slots free if you want to volunteer to run a session. If you would like to, please email Michael Hall.

The fun starts next week on Monday 3rd March at 2pm UTC and runs all week. We hope to see you there!

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Michael Hall

Today we announced the start of the next Ubuntu App Showdown, and I have very high hopes for the kinds of apps we’ll see this time around. Our SDK has grown by leaps and bounds since the last one, and so much more is possible now. So go get yourself started now: http://developer.ubuntu.com/apps/

Earlier today Jono posted his Top 5 Dream Ubuntu Apps, and they all sound great.  I don’t have any specific apps I’d like to see, but I would love to get some multi-player games.  Nothing fancy, nothing 3D or FPS.  Think more like Draw Something or Words With Friends, something casual, turn-based, that lets me connect with other Ubuntu device users. A clone of one of those would be fun, but let’s try and come up with something original, something unique to Ubuntu.

What do you say, got any good ideas?  If you do, post them in the App Showdown subreddit or our Google+ App Developers community and let’s make it happen.

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Michael Hall

It’s been a crazy busy week, and it’s only Tuesday (as of this writing)!  Because I’m exhausted, this is going to be a short post listing the things that are new.

New Roof

I wrote earlierthat I was having a new roof put on my house.  Well that all starter unceremoniously at 7:30am on Monday, and the hammering over my head has been going on non-stop for two full working days.  Everybody who joined me on a Google+ Hangout has been regaled with the sounds of my torment.  It looks nice though, so there’s that.

New Developer Portal

Well, new-ish.  We heavily revamped the Apps section to include more walk-through content to help new Ubuntu app developers learn the tools, the process and the platform.  If you haven’t been there yet, you really should give it a read and get yourself started: http://developer.ubuntu.com/apps/

New HTML5 APIs

In addition to the developer portal itself, I was able to publish new HTML5 API docs for the 14.04 release of Ubuntu.  Not only does this include the UbuntuUI library from the previous release, it also introduced new platform APIs for Content Hub, Online Accounts and Alarms, with more platform APIs coming soon.  The Cordova 3.4 API docs are proving harder to parse and upload than I anticipated, but I will hopefully have them published soon. If you’re an HTML5 app developer, you’ll be interested in these: http://developer.ubuntu.com/api/html5/sdk-14.04/

New Scopes

While not exactly a secret, we did start to make some noise about the new Scopes framework and Unity Dash that bring in a lot of improvements. As much as I liked the Home lens searching everything and aggregating results, it just wasn’t reaching the potential we had hoped for it.  The new setup will allow scopes to add more information that is specific to their result types, control how those results are displayed, and more clearly brand themselves to let the user know what’s being searched. You can read more about the enhancements at http://developer.ubuntu.com/2014/02/introducing-our-new-scopes-technology/ Like I said, it’s been a crazy busy week.  And we’re not done yet!

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Michael Hall

There’s been a lot of talk about Ubuntu’s phone and tablet development over the last year, and it’s great that it’s getting so much attention, but people have been getting the name of it all wrong. Now, to be fair, this is a problem entirely of our own making, we started off talking about the phone (and later tablet) developments as “Ubuntu Touch”, and put most of the information about on our wiki under a page named Touch.  But there is no Ubuntu Touch! It’s not a separate OS or platform, there is only one OS and it’s simply called Ubuntu.

Ubuntu 14.04 Stack

What people are referring to when they say Touch or Ubuntu Touch, is really just Ubuntu with Unity 8.  Other than the shell (and display server that powers it), it’s the same OS as you get on your desktop.

Everything under the hood is the same: same tools, same filesystem, even the same version of them, because it’s all built from the same source. Calendar data is stored in the same place, audio and video is played through the same system, even the Unity APIs are shared between desktop and phone.

