Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'ubuntu'

pitti

I’ve had the pleasure of working on Ubuntu for 12½ years now, and during that time used up an entire Latin alphabet of release names! (Well, A and C are still free, but we used H and W twice, so on average.. ☺ ) This has for sure been the most exciting time in my life with tons of good memories! Very few highlights:

  • Getting some spam mail from a South African multi-millionaire about a GREAT OPPORTUNITY
  • Joining #warthogs (my first IRC experience) and collecting my first bounties for “derooting” Debian (i. e. drop privileges from root daemons and suid binaries)
  • Getting invited to Oxford to meet a bunch of people for which I had absolutely zero proof of existence, and tossing myself into debts for buying a laptop for that occasion
  • Once being there, looking into my fellows’ stern and serious faces and being amazed by their professionalism:
  • The excitement and hype around going public with Warty Warthogs Beta
  • Meeting lots of good folks at many UDSes, with great ideas and lots of enthusiasm, and sometimes “Bags of Death”. Group photo from Ubuntu Down Under:
  • Organizing UDSes without Launchpad or other electronic help:
     
  • Playing “Wish you were Here” with Bill, Tony, Jono, and the other All Stars
  • Seeing bug #1 getting closed, and watching the transformation of Microsoft from being TEH EVIL of the FOSS world to our business partner
  • Getting to know lots of great places around the world. My favourite: luring a few colleagues for a “short walk through San Francisco” but ruining their feet with a 9 hour hike throughout the city, Golden Gate Park and dipping toes into the Pacific.
  • Seeing Ubuntu grow from that crazy idea into one of the main pillars of the free software world
  • ITZ GTK BUG!
  • Getting really excited when Milbank and the Canonical office appeared in the Harry Potter movie
  • Moving between and getting to know many different teams from the inside (security, desktop, OEM, QA, CI, Foundations, Release, SRU, Tech Board, …) to appreciate and understand the value of different perspectives
  • Breaking burning wood boards, making great and silly videos, and team games in the forest (that was La Mola) at various All Hands

But all good things must come to an end — after tossing and turning this idea for a long time, I will leave Canonical at the end of the year. One major reason for me leaving is that after that long time I am simply in need for a “reboot”: I’ve piled up so many little and large things that I can hardly spend one day on developing something new without hopelessly falling behind in responding to pings about fixing low-level stuff, debugging weird things, handholding infrastructure, explaining how things (should) work, do urgent archive/SRU/maintenance tasks, and whatnot (“it’s related to boot, it probably has systemd in the name, let’s hand it to pitti”). I’ve repeatedly tried to rid myself of some of those or at least find someone else to share the load with, but it’s too sticky :-/ So I spent the last few weeks with finishing some lose ends and handing over some of my main responsibilities.

Today is my last day at work, which I spend mostly on unsubscribing from package bugs, leaving Launchpad teams, and catching up with emails and bugs, i. e. “clean up my office desk”. From tomorrow on I’ll enjoy some longer EOY holidays, before starting my new job in January.

I got offered to work on Cockpit, on the product itself and its ties into the Linux plumbing stack (storaged/udisks, systemd, and the like). So from next year on I’ll change my Hat to become Red instead of orange. I’m curious to seeing for myself how that other side of the fence looks like!

This won’t be a personal good-bye. I will continue to see a lot of you Ubuntu folks on FOSDEMs, debconfs, Plumber’s, or on IRC. But certainly much less often, and that’s the part that I regret most — many of you have become close friends, and Canonical feels much more like a family than a company. So, thanks to all lof you for being on that journey with me, and of course a special and big Thank You to Mark Shuttleworth for coming up with this great Ubuntu vision and making all of this possible!

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deviceguy

Like it says on the Intel IoT developer site, "Without sensors, there's no IoT".

Because I am the maintainer of QtSensors, I like to inquire about  people's use of sensors and if they use QtSensors. Over the years, I have heard quite often something like, 'Qt is thought of as a UI framework'. *sigh*
 
But Qt is more than just a UI framework and it's use is not dependent on widgets or declarative wizardry. It is used in quite a few middleware components without UI elements. One of those middleware frameworks is Sensor Framework.

Sensor framework is a daemon that uses a plugin system written using Qt for reading various sensors such as accelerometer or light sensors. It was originally developed by Nokia for Harmattan and ran on the N9. It was also used in MeeGo and later included in the Mer Project and on Jolla phones and the ill fated tablet. So it has been released onto a few commercial products.

