Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'ubuntu'

Daniel Holbach

Out of nowhere, the Ukrainian translations team came up and translated 70% (the threshold where we call translations ‘complete enough to be official’) of the Ubuntu Packaging Guide into Ukrainian. This all happened within just a couple of days.

All I can say is: amazing work and Дуже дякую (thanks a lot)! Keep it up

ukrainian-packaging-guide

We are going to prepare an upload to Debian and Ubuntu in the coming days as well. Again: fantastic work everyone.

Call for help

This post of course can’t go out without a call for help.

Thanks again translations community, you all are heroes. It’s you who makes Ubuntu welcoming to everyone!

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Timo Jyrinki

I recently obtained the newest Dell's Ubuntu developer offering, XPS 13 (2015, model 9343). I opted in for FullHD non-touch display, mostly because of better battery life, the actual no need for higher resolution, and matte screen which is great outside. Touch would have been "nice-to-have", but in my work I don't really need it.

The other specifications include i7-5600U CPU, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD [edit: lshw], and of course Ubuntu 14.04 LTS pre-installed as OEM specific installation. It was not possible to directly order it from Dell site, as Finland is reportedly not online market for Dell... The wholesale company however managed to get two models on their lists and so it's now possible to order via retailers. [edit: here are some country specific direct web order links however US, DE, FR, SE, NL]

In this blog post I give a quick look on how I started up using it, and do a few observations on the pre-installed Ubuntu included. I personally was interested in using the pre-installed Ubuntu like a non-Debian/Ubuntu developer would use it, but Dell has also provided instructions for Ubuntu 15.04, Debian 7.0 and Debian 8.0 advanced users among else. Even if not using the pre-installed Ubuntu, the benefit from buying an Ubuntu laptop is obviously smaller cost and on the other hand contributing to free software (by paying for the hardware enablement engineering done by or purchased by Dell).

Unboxing

The Black Box. (and white cat)

Opened box.






First time lid opened, no dust here yet!
First time boot up, transitioning from the boot logo to a first time Ubuntu video.
A small clip from the end of the welcoming video.
First time setup. Language, Dell EULA, connecting to WiFi, location, keyboard, user+password.
Creating recovery media. I opted not to do this as I had happened to read that it's highly recommended to install upgrades first, including to this tool.
Finalizing setup.
Ready to log in!
It's alive!
Not so recent 14.04 LTS image... lots of updates.

Problems in the First Batch

Unfortunately the first batch of XPS 13:s with Ubuntu are going to ship with some problems. They're easy to fix if you know how to, but it's sad that they're there to begin with in the factory image. There is no knowledge when a fixed batch will start shipping - July maybe?

First of all, installing software upgrades stops. You need to run the following command via Dash → Terminal once: sudo apt-get install -f (it suggests upgrading libc-dev-bin, libc6-dbg, libc6-dev and udev). After that you can continue running Software Updater as usual, maybe rebooting in between.

Secondly, the fixed touchpad driver is included but not enabled by default. You need to enable the only non-enabled ”Additional Driver” as seen in the picture below or instructed in Youtube.

Dialog enabling the touchpad driver.

Clarification: you can safely ignore the two paragraphs below, they're just for advanced users like me who want to play with upgraded driver stacks.

Optionally, since I'm interested in the latest graphics drivers especially in case of a brand new hardware like Intel Broadwell, I upgraded my Ubuntu to use the 14.04.2 Hardware Enablement stack (matches 14.10 hardware support): sudo apt install --install-recommends libgles2-mesa-lts-utopic libglapi-mesa-lts-utopic linux-generic-lts-utopic xserver-xorg-lts-utopic libgl1-mesa-dri-lts-utopic libegl1-mesa-drivers-lts-utopic libgl1-mesa-glx-lts-utopic:i386
 