So why is the name important?  Not only is it more accurate to call them both Ubuntu, it’s also one of the (in my opinion) most exciting things about having an Ubuntu phone.  You’re not getting a stripped down embedded Linux OS, or something so customized for phones that it’s useless on your desktop.  You’re getting a fully featured, universal operating system, one that can do everything you need from a phone and everything you need from a desktop.

Future Ubuntu Stack

This is the key to Ubuntu’s convergence strategy, something that nobody else has right now. Android makes a terrible desktop OS.  So does iOS.  Chrome OS won’t work for a phone either, nor OSX. Even Microsoft has built two different platforms for mobile and desktop, even if they’ve slapped the same interface on both.

But with Ubuntu, once Unity 8 comes to the desktop, you will have the same OS, the same platform, on all of your devices. And while you will run the same version of Unity on both, Unity 8 is smart enough to change how it looks and how it works to meet the needs and capabilities of what you’re running it on.  Better still, Unity will be able to make these changes at run time, so if you dock your convertible tablet to a keyboard, it will automatically switch from giving you a tablet interface to a desktop interface. All of your running apps keep running, but thanks to the Ubuntu SDK those too will automatically adjust to work as desktop apps.

So while “Ubuntu Touch” may have been a useful distinction in the beginning, it isn’t anymore.  Instead, if you need to differentiate between desktop and mobile versions of Ubuntu, you should refer to “Unity 8″ if talking about the interface, or “Ubuntu for phones” (or tablet) if you’re talking about device images or hardware enablement. And if you’re a developer and you are talking about the platform APIs or capabilities, you’re talking about the “Ubuntu SDK”, which is already available on both desktop and mobile installs of Ubuntu.

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Michael Hall

Ubuntu API Website

For much of the past year I’ve been working on the Ubuntu API Website, a Django project for hosting all of the API documentation for the Ubuntu SDK, covering a variety of languages, toolkits and libraries.  It’s been a lot of work for just one person, to make it really awesome I’m going to need help from you guys and gals in the community.

To help smooth the onramp to getting started, here is a breakdown of the different components in the site and how they all fit together.  You should grab a copy of the branch from Launchpad so you can follow along by running: bzr branch lp:ubuntu-api-website

Django

First off, let’s talk about the framework.  The API website uses Django, a very popular Python webapp framework that’s also used by other community-run Ubuntu websites, such as Summit and the LoCo Team Portal, which makes it a good fit. A Django project consists of one or more Django “apps”, which I will cover below.  Each app consists of “models”, which use the Django ORM (Object-Relational Mapping) to handle all of the database interactions for us, so we can stick to just Python and not worry about SQL.  Apps also have “views”, which are classes or functions that are called when a URL is requested.  Finally, Django provides a default templating engine that views can use to produce HTML.

If you’re not familiar with Django already, you should take the online Tutorial.  It only takes about an hour to go through it all, and by the end you’ll have learned all of the fundamental things about building a Django site.

Branch Root

When you first get the branch you’ll see one folder and a handful of files.  The folder, developer_network, is the Django project root, inside there is all of the source code for the website.  Most of your time is going to be spent in there.

Also in the branch root you’ll find some files that are used for managing the project itself. Most important of these is the README file, which gives step by step instructions for getting it running on your machine. You will want to follow these instructions before you start changing code. Among the instructions is using the requirements.txt file, also in the branch root, to setup a virtualenv environment.  Virtualenv lets you create a Python runtime specifically for this project, without it conflicting with your system-wide Python installation.

The other files you can ignore for now, they’re used for packaging and deploying the site, you won’t need them during development.

./developer_network/

As I mentioned above, this folder is the Django project root.  It has sub-folders for each of the Django apps used by this project. I will go into more detail on each of these apps below.