We looked at it when I was working at Nokia on the project that I still cannot name, but we had decided we would come up with our own solution. Looking back, this was the wrong decision, we should have taken the already proven sensor framework and ran with that. Why? Because it existed and works.

I started maintaining it when I was a privateer (contractor) developer for Jolla. No one else had touched it for some time so I grabbed the few not yet merged bug fixes and added support for libhybris/android libhardware adaptors.

Sensor Framework has support for multiple clients with down sampling for different data rates. It uses dbus for control lines (to start and stop, etc) but sends data through a socket. It also has a working backend in QtSensors.

I noticed that Ubuntu's Unity does nothing to respond when I put this into "tablet mode". I have to manually open the virtual keyboard among other things.

So I thought I could use sensorfw on my Dell 2 in 1. It's one of those converged laptop/tablet devices. It has a few sensors - accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetometer, and lid sensors. One problem... sensorfw does not support lid sensors, or a few other sensors that are around today in IoT (which I will add a bit later). Lid "sensor" might be a bit of a misnomer, as they could be switches but I'd like to think it is more like a hal effect sensor that uses magnets. In any case there are event nodes to use.

First one I chose is to add the lid sensor - to detect when this machine is put into tablet mode, so the UI can better deal with it.

I also noticed that this kernel has support for iio sensor interface for the accel and gyro. Sensorfw only supports sysfs, evdev and hybris interfaces, so I also wanted to add support for that.

I worked on adding iio support first. Well... really just wrote a sensor adaptor plugin. My plugin supports accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer, which this device seems to have. I will expand this to support other sensors later, as well as clean it up a bit.

Thanks to QtSensors sensor framework backend, I can make a UI app change with the orientation and lid changes. Better yet, I can create a game that uses accelerometer data like a marble maze game. Or I can upload the data to one of those Node.js data visualization web apps.

And since sensor framework is opensource, others can as well.


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Leo Arias

All Linux distributions are constantly updating the versions of the packages in their archives. That’s what makes them great, lots of people working in a distributed way to let you easily update your software and get the latest features or critical bug fixes.

And you should constatly update your operating system. Otherwise you’ll become an easy target for criminals exploiting known vulnerabilities.

The problem, at least for me, is that I have many many Ubuntu machines in the house and my badwidth is really bad. So keeping all my real machines, virtual machines and various devices up-to-date every day has become a slow problem.

The solution is to cache the downloaded deb packages. So only one machine has to make the downloads from the internet, and they will be kept in my local network to make much faster to get the packages in the other machines.

So let me introduce you to Apt-Cacher NG.

Setting it up is simple. First, choose a machine to run the cacher and store the packages. Ideally, this machine should be running all the time, and should have a good amount of storage space. I’m using my desktop as the cacher; but as soon as I update my router to one that runs Ubuntu, I will make that one the cacher.

On that machine, install apt-cacher-ng:

  sudo apt install apt-cacher-ng

And that’s it. The cacher is installed and configured. Now we need the name of this machine to use it on the other ones:

  $ hostname
  calchas

In this example, calchas is the name of the machine I’m using as the cacher. Take note of the name of your machine, and now, in all the other machines:

  $ sudo gedit /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/02proxy

That will create a new empty configuration file for apt, and open it to be edited with gedit, the default graphical editor in Ubuntu. In the editor, write this:

  Acquire::http::proxy "http://calchas.lan:3142";

replacing calchas with the name of your cacher machine, collected above. The .lan part is really only needed when you are setting it up in a virtual machine and the host is the same as the cacher, but it doesn’t hurt to add it on real machines. That number, 3142, is the network port where the caching service is running, leave it unchanged.

After that, the first time you update a package in your network it will be slow just as before. But all the other machines updating the same package will be very fast. I have to thank apt-cacher-ng for saving me many hours during my updates of the past years.

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ssweeny

My team at work has been focused on snaps this year and one thing we’ve tried to do internally is establish a set of best practices for snap packaging software. Toward that end I’ve been working on a little tool I’m calling snaplint to encode those practices and verify that we’re following them.

Right now you can run snaplint against your snapcraft project directory
and it will scan the prime subdirectory for the following things:

  • copyright (basically that you included usr/share/doc/*copyright*) for
    any stage-packages
  • developer cruft (things like header and object files or static libs
    that might have made their way into your snap)
  • libraries (examine the ELF files in your snap and look for libraries
    which aren’t used)

The next things I’m planning on adding are:

  • checking for copyright info from apps/parts themselves.
  • checking for mixing of incompatible licenses

I would love to hear suggestions on further improvements.