Even though it's much better than a normal Ubuntu 14.10 would be since many of the Dell fixes continue to be in use, some functionality might become worse compared to the pre-installed stack. The only thing I have noticed though is the internal microphone not working anymore out-of-the-box, requiring a kernel patch as mentioned in Dell's notes. This is not a surprise since the real eventual upstream support involves switching from HDA to I2S and during 14.10 kernel work that was not nearly done. If you're excited about new drivers, I'd recommend waiting until August when the 15.04 based 14.04.3 stack is available (same package names, but 'vivid' instead of 'utopic'). [edit: I couldn't resist myself when I saw linux-generic-lts-vivid (3.19 kernel) is already in the archives. 14.04.2 + that gives me working microphone again!] [edit 08/2015: full 14.04.3 HWE stack now available, improves graphics performance and features among else, everything seems good: sudo apt install --install-recommends linux-generic-lts-vivid libgles2-mesa-lts-vivid libglapi-mesa-lts-vivid xserver-xorg-lts-vivid libgl1-mesa-dri-lts-vivid libegl1-mesa-lts-vivid libgl1-mesa-glx-lts-vivid:i386 libegl1-mesa-lts-vivid libwayland-egl1-mesa-lts-vivid mesa-vdpau-drivers-lts-vivid libgl1-mesa-dri-lts-vivid:i386 ]

Conclusion

Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is an extremely capable laptop + OS combination nearing perfection, but not quite there because of the software problems in the launch pre-install image. The laptop looks great, feels like a quality product should and is very compact for the screen size.

I've moved over all my work onto it and everything so far is working smoothly in my day-to-day tasks. I'm staying at Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and using my previous LXC configuration to run the latest Ubuntu and Debian development versions. I've also done some interesting changes already like LUKS In-Place Conversion, converting the pre-installed Ubuntu into whole disk encrypted one (not recommended for the faint hearted, GRUB reconfiguration is a bit of a pain).

I look happily forward to working a few productive years with this one!

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bmichaelsen

But I believe in this and it’s been tested by research
— The Clash, Death and Glory

Thanks to Norbert’s efforts, the LibreOffice project now has a Jenkins setup that not only gives us visibility on how healthy our master branch is, with the results being reported to the ESC regularly: In addition it allows everyone easily testing commits and branches on all major LibreOffice platforms (Linux, OS X, Windows) just by uploading a change to gerrit. Doing so is really easy once you are set up:

./logerrit submit                      # a little helper script in our repo
git push logerrit HEAD:refs/for/master # alternative: plain old git
git review                             # alternative: needs to install the git-review addon

Each of the above commands alone send your work for review and testbuilding to gerrit. The last one needs an additional setup, that is however really helpful and worth it for people working with gerrit from the command-line regulary.

So, what if you have a branch that you want to testbuild? Well, just pushing the branch to gerrit as suggested above still works: gerrit then will create a change for every commit, mark them as depending on each other and testbuild every commit. This is great for a small branch of a handful of commits, but will be annoying and somewhat wasteful for a branch with more than 10-15 commits. In the latter case you might not want a manual review for each commit and also not occupy our builders for each of them. So what’s the alternative, if you have a branch ${mybranch} and want to at least test the final commit to build fine everywhere?

git checkout -b ${mybranch}-ci ${mybranch} # switch to branch ${mybranch}-ci
git rebase -i remotes/logerrit/master      # rebase the branch on master interactively

Now your favourite editor comes up showing the commits of the branch. As your favourite editor will be vim, you can then type:

:2,$s/^pick/s/ | x

To squash all the commits of the branch into one commit. Then do:

git checkout -                                   # go back to whatever branch we where on before
git push logerrit ${mybranch}-ci:refs/for/master # push squashed branch to gerrit for testbuilding
git branch -D ${mybranch}-ci                     # optional: delete squashed branch locally

Now only wait for the builder on Jenkins to report back. This allowed me to find out that our compiler on OS X didnt think of this new struct as a POD-type, while our compilers on Linux and Windows where fine with it (see: “Why does C++ require a user-provided default constructor to default-construct a const object?” for the gory details). Testbuilding on gerrit allowed me to fix this before pushing something broken on a platform to master, which would have spoiled the nifty ability to test your commit before pushing for everyone else: Duly testing your commit on gerrit only to find that the master you build upon was broken by someone else on some platform is not fun.