This folder also contains three important files for Django: manage.py, urls.py and settings.py

manage.py is used for a number of commands you can give to Django.  In the README you’ll have seen it used to call syncdbmigrate and initdb.  These create the database tables, apply any table schema changes, and load them with initial data. These commands only need to be run once.  It also has you run collectstatic and runserver. The first collects static files (images, css, javascript, etc) from all of the apps and puts them all into a single ./static/ folder in the project root, you’ll need to run that whenever you change one of those files in an app.  The second, runserver, runs a local HTTP server for your app, this is very handy during development when you don’t want to be bothered with a full Apache server. You can run this anytime you want to see your site “live”.

settings.py contains all of the Django configuration for the project.  There’s too much to go into detail on here, and you’ll rarely need to touch it anyway.

urls.py is the file that maps URLs to an application’s views, it’s basically a list of regular-expressions that try to match the requested URL, and a python function or class to call for that match. If you took the Django project tutorial I recommended above, you should have a pretty good understanding of what it does. If you ever add a new view, you’ll need to add a corresponding line to this file in order for Django to know about it. If you want to know what view handles a given URL, you can just look it up here.

./developer_network/ubuntu_website/

If you followed the README in the branch root, the first thing it has you do is grab another bzr branch and put it in ./developer_network/ubuntu_website.  This is a Django app that does nothing more than provide a base template for all of your project’s pages. It’s generic enough to be used by other Django-powered websites, so it’s kept in a separate branch that each one can pull from.  It’s rare that you’ll need to make changes in here, but if you do just remember that you need to push you changes branch to the ubuntu-community-webthemes project on Launchpad.

./developer_network/rest_framework/

This is a 3rd party Django app that provides the RESTful JSON API for the site. You should not make changes to this app, since that would put us out of sync with the upstream code, and would make it difficult to pull in updates from them in the future.  All of the code specific to the Ubuntu API Website’s services are in the developer_network/service/ app.

./developer_network/search/

This app isn’t being used yet, but it is intended for giving better search functionality to the site. There are some models here already, but nothing that is being used.  So if searching is your thing, this is the app you’ll want to work in.

./developer_network/related/

This is another app that isn’t being used yet, but is intended to allow users to link additional content to the API documentation. This is one of the major goals of the site, and a relatively easy area to get started contributing. There are already models defined for code snippets, Images and links. Snippets and Links should be relatively straightforward to implement. Images will be a little harder, because the site runs on multiple instances in the cloud, and each instance will need access to the image, so we can’t just use the Django default of saving them to local files. This is the best place for you to make an impact on the site.

./developer_network/common/

The common app provides views for logging in and out of the app, as well as views for handling 404 and 500 errors when the arise.  It also provides some base models the site’s page hierarchy. This starts with a Topic at the top, which would be qml or html5 in our site, followed by a Version which lets us host different sets of docs for the different supported releases of Ubuntu. Finally each set of docs is placed within a Section, such as Graphical Interface or Platform Service to help the user browse them based on use.

./developer_network/apidocs/

This app provides models that correspond directly to pieces of documentation that are being imported.  Documentation can be imported either as an Element that represents a specific part of the API, such as a class or function, or as a Page that represents long-form text on how to use the Elements themselves.  Each one of these may also have a given Namespace attached to it, if the imported language supports it, to further categorize them.

./developer_network/web/

Finally we get into the app that is actually generates the pages.  This app has no models, but uses the ones defined in the common and apidocs apps.  This app defines all of the views and templates used by the website’s pages, so no matter what you are working on there’s a good chance you’ll need to make changes in here too. The templates defined here use the ones in ubuntu_website as a base, and then add site and page specific markup for each.

Getting Started

If you’re still reading this far down, congratulations! You have all the information you need to dive in and start turning a boring but functional website into a dynamic, collaborative information hub for Ubuntu app developers. But you don’t need to go it alone, I’m on IRC all the time, so come find me (mhall119) in #ubuntu-website or #ubuntu-app-devel on Freenode and let me know where you want to start. If you don’t do IRC, leave a comment below and I’ll respond to it. And of course you can find the project, file bugs (or pick bugs to fix) and get the code all from the Launchpad project.