You can find the source at https://github.com/ssweeny/snaplint

And, of course if you’re running Ubuntu 16.04 or later you can try it on your own machine with:
$ snap install snaplint
$ snaplint path/to/your/project

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Dustin Kirkland


From Linux kernel livepatches to encryption to ASLR to compiler optimizations and configuration hardening, we strive to ensure that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is the most secure Linux distribution out of the box.

These slides try to briefly explain:

  • what we do to secure Ubuntu
  • how the underlying technology works
  • when the features took effect in Ubuntu

I hope you find this slide deck informative and useful!  The information herein is largely collected from the Ubuntu Security Features wiki page, where you can always find up to date information.



Cheers,
Dustin

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Leo Arias

We have survived two testing days, and now we can safely say that it will become a Friday tradition :)

Last Friday our nice guest was Aaron Ogle, from Rocket Chat. He gave us a tour on the Rocket Chat UI and we discussed about how they packaged it as a snap.

If you missed it, click the image below to watch it.

Alt text

Building from what we saw on the first session, we tested the snap using a virtual machine again. But this time, we cloned it to keep a pristine machine and make following testing sessions faster. If you want to help the Ubuntu and Rocket Chat communities, this is an easy way to prepare your environment:

Once you have your clone ready, install the most recent and bleeding edge version of rocket chat with:

$ sudo snap install rocketchat-server --edge

Then you can follow this gist with the initial steps to start testing the Rocket Chat snap

Also you can test a real installation of Rocket Chat, joining our community channel, where we are available all day, every day. If you have a question, just ask. I am elopio in there.

During the session we took a look at the GitHub website, where many free software communities do their development in the open. They have a great guide to start contributing to open source projects. Go on and spread your love for free software in the form of bug reports :)

The gratitude this week goes to our newly acquired staff members Julia and Kyle, and of course to Aaron for letting us have a funny Friday evening. Make sure to take a look at the cool things he and his teammates are doing; and if you have some free time and want to join an exciting, open and nice community, give them a hand. Also try the Jitsi integration for video conference, it's mind-blowing that there are no closed components anywhere.

See you next Friday at Ubuntu On-Air.

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Leo Arias

The basic idea of using virtual machines for testing is to always start from a clean state, as close as possible to what a user would get after freshly installing the system on their real machines.

So, every time we need to test something, we could create a new virtual machine and intall Ubuntu from scratch there, but that would take a considerable amount of time.

An alternative is to install a machine once, and keep it clean. Never test in that one, and instead clone it every time you need to test something. Use the clone to experiment, and delete it when you are done. Cloning the machine is a lot faster than reinstalling each time. The base machine, the one you clone everytime, is called a pristine machine. If you are careful with it, the only time you will need to reinstall is when you are testing the installer.

Cloning the pristine machine using Virtual Machine Manager is really simple, it’s done in like two clicks.

First, of course, you will need to install your pristine machine. I always put pristine in the name, to make it less likely that I will start using it for testing. Every time I forget and play with the pristine machine, I’m polluting its state, and have to recreate it.

With the pristine machine ready, I then recommend to open it and run in a terminal:

  sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade

That will update all the packages installed, so your clone starts also in the most up-to-date state. If you do this step every time, you will never have to wait for long while your machine downloads and installs lots of packages, just wait a little every day.

image

Now shut down the pristine machine and don’t touch it again, only to update it.

To clone it, right click on it and then click the Clone... button.

image

A dialog will be opened, where you can enter the new virtual machine details.

image

I always write the date as part of the name, to remember when I created it. But the most important thing to do here is to make sure that the Storage option is set to Clone this disk. Otherwise, you will be sharing the disk with the pristine machine, which will pollute its state, the exact thing we are trying to avoid.

This will take some time while the whole disk is copied. But not long, and once it’s done you can freely play and pollute this clone, without affecting the pristine machine.

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Leo Arias

Today we had our first testing day. We will keep doing this every Friday, and at the end of the session I will post a summary with links to follow up and learn more about the subject in case somebody is interested.

You can watch the video by clicking the image below.

Alt text

For this session we had Kyle Fazzari talking about his work as the maintainer of the Nextcloud snap.