The above allows you to ensure the end of your branch builds fine on all platforms. But what about the intermediate commits and our test-suites? Well, you can test that each and every commit passes tests quite easily locally:

git rebase -i remotes/logerrit/master --exec 'make check'

This rebases your branch on master (even if its already up to date) and builds and runs all the tests on each commit along the way. In case there is a test breakage, git stops and lets you fix things (just like with traditional troubles on rebases like changes not applying cleanly).

Note: gerrit will close the squashed branch change if you push the branch to master: The squashed commit message ends with the Change-Id of the final commit of the branch. So once that commit is pushed, the gerrit closes the review for the squashed change.

Another note: If the above git commands are too verbose for you (they are for me), consider using gitsh and aliases. Combined they help quite a lot in reducing redundant typing when working with git.


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Daniel Holbach

Daniel McGuire is unstoppable. The work I mentioned yesterday was great, here’s some more, showing what would happen when the user selects “Playing Music”.

help app - playing music

 

More feedback we received so far:

  • Kevin Feyder suggested using a different icon for the app.
  • Michał Prędotka asked if we were planning to add more icons/pictures and the answer is “yes, we’d love to if it doesn’t clutter up the interface too much”. We are going to start a call for help with the content soon.
  • Robin of ubuntufun.de asked the same thing as Michał and wondered where the translations were. We are going to look into that. He generally like the Ubuntu-like style.

Do you have any more feedback? Anything you’d like to look or work differently? Anything you’d like to help with?

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Daniel Holbach

Some of you might have noticed the Help app in the store, which has been around for a couple of weeks now. We are trying to make it friendlier and easier to use. Maybe you can comment and share your ideas/thoughts.

Apart from actual bugs and adding more and more useful content, we also wanted the app to look friendlier and be more intuitive and useful.

The latest trunk lp:help-app can be seen as version 0.3 in the store or if you run

bzr branch lp:help-app
less help-app/HACKING

you can run and check it out locally.

Here’s the design Daniel McGuire suggested going forward.

help-mockup

What are your thoughts? If you look at the content we currently have, how else would you expect the app to look like or work?

Thanks a lot Daniel for your work on this! :-)

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Michael Hall

Ubuntu is sponsoring the South East Linux Fest this year in Charlotte North Carolina, and as part of that event we will have a room to use all day Friday, June 12, for an UbuCon. UbuCon is a mini-conference with presentations centered around Ubuntu the project and it’s community.

I’m recruiting speakers to fill the last three hour-long slots, if anybody is willing and able to attend the conference and wants to give a presentation to a room full of enthusiastic Ubuntu users, please email me at mhall119@ubuntu.com. Topic can be anything Ubuntu related, design, development, client, cloud, using it, community, etc.

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Dustin Kirkland


In November of 2006, Canonical held an "all hands" event, which included a team building exercise.  Several teams recorded "Ubuntu commercials".

On one of the teams, Mark "Borat" Shuttleworth amusingly proffered,
"Ubuntu make wonderful things possible, for example, Linux appliance, with Ubuntu preinstalled, we call this -- the fridge!"


Nine years later, that tongue-in-cheek parody is no longer a joke.  It's a "cold" hard reality!

GE Appliances, FirstBuild, and Ubuntu announced a collaboration around a smart refrigerator, available today for $749, running Snappy Ubuntu Core on a Raspberry Pi 2, with multiple USB ports and available in-fridge accessories.  We had one in our booth at IoT World in San Francisco this week!










While the fridge prediction is indeed pretty amazing, the line that strikes me most is actually "Ubuntu make(s) wonderful things possible!"

With emphasis on "things".  As in, "Internet of Things."  The possibilities are absolutely endless in this brave new world of Snappy Ubuntu.  And that is indeed wonderful.

So what are you making with Ubuntu?!?