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Michael Hall

It may surprise some of you (not really) to learn that in addition to being a software geek, I’m also a sci-fi nerd. One of my current guilty pleasures is the British Sci-Fi hit Doctor Who. I’m not alone in this, I know many of you reading this are fans of the show too.  Many of my friends from outside the floss-o-sphere are, and some of them record a weekly podcast on the subject.

Tonight one of them was over at my house for dinner, and I was reminded of Stuart Langridge’s post about making a Bad Voltage app and how he had a GenericPodcastApp component that provided common functionality with a clean separation from the rest of his app. So I decided to see how easy it would be to make a DWO Whocast app with it.  Turns out, it was incredibly easy.

Here are the steps I took:

  1. Create a new project in QtCreator
  2. Download Stuart’s GenericPodcastApp.qml into my project’s ./components/ folder
  3. Replace the template’s Page components with GenericPodcastApp
  4. Customize the necessary fields
  5. Add a nice icon and Suru-style gradients for good measure

That’s it! All told it took my less than 10 minutes to put the app together, test it, show it off, and submit my Click package to the store.  And the app doesn’t look half bad either.  Think about that, 10 minutes to get from an idea to the store.  It would have been available to download too if automatic reviews were working in the store (coming soon).

That’s the power of the Ubuntu SDK. What can you do with it in 10 minutes?

Update: Before this was even published this morning the app was reviewed, approved, and available in the store.  You can download it now on your Ubuntu phone or tablet.

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Nicholas Skaggs

Recently the ubuntu core app developers and myself have been on an adventure towards adopting cmake for the all the core applications. While some of the applications are pure qml it's still been useful to embark on adopting a singular build system for all of the projects. Now that (most) of the pain of transitioning is gone, I'm going to talk about one of the useful features of setting up cmake for your project; click-buddy!

Click-buddy is an evolving tool that helps you build and deploy click packages to your phablet device. In addition, it has the ability to setup the device to run your autopilot test suite. So, rather than writing anything further, let's cover an example. You are going to need phablet-tools installed for this to work. I'm going to branch the clock app, build the click package, install it on my device, and finally run the tests.

bzr branch lp:ubuntu-clock-app
cd ubuntu-clock-app
click-buddy --dir . --provision
phablet-test-run -v ubuntu_clock_app

Click-buddy is also gaining the ability to build your project, even it involves a plugin and you are interested in building for your phablet device (armhf). Once landed you will be able to run something like this for non-qml applications.

sudo click chroot -a armhf create
click-buddy --arch armhf --provision

This will setup a chroot automagically for you and compile and build your application. Give it a try!

Note, as of this writing, emulator support for the ubuntu-ui-toolkit emulator is not yet built in. If your tests fail with a module import, run this line from your connected pc. It will copy over the ubuntu-ui-toolkit emulator (provided you have it installed on your pc :-) ) and your tests should now properly run.

adb push /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/ubuntuuitoolkit /home/phablet/autopilot/ubuntuuitoolkit

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Michael Hall

Yesterday, in a conference call with the press followed immediately by a public Town Hall with the community, Canonical announced the first two hardware manufacturers who are going to ship Ubuntu on smartphones!

Now many have speculated on why we think we can succeed where so many giants have failed.  It’s a question we see quite a bit, actually.  If Microsoft, RIM/Blackberry and HP all failed, what makes us think we can succeed?  It’s simple math, really.  We’re small.  Yeah, that’s it, we’re just small.

Unlike those giants who tried and failed, we don’t need to dominate the market to be successful. Even just 1% of the market would be enough to sustain and continue the development of Ubuntu for phones, and probably help cover the cost of developing it for desktops too.  The server side is already paying for itself.  Because we’re small and diversified, we don’t need to win big in order to win at all.  And 1%, that’s a very reachable target.