You can find more info about the project in the Nextcloud main page and more info about the snap in Kyle's blog.

We tested the snap using a virtual machine. To set one up you can use the following guides:

After the virtual machine is ready, Nextcloud can be installed in there by just running in the terminal:

$ sudo snap install nextcloud

If you want to test an unreleased and unstable version to help the Nextcloud developers, you can add the flag --edge or --beta to that command.

I wrote some steps to guide you getting started with the testing in this gist.

And finally, if you want to join our community, we are usually in Rocket Chat. You can join the #community, #qa or #snapcraft channels, or any other that catches your attention.

Special thanks to Julia and CoderEurope for joining us during the session. And of course to Kyle and the Nextcloud community for this amazing piece of free software that encourages everybody to take control over their data, in a really simple way.

You are all invited to join us the next time, which will be Friday, December 2nd, again at Ubuntu On-Air. The time and theme will be announced soon. Or at least before it starts.

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Daniel Holbach

ucaday-64pxIt’s 20th November 2016, so today marks another Ubuntu Community Appreciation Day. The idea for the event was put together by Ahmed Shams in 2011 and it’s simple but brilliant: once a year (at least), take the time to thank some specific people for their work in Ubuntu.

As I’m at UbuCon Europe this weekend, it’s incredibly easy to pick somebody whose work I’m grateful for. Today I’d like to thank all the event organisers in the Ubuntu world. Without people like Sujeevan Vijayakumaran (in the case of UbuCon Europe), we as a community, wouldn’t be able to get together, learn from each other and have fun together. It takes a set of special skills to organise big and small events, plan ahead, talk to various people and companies, organise sponsors and helpers and it’s something we often take too much for granted.

Thank you everyone who organised the Ubuntu events I’ve been to over the years, no matter if it’s the small meetings in a bar or the crazy big events, like UDSes (thanks Claire, Marianna and Michelle!). You are incredible rockstars and I had some of my best times thanks to you!

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Daniel Holbach

Ubuntu Online SummitEarlier this week the Ubuntu community was busy with the Ubuntu Online Summit. If you head to the schedule page, you can watch all the sessions which happened.

As I’m interested in snaps a lot, I’d like to highlight some of the sessions which happened there, so if you missed them, you can go back and see what happened there:

  • Intro and keynote by Gustavo Niemeyer
    Gustavo (amongst others projects he is involved with) is one of the lead developers of snapd. During his keynote he gives an overview over what the team has been working on in the last time and explains which features all landed in the snap world recently. It quickly gives you an idea of the pace of development and the breadth of new features which landed.
  • Creating your first snap
    This is a session I gave. Unfortunately Didier couldn’t make it as he had lost his voice in the days before. We both worked together on the content for this. Basically, if you’re new to using and creating snaps, watch this. It’s a series of very simple steps you can follow along and gives you enough background to see the bigger picture.
  • Snap roadmap and Q&A
    This was a fun session with Michael Vogt and Zygmunt Krynicki. They are also both lead developers of snapd and they share a lot of their thoughts in their own very fun and very interesting way. After some discussion of the roadmap, they dived right into the almost endless stream of questions. If you want to get an idea of what’s coming up and some of the more general decisions behind snaps, watch this one.
  • Building snaps in Launchpad
    Colin Watson gave this demo of a beautiful new feature in Launchpad. Starting from a github repo (the source could live elsewhere too), the source is pulled into Launchpad, snaps are built for selected releases of Ubuntu and selected architectures and directly pushed to the store. It’s incredibly easy to set up, complements your CI process and makes building on various architectures and publishing the snaps trivial. Thanks a lot for everybody’s work on this!

The other sessions were great too, this is just what I picked up from the world of snaps.

Enjoy watching the videos and share them please!

Thanks a lot to all the session leads as well!

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Daniel Holbach

Ubuntu Online Summit coming up 15-16 Nov

Ubuntu Online Summit

Ubuntu Online Summit is here again! 15th and 16th November 2016 we are talking about the great stuff which landed in Ubuntu 16.10 and we talk about our plans for 17.04.

Now is the last call for adding sessions, find out how to do that here.

See you all next week!

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bmichaelsen

Meist scheint manches auf den ersten Blick unmöglich.
Manches ist es auch, doch es wäre tödlich, das selbst zu glauben solange noch nichts feststeht
und die Party zu verlassen, bevor sie losgeht.