:-Dustin

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Daniel Holbach

snappyIt’d be a bit of a stretch to call UOS Snappy Online Summit, but Snappy definitely was talk of the town this time around. It was also picked up by tech news sites, who not always depicted Ubuntu’s plans accurately. :-)

Anyway… if you missed some of the sessions, you can always go back, watch the videos of the sessions and check the notes. Here’s the links to the sessions which already happened:

Which leaves us with today, 7th May 2015! You can still join these sessions today – we’ll be glad to hear your input and ideas! :-)

  • 14:00 UTC: Ubuntu Core Brainstorm – Calling all Snappy pioneers
    Snappy and Ubuntu Core are still hot off the press, but it’s already clear that they’re going to bring a lot of opportunities and will make the lives of developers a lot easier. Let’s get together, brainstorm and find out where Snappy can be used in the future, which communities/tools/frameworks can be joined by it, which software should be ported to it and which crazy nice tutorials/demos can be easily put together. Anything goes, join us, no matter if on IRC or in the hangout!
  • 16:00 UTC: Snappy Q&A
    Everything you always wanted to know about Snappy and Ubuntu Core. Bring your questions here! Bring your friends as well. We’ll make sure to have all the relevant experts here.
  • 18:00 UTC: Replace ifupdown with networkd on snappy / cloud / server for 16.04
    What the title says. Networkers, we’ll need you here. :-)

The above are just my suggestions, obviously there’s loads of other good stuff on the schedule today! See you later!

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Michael Hall

Ubuntu has been talking a lot about convergence lately, it’s something that we believe is going to be revolutionary and we want to be at the forefront of it. We love the idea of it, but so far we haven’t really had much experience with the reality of it.

image20150423_164034801I got my first taste of that reality two weeks ago, while at a work sprint in London. While Canonical has an office in London, it had other teams sprinting there, so the Desktop sprint I was at was instead held at a hotel. We planned to visit the office one day that week, it would be my first visit to any Canonical office, as well as my first time working at an actual office in several years. However, we also planned to meet up with the UK loco for release drinks that evening. This meant that we had to decide between leaving our laptops at the hotel, thus not having them to work on at the office, or taking them with us, but having to carry them around the pub all evening.

I chose to leave my laptop behind, but I did take my phone (Nexus 4 running Ubuntu) with me. After getting a quick tour of the office, I found a vacant seat at a desk, and pulled out my phone. Most of my day job can be done with the apps on my phone: I have email, I have a browser, I have a terminal with ssh, I can respond to our community everywhere they are active.

I spent the next couple of hours doing work, actual work, on my phone. The only problem I had was that I was doing it on a small screen, and I was burning through my battery. At one point I looked up and realized that the vacant desk I was sitting at was equipped with a laptop docking station. It had also a USB hub and an HDMI monitor cable available. If I had a slimport cable for my phone, I might have been able to plug it into this docking station and both power my phone and get a bigger screen to work with.

If I could have done that, I would have achieved the full reality of convergence, and it would have been just like if I had brought my laptop with me. Only with this I was able to simply slide it into my pocket when it was time to leave for drinks. It was tantalizingly close, I got a little taste of what it’s going to be like, and now I’m craving more of it.

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Daniel Holbach

Not sure if you saw Marks’ blog post earlier, but I’ll make sure to be watching the keynote at http://ubuntuonair.com/ at 14:00 UTC today. :-)

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Michael Hall

A couple of years ago the Ubuntu download page introduced a way for users to make a financial contribution to the ongoing development of Ubuntu and it’s surrounding projects and community. Later a program was established within Canonical to make the money donated specifically for supporting the community available directly to members of the community who would use it to benefit the wider project.

During the last month, at the request of members of the Ubuntu community and the Community Council, we have undertaken a review of the this program. While conducting a more thorough analysis of the what was donated to us and when, it was discovered that we made an error in our initial reporting, which has unfortunately affected the accuracy of all subsequent reports as well.

What Happened?

Our first report, published in May of 2014, combined the amounts donated to the community slider and the amounts dispersed to the community during the previous four financial quarters. In that report we listed the amount donated from April 2013 to June 2013 as being a total of $34,353.63. However, when looking over all of the quarterly donations going back to the start of the program, we realized that this amount actually covered donations made from April 2013 all the way to October 2013.