 

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Canonical

 

  • bq and Meizu sign agreements to deliver and ship Ubuntu phones

  • Online campaigns with bq and Meizu will make Ubuntu phones available globally

  • Strong support for Ubuntu devices has also been received from carriers worldwide

19th February 2014, London: Canonical today announces it has signed agreements with mobile device manufacturers bq (www.bq.com) (Spain) and Meizu (China) to bring Ubuntu smartphones to consumers globally. Canonical is working with these partners to ship the first Ubuntu devices on the latest hardware in 2014. Ubuntu has also received significant support from the world’s biggest carriers, some of which intend to work with OEM partners to bring phones to market this year.

Development programmes have begun with the partners to provide smartphones with a superior user experience on mid to high end hardware for consumers around the world. Devices will be available to buy online through bq, Meizu and at Ubuntu.com.

Ubuntu introduces a new UI paradigm for mobile devices. Ubuntu puts content and services at the centre of the experience, rather than hiding them behind stores and apps. This gives consumers a fresh and rich way to engage with their favourite videos, music and other mobile activities. It also means OEMs and operators have unprecedented customisation opportunities with a common UI toolkit, which gives devices their own unique footprint and without fragmenting the platform.

Meizu is one of China’s most successful high-end smartphone manufacturers with over 1,000 employees, 600 retail stores and a global presence in China, Hong Kong, Israel, Russia and Ukraine. In January, the company announced its strategy to expand into other international markets as well as to ship phones in America later in 2014 and Ubuntu will be a key part of this expansion. Meizu designs and retails phones that are characterised by light, comfortable design as well as ease of use and functionality. “Ubuntu’s intuitive and visually stunning user interface aligns with our own ethos of producing simple, innovative mobile experiences. This partnership gives us an opportunity to develop a truly different and compelling offering that will support our strategy to deliver devices to both China as well as internationally,” says  Li Nan, Meizu’s VP Sales and Marketing.

bq is a manufacturer of multimedia devices operating in Europe and employing 600 people. In 2013, the company shipped almost 1.5 million devices and in less than a year has become the Spain’s second biggest seller of unlocked smartphones. bq will bring Ubuntu onto its latest hardware specifications. “Ubuntu’s ongoing success on PCs, as well as the huge support it has gained for its mobile proposition provides the best opportunity to bring an alternative platform to market on our hardware,” Alberto Mendez, CEO, comments.

Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu, adds; “The mobile industry has long been looking for a viable alternative to those that reign today. Ubuntu puts the control back into the hands of our partners and presents an exciting platform for consumers, delivering an experience which departs from the tired app icon grid of Android and iOS and provides a fluid, content-rich experience for all.”

Carriers and major industry players that Canonical has engaged with have also shown their support for Ubuntu and an alternative operating system for the mobile market. To date, Ubuntu’s Carrier Advisory Group has 16 members including Vodafone, EE, T-Mobile USA, Three Group, Deutsche Telekom, Verizon, Telstra and Portugal Telecom. Canonical is also working with a breadth of ISV partners, including The Weather Channel, GrooveShark, Evernote and more, to bring the best applications and services to Ubuntu.

Portugal Telecom: “It is our commitment to keep working closely with Canonical to build a proposition for Ubuntu devices  that will deliver a fresh, new and exciting experience for our users,” says Pedro Leitão, Member of the Board of Portugal Telecom, responsible for the Consumer Segment.

Three Group: “Ubuntu is creating an innovative mobile web experience that brings more choice for customers, and opportunities for operators and OEMs who are keen to differentiate their devices.”

Telecom Italia: “We’ve been very active in helping shape Ubuntu for the Italian market by contributing to the Ubuntu Carrier Advisory Group for many months.”

Smart: “Ubuntu’s entry to the mobile phone market is definitely exciting. We see this as an interesting opportunity to help bring mobile innovations quicker to the market, lower access barriers and provide more choices in terms of apps and devices,” says Orlando B.Vea, chief wireless advisor at Smart. “We’re very keen to work with Ubuntu and the developer community in making this happen as it supports our goal to bring the mobile Internet to every Filipino.”