— Die Sterne, Stell die Verbindung her

Yesterday, two nice things happened: For one, LibreOffice 5.2.3 has been released and secondly Ubuntu Core 16 has been released. But beyond that, something in the middle between these two has happened: LibreOffice 5.2.3 has been released to the stable channel of the snap store at the same day. Now LibreOffice has been in the snap store for some time — and has also been on the stable channel since the Ubuntu 16.10 release. But this is the first time the LibreOffice snap is released in sync with The Document Foundation announcing the general availability of the final downloads. This was possible even though I was on vacation yesterday: LibreOffice snap packages are now being build on launchpad, which simplifies a lot, and launchpad can be asked to populate the edge channel of the store. This is making life very easy. Having smoketested the amd64 build from that channel before, to release LibreOffice 5.2.3 to the beta/candidate/stable channels too all I had to do was push three buttons on a web interface and it was available to all.

Building on launchpad, I also had the opportunity to create builds for armhf and i386 along with the usual amd64 builds with little extra effort. If you are adventurous you are encouraged to test these builds too: Be aware though that these so far aren’t even smoketested, I havent looked at them at all yet, so use them at your own risk.

All in all, this is great progress: LibreOffice 5.2.3 is available to users of Ubuntu 16.10 and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS as a snap on the day of the upstream release. And beyond that on all other distributions where snap is available — quite a few these days.

Update: ICYMI here is how to get the LibreOffice snap: http://www.libreoffice.org/download/snap/ — although strictly speaking you dont need the --channel=beta option anymore now. I will fix that soon.


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Dustin Kirkland

If you haven't heard about last week's Dirty COW vulnerability, I hope all of your Linux systems are automatically patching themselves...


Why?  Because every single Linux-based phone, router, modem, tablet, desktop, PC, server, virtual machine, and absolutely everything in between -- including all versions of Ubuntu since 2007 -- was vulnerable to this face-palming critical security vulnerability.

Any non-root local user of a vulnerable system can easily exploit the vulnerability and become the root user in a matter of a few seconds.  Watch...


Coincidentally, just before the vulnerability was published, we released the Canonical Livepatch Service for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.  The thousands of users who enabled canonical-livepatch on their Ubuntu 16.04 LTS systems with those first few hours received and applied the fix to Dirty COW, automatically, in the background, and without rebooting!

If you haven't already enabled the Canonical Livepatch Service on your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS systems, you should really consider doing so, with 3 easy steps:
  1. Go to https://ubuntu.com/livepatch and retrieve your livepatch token
  2. Install the canonical-livepatch snap
    $ sudo snap install canonical-livepatch 
  3. Enable the service with your token
    $ sudo canonical-livepatch enable [TOKEN]
And you’re done! You can check the status at any time using:

$ canonical-livepatch status --verbose

Let's retry that same vulnerability, on the same system, but this time, having been livepatched...


Aha!  Thwarted!

So that's the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS kernel space...  What about userspace?  Most of the other recent, branded vulnerabilities (Heartbleed, ShellShock, CRIME, BEAST) have been critical vulnerabilities in userspace packages.

As of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, the unattended-upgrades package is now part of the default package set, so you should already have it installed on your Ubuntu desktops and servers.  If you don't already have it installed, you can install it with:

$ sudo apt install unattended-upgrades

And moreover, as of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, the unattended-upgrades package automatically downloads and installs important security updates once per day, automatically patching critical security vulnerabilities and keeping your Ubuntu systems safe by default.  Older versions of Ubuntu (or Ubuntu systems that upgraded to 16.04) might need to enable this behavior using:

$ sudo dpkg-reconfigure unattended-upgrades


With that combination enabled -- (1) automatic livepatches to your kernel, plus (2) automatic application of security package updates -- Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is the most secure Linux distribution to date.  Period.

Mooooo,
:-Dustin

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Grazina Borosko

The Yakkety Yak 16.10 is released and now you can download the new wallpaper by clicking here. It’s the latest part of the set for the Ubuntu 2016 releases following Xenial Xerus. You can read about our wallpaper visual design process here.

Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak

yakkety_yak_wallpaper_4096x2304

Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak (light version)

yakkety_yak_wallpaper_4096x2304_grey_version

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Dustin Kirkland

My wife, Kimberly, and I watch Saturday Night Live religiously.  As in, we probably haven't missed a single episode since we started dating more than 12 years ago.  And in fact, we both watched our fair share of SNL before we had even met, going back to our teenage years.