This means that the figure contains both the amount donated during that Apr-Jun quarter, as well as duplicating the amounts listed as being donated for the Jul-Sep quarter, and a part of the Oct-Dec quarter. The actual amount donated during just the Apr-Jun 2013 quarter was $15,726.72. As a result of this, and the fact that it affected the carry over balanced for all subsequent reports, I have gone back and corrected all of these to reflect the correct figures.

Now for the questions:

Where are the updated reports?

The reports have not moved, you can still access them from the previously published URLs, and they are also listed on a new Reports page on the community website. The original report data has been preserved in a copy which is linked to at the top of each revised report.

Where did the money go?

No money has been lost or taken away from the program, this change is only a correction to the actual state of things. We had originally over-stated the amount that was donated, due to an error when reading the raw donation data at the time the first report was written.

How could a mistake like this happen?

The information we get is a summary of a summary of the raw data. At some point in the process the wrong number was put in the wrong place. All of these reports are manually written and verified, which often catches errors such as this, but in the very first report this error was missed.

Are these numbers trustworthy?

I understand that a reduction in the balance number, in conjunction with questions being raised about the operation of the program, will lead some people to question the honesty of this change. But the fact remains that we were asked to investigate this, we did find a discrepant, and correcting it publicly is the right thing for us to do, regardless of how it may look.

Is the community funding program in trouble?

Absolutely not. Even with this correction there has been more money donated to the community slider than we have been able to use. There’s still a lot more good that can be done, if you think you have a good use for some of it please fill out a request.

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Daniel Holbach

Next week we are going to have another Ubuntu Online Summit (5-7 May 2015). This is (among many other things) a great time for you to get involved with, learn about and help shape Ubuntu Snappy.

As I said in my last blog post I’m very impressed to see the general level of interest in Ubuntu Snappy given how new it is. It’ll be great to see who is joining the sessions and who is going to get involved.

For those of you who are new to it: Ubuntu Online Summit is an open event, where we’ll plan in hangouts and IRC the next Ubuntu release. You can

  • tune in
  • ask questions
  • bring up ideas
  • get to know the team
  • help out :-)

This is the preliminary schedule. Sessions might still move around a bit, but be sure to register for the event and subscribe to the blueprint/session – that way you are going to be notified of ongoing work and discussion.

Tuesday, 5th May 2015

Wednesday, 6th May 2015

Thursday, 7th May 2015

Please note that we are likely going to add more sessions, so you should definitely keep your eyes open and check the schedule every now and then.

I’m looking forward to seeing you all and seeing us shape what Snappy is going to be! See you next week!

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Daniel Holbach

15.04 is out!

ubuntu.com

 

And another Ubuntu release went out the the door. I can’t believe that it’s the 22nd Ubuntu release already.

There’s a lot to be excited about in 15.04. The first phone powered by Ubuntu went out to customers and new devices are in the pipeline. The underpinnings of the various variants of Ubuntu are slowly converging, new Ubuntu flavours saw the light of day (MATE and Desktop next), new features landed, new apps added, more automated tests were added, etc. The future of Ubuntu is looking very bright.

What’s Ubuntu Core?

One thing I’m super happy about is a very very new addition: Ubuntu Core and snappy. What does it offer? It gives you a minimal Ubuntu system, automatic and bulletproof updates with rollback, an app store and very straight-forward enablement and packaging practices.

It has been brilliant to watch the snappy-devel@ and snappy-app-devel@ mailing lists in recent weeks and notice how much interest from enthusiasts, hobbyists, hardware manufacturers, porters and others get interested and get started. If you have a look at Dustin’s blog post, you get a good idea of what’s happening. It also features a video of Mark, who explains how Ubuntu has adapted to the demands of a changing IT world.

One fantastic example of how Ubuntu Snappy is already powering devices you had never thought of is the Erle-Copter. (If you can’t see the video, check out this link.)