Smartfren (Indonesia): “We’ve been working closely with Canonical and the Carrier Advisory Group for several months, and look forward to being able to launch Ubuntu devices in the Indonesian market,” comments Richard Tan, deputy CEO.

Ends

About Canonical
Canonical is the company behind Ubuntu and the leading provider of services for Ubuntu deployments in the enterprise. With global teams of developers, support staff and engineering centres, Canonical is uniquely positioned to help partners and customers make the most of Ubuntu. Canonical is a privately held company.

Ubuntu is a free, open-source platform for client, server and cloud computing. It is the most widely used Linux on the top 1000 websites by traffic, the reference platform for OpenStack deployments, the most popular guest OS on public clouds, and ships on PCs from Dell, Lenovo, HP and other brands. Since its launch in 2004, it has become the preferred choice for open desktop and scale-out computing, from Fortune 500 companies to hardware makers, content providers, software developers and consumers.

About bq
bq is a company dedicated to consumer electronics, which designs and develops both software and hardware. Its main division is multimedia devices (e-readers, tablets and smartphones), a market in which it is the leader in Spain. Its innovative spirit had led it to operate in emerging fields such as educational robotics, the development of reading platforms and 3D printing. In this latter market, it designs and manufactures its own 3D printer, the bq Witbox, which is distributed worldwide. www.bq.com.

About Meizu
Established in 2003 and headquartered in Zhuhai, China, MEIZU designs and produces smartphones created to provide a simple, intuitive mobile experience for people whose time is expected to be simply spent in using their devices, instead of figuring out the way of using them.

MEIZU expanded into the smartphone market in 2008 and has been committed to developing high-end smartphones ever since. Based on a business philosophy and commitment to pursuing perfection and long-term development, MEIZU remains laser focused on developing innovative and user-friendly smartphones for consumers. With more than 1,000 employees and 600 retail stores, the company has built a global presence in Hong Kong, Israel, Russia and Ukraine. www.meizu.com

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Michael Hall

Today I reached another milestone in my open source journey: I got my first package uploaded into Debian’s archives.  I’ve managed to get packages uploaded into Ubuntu before, and I’ve attempted to get one into Debian, but this is the first time I’ve actually gotten a contribution in that would benefit Debian users.

I couldn’t have done with without the the help and mentorship of Paul Tagliamonte, but I was also helped by a number of others in the Debian community, so a big thank you to everybody who answered my questions and walked me through getting setup with things like Alioth and re-learning how to use SVN.

One last bit of fun, I was invited to join the Linux Unplugged podcast today to talk about yesterday’s post, you can listen it it (and watch IRC comments scroll by) here: http://www.jupiterbroadcasting.com/51842/neckbeard-entitlement-factor-lup-28/

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olli

With UDS just around the corner (11-13 March 2014, 2pm-8pm UTC) we wanted to give you a quick update where things stand in the 14.04 cycle. The teams have been busy working towards the goals for the 14.04 cycle, with a focus on the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release, the App Developer Program and of course Ubuntu for Phones. […]

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Michael Hall

Today was a distracting day for me.  My homeowner’s insurance is requiring that I get my house re-roofed[1], so I’ve had contractors coming and going all day to give me estimates. Beyond just the cost, we’ve been checking on state licensing, insurance, etc.  I’ve been most shocked at the differences in the level of professionalism from them, you can really tell the ones for whom it is a business, and not just a job.

But I still managed to get some work done today.  After a call with Francis Ginther about the API website importers, we should soon be getting regular updates to the current API docs as soon as their source branch is updated.  I will of course make a big announcement when that happens

I didn’t have much time to work on my Debian contributions today, though I did join the DPMT (Debian Python Modules Team) so that I could upload my new python-model-mommy package with the DPMT as the Maintainer, rather than trying to maintain this package on my own.  Big thanks to Paul Tagliamonte for walking me through all of these steps while I learn.