We were catching up on SNL's 42nd season premier late this past Sunday night, after putting the kids to bed, when I was excited to see a hilarious sketch/parody of Mr. Robot.

If SNL is my oldest TV favorite, Mr. Robot is certainly my newest!  Just wrapping its 2nd season, it's a brilliantly written, flawlessly acted, impeccably set techno drama series on USA.  I'm completely smitten, and the story seems to be just getting started!

Okay, so Kim and I are watching a hilarious sketch where Leslie Jones asks Elliot to track down the person who recently hacked her social media accounts.  And, as always, I take note of what's going in the background on the computer screen.  It's just something I do.  I love to try and spot the app, the OS, the version, identify the Linux kernel oops, etc., of anything on any computer screen on TV.

At about the 1:32 mark of the SNL/Mr.Robot skit, there was something unmistakable on the left computer, just over actor Pete Davidson's right shoulder.  Merely a fraction of a second, and I recognized it instantly!  A dark terminal, split into a dozen sections.  A light grey boarder, with a thicker grey highlighting one split.  The green drip of text from The Matrix in one of the splits. A flashing, bouncing yellow audio wave in another.  An instant rearrangement of all of those windows each second.

It was Byobu and Hollywood!  I knew it.  Kim didn't believe me at first, until I proved it ;-)

A couple of years ago, after seeing a 007 film in the theater, I created a bit of silliness -- a joke of a program that could turn any Linux terminal into a James Bond caliber hacker screen.  The result is a package called hollywood, which any Ubuntu user can install and run by simply typing:

$ sudo apt install hollywood
$ hollywood

And a few months ago , Hollywood found its way into an NBC News piece that took itself perhaps a little too seriously, as it drummed up a bit of fear around "Ransomware".

But, far more appropriately, I'm absolutely delighted to see another NBC program -- Saturday Night Live -- using Hollywood exactly as intended -- for parody!

Enjoy a few screenshots below...








Cheers!
:-Dustin

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Victor Palau

Ok, ok.. sorry for the click-bait headline – but It is mainly true.. I recently got a Nextcloud box , it was pretty easy to set up and here are some great instructions.

But this box is not just a Nextcloud box, it is  a box of unlimited possibilities. In just a few hours I added to my personal cloud  a WIFI access point and  chat server.   So here are some amazing facts you should know about Ubuntu and snaps:

Amazing fact #1 – One box, many apps

With snaps you can transform you single function device, into a box of tricks. You can add software to extend its functionality after you have made it. In this case I created an WIFI access point and added a Rocketchat server to it.

You can release a drone without autonomous capabilities, and once you are sure that you have nailed, you can publish a new app for it… or even sale a pro-version autopilot snap.

You can add an inexpensive Zigbee and Bluetooth module to your home router, and partner with a security firm to provide home surveillance services.. The possibilities are endless.

Amazing fact #2 – Many boxes, One heart

Maybe an infinite box of tricks is attractive to a geek like me,  but what it is interesting is product makers is :make one hardware, ship many products.

Compute parts (cpu,memory,storage) make a large part of  bill of materials of any smart device. So does validation and integration of this components with your software base… and then you need to provide updates for the OS and the kernel for years to come.

What if I told you could build (or buy) a single multi-function core – pre-integrated with a Linux OS  and use it to make drones, home routers, digital advertisement signs, industrial and home automation hubs, base stations, DSLAMs, top-of-rack switches,…

This is the real power of Ubuntu Core, with the OS and kernel being their own snaps – you can be sure the nothing has changes in them across these devices, and that you can reliably update of them.  You not only are able to share validation and maintenance cost across multiple projects, you would be able to increase the volume of your part order and get a better price.

20160927_101912

How was the box of tricks made:

Ingredients for the WIFI ap:

 

I also installed the Rocketchat server  snap for the store.

 


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bmichaelsen

Merging Communities

Come together, right now
— Beatles, Abbey Road, Come together

So September, 28th 2016 is the 6th birthday of LibreOffice and at the recent conference, we took a picture of those who were there on day zero:

brno32

As you might notice, I am not on that picture — on day zero I was working at Oracle, and were surprised by the news — like many others in this picture:

brno30

This is everyone at this years LibreOffice conference who used to work on the OpenOffice.org codebase at StarDivision, Sun or Oracle. A few people are in both pictures: Caolán McNamara and Thorsten Behrens were with LibreOffice from the start, but also worked at the OpenOffice.org team in Hamburg at some point in time. Of those working on OpenOffice.org still when LibreOffice started, I was the first to join LibreOffice — I had quit my job for that. It was an exciting time.