I’m now into my second week of UbBloPoMo posts, with 8 posts so far.  This is the point where the obligation of posting every day starts to overtake the excitement of it, but I’m going to persevere and try to make it to the end of the month.  I would love to hear what you readers, especially those coming from Planet Ubuntu, think of this effort.

[1] Re-roofing, for those who don’t know, involves removing and replacing the shingles and water-proofing paper, but leaving the plywood itself.  In my case, they’re also going to have to re-nail all of the plywood to the rafters and some other things to bring it up to date with new building codes.  Can’t be too safe in hurricane-prone Florida.

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bmichaelsen

LibreOffice bugzilla status

Im kind of over gettin told to throw my hands up in the air

so there

Team, Pure Herione, Lorde

So, somewhere between the LibreOffice 4.2.0 and the 4.1.5 release, bugs.freedesktop.org broke through 25.000 reported bugs. A time to throw the hands up in despair? Not at all, as the following chart shows:

LibreOffice bug states on freedesktop

LibreOffice bug states on freedesktop

  • 7% of reports are still unconfirmed or need more information
  • 22% are confirmed and unresolved issues, that are not enhancements requests
  • 6.5% are unresolved enhancement requests.

On the other hand:

  • 33% of all reports have been fixed in some way
  • and 30% are invalid or duplicates.

Its interesting to see how now a quarter of the confirmed unresolved reports are asking for new features and enhancements. Its gets even more encouraging, if you take into account that the number of bugs reports is at a long term constant 20-25 reports per day, while over 40% of the bugs intentionally or collaterally fixed changed their state in the last 12 month. So we are picking up speed in triaging and fixing bugs, while the influx of new reports stays constant.

If you are interested, please help QA quite a bit in all this by writing good bug reports, identifying duplicates, confirming new reports, bibisecting regressions, run and test daily builds and prereleases or otherwise helping with the QA Easy Hacks!


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Michael Hall

Quick overview post today, because it’s late and I don’t have anything particular to talk about today.

First of all, the next vUDS was announced today, we’re a bit late in starting it off but we wanted to have another one early enough to still be useful to the Trusty release cycle.  Read the linked mailinglist post for details about where to find the schedule and how to propose sessions.

I pushed another update to the API website today that does a better job balancing the 2-column view of namespaces and fixes the sub-nav text to match the WordPress side of things. This was the first deployment in a while to go off without a problem, thanks to  having a new staging environment created last time.  I’m hoping my deployment problems on this are now far behind me.

I took a task during my weekly Core Apps update call to look more into the Terminal app’s problem with enter and backspace keys, so I may be pinging some of you in the coming week about it to get some help.  You have been warned.

Finally, I decided a few weeks ago to spread out my after-hours community a activity beyond Ubuntu, and I’ve settled on the Debian new maintainers Django website as somewhere I can easily start.  I’ve got a git repo where I’m starting writing the first unit tests for that website, and as part of that I’m also working on Debian packaging for the Python model-mommy library which we use extensively in Ubuntu’s Django website. I’m having to learn (or learn more) Debian packaging, Git workflows and Debian’s processes and community, all of which are going to be good for me, and I’m looking forward to the challenge.

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Michael Hall

We wrapped up the last day of our sprint with a new team photo.  I can honestly say I couldn’t think of a better group of people to be working with.  Even the funny looking guy in the middle.

I mentioned that earlier in the week we decided on naming SDK releases after distro releases, and with that information in hand I spent my last day getting the latest API docs uploaded, so if you’re writing apps for the latest device images, you’ll want to use these: http://developer.ubuntu.com/api/qml/sdk-14.04/

In the coming week I’ll be working to get the documentation publishing scripts added to the automated build and testing process, so those docs will be continuously updated until the release of Ubuntu 14.04, at which point we’ll freeze those doc pages and start publishing daily updates for 14.10.  Being able to publish  all of those docs in a matter of minutes was a particularly thrill for me, after working for so long to get that feature into production.  It certainly proves that it was the right approach.

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