Looking back, both of these groups appear small — mostly because merging them, the LibreOffice community became so much more that the sum of its parts:

brno23

And of course, while a lot of people were at the conference, not everyone could
join, so there are more contributors from each of these groups than are in the
pictures. This years “state of the project” presentation showed again that the members of The Document Foundation are a truly worldwide community:

tdf-members

So, like the branches of the different descendants of OpenOffice.org, the
contributors and communities did come together in Brno to push
LibreOffice forward as one!


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Michael Hall

KDE Neon developer Harald Sitter was able to package up the KDE calculator, kcalc, in a snap that weighs in at a mere 320KB! How did he do it?

KCalc and KDE Frameworks snaps

Like most applications in KDE, kcalc depends on several KDE Frameworks (though not all), sets of libraries and services that provide the common functionality and shared UI/UX found in KDE and it’s suite of applications. This means that, while kcalc is itself a small application, it’s dependency chain is not. In the past, any KDE application snap had to include many megabytes of platforms dependencies, even for the smallest app.

Recently I introduced the new “content” interface that has been added to snapd. I used this interface to share plugin code with a text editor, but Harald has taken it even further and created a KDE Frameworks snap that can share the entire platform with applications that are built on it!

While still in the very early stages of development, this approach will allow the KDE project to deliver all of their applications as independent snaps, while still letting them all share the one common set of Frameworks that they depend on. The end result will be that you, the user, will get the very latest stable (or development!) version of the KDE platform and applications, direct from KDE themselves, even if you’re on a stable/LTS release of your distro.

If you are running a snap-capable distro, you can try these experimental packages yourself by downloading kde-frameworks-5_5.26_amd64.snap and kcalc_0_amd64.snap from Neon’s build servers, and installing them with “snap install –devmode –force-dangerous <snap_file>”. To learn more about how he did this, and to help him build more KDE application snaps, you can find Harald as <sitter> on #kde-neon on Freenode IRC.

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Dustin Kirkland


A couple of weeks ago, I delivered a talk at the Container Camp UK 2016.  It was an brilliant event, on a beautiful stage at Picturehouse Central in Picadilly Circus in London.

You're welcome to view the slides or download them as a PDF, or watch my talk below.

And for the techies who want to skip the slide fluff and get their hands dirty, setup your OpenStack and LXD and start streamlining your HPC workloads using this guide.




Enjoy,
:-Dustin

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Daniel Holbach

For a few weeks we have been running the Snappy Playpen as a pet/research project already. Many great things have happened since then:

  • With the Playpen we now have a repository of great best-practice examples.
  • We brought together a lot of people who are excited about snaps, who worked together, collaborated, wrote plugins together and improved snapcraft and friends.
  • A number of cloud parts were put together by the team as well.
  • We landed quite a few high-quality snaps in the store.
  • We had lots of fun.

Opening the Sandpit

With our next Snappy Playpen event tomorrow, 20th September 2016, we want to extend the scheme. We are opening the Sandpit part of the Playpen!

One thing we realised in the last weeks is that we treated the Playpen more and more like a place where well-working, tested and well-understood snaps go to inspire people who are new to snapping software. What we saw as well was that lots of fellow snappers kept their half-done snaps on their hard-disk instead of sharing them and giving others the chance to finish them or get involved in fixing. Time to change that, time for the Sandpit!

In the Sandpit things can get messy, but you get to explore and play around. It’s fun. Naturally things need to be light-weight, which is why we organise the Sandpit on just a simple wiki page. The way it works is that if you have a half-finished snap, you simply push it to a repo, add your name and the link to the wiki, so others get a chance to take a look and work together with you on it.

Tomorrow, 20th September 2016, we are going to get together again and help each other snapping, clean up old bits, fix things, explain, hang out and have a good time. If you want to join, you’re welcome. We’re on Gitter and on IRC.

  • WHEN: 2016-09-20
  • WHAT: Snappy Playpen event – opening the Sandpit
  • WHERE: Gitter and on IRC

Added bonus

As an added bonus, we are going to invite Michael Vogt, one of the core developers of snapd to the Ubuntu Community Q&A tomorrow. Join us at 15:00 UTC tomorrow on http://ubuntuonair.com and ask all the questions you always had!

See you tomorrow!

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