It’s simply beautiful how product builders and hobbyists can now focus on what they’re interested in: building a tool, appliance, a robot, something crazy, something people will love or something which might change a small art of the world somewhere. What’s taken out of the equation by Ubuntu is: having to maintain a linux distro.

Maintaining a linux distro

Whenever I got a new device in my home I could SSH into, I was happy and proud. I always felt: “wow, they get it – they’re using open source software, they’re using linux”. This  feeling was replaced at some stage, when I realised how rarely my NAS or my router received system updates. When I checked for changelog entries of the updates I found out how only some of the important CVEs of the last year were mentioned, sometimes only “feature updates” were mentioned.

To me it’s clear that not all product builders or hardware companies collaborate with the NSA and create backdoors on purpose, but it’s hard work to maintain a linux stack and to do it responsibly.

That’s why I feel Ubuntu Core is an offering that “has legs” (as Mark Shuttleworth would say): as somebody who wants to focus on building a great product or solving a specific use case, you can do just that. You can ship your business logic in a snap on top of Ubuntu Core and be done with it. Brilliant!

What’s next?

Next week is Ubuntu Online Summit (5-7 May). There we are going to discuss the plans for the next time and that’s where you can get involved, ask questions, bring up your ideas and get to know the folks who are working on it now.

I’ll write a separate blog post in the coming days explaining what’s happening next week, until then feel free to have a look at:

 

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David Planella

Ubuntu Online Summit
The 15.04 release frenzy over, but the next big event in the Ubuntu calendar is just around the corner. In about a week, from the 5th to 7th of May, the next edition of the Ubuntu Online Summit is taking off. Three days of sessions for developers, designers, advocates, users and all members of our diverse community.

Along the developer-oriented discussions you’ll find presentations, workshops, lightning talks and much more. It’s a great opportunity for existing and new members to get together and contribute to the talks, watch a workshop to learn something new, or ask your questions to many of the rockstars who make Ubuntu.

While the schedule is being finalized, here’s an overview (and preview) of the content that you should expect in each one of the tracks:

  • App & scope development: the SDK and developer platform roadmaps, phone core apps planning, developer workshops
  • Cloud: Ubuntu Core on clouds, Juju, Cloud DevOps discussions, charm tutorials, the Charm, OpenStack
  • Community: governance discussions, community event planning, Q+As, how to get involved in Ubuntu
  • Convergence: the road to convergence, the Ubuntu desktop roadmap, requirements and use cases to bring the desktop and phone together
  • Core: snappy Ubuntu Core, snappy post-vivid plans, snappy demos and Q+As
  • Show & Tell: presentations, demos, lightning talks (read: things that break and explode) on a varied range of topics

Joining the summit is easy, you’ll just need to follow the instructions and register for free to the Ubuntu Online Summit >

UOS highlights: back to the desktop, snappy and the road to convergence

This is going to be perhaps one of the most important summits in recent times. After a successful launch of the phone, followed by the exciting announcement and delivery of snappy Ubuntu Core, Ubuntu is entering a new era. An era of lean, secure, minimal and modular systems that can run on the cloud, on Internet-enabled devices, on the desktop and virtually anywhere.

While the focus on development in the last few cycles has been on shaping up and implementing the phone, this doesn’t mean other key parts of the project have been left out. The phone has helped create the platform and tools that will ultimately bring all these projects together, into a converged code base and user experience. From desktop to phone, to the cloud, to things, and back to the desktop.

The Ubuntu 15.10 cycle begins, and so does this exciting new era. The Ubuntu Online Summit will be a unique opportunity to pave the road to convergence and discuss how the next generation of the Ubuntu desktop is built. So the desktop is back on the spotlight, and snappy will be taking the lead role in bringing Ubuntu for devices and desktop together. Expect a week of interesting discussions and of thinking out of the box to get there!

Participating in the Ubuntu Online Summit

Does this whet your appetite? Come and join us at the Summit, learn more and contribute to shaping the future of Ubuntu! There are different ways of taking part in the online event via video hangouts:

  • Participate or watch sessions – everyone is welcome to participate and join a discussion to provide input or offer contribution. If you prefer to take a rear seat, that’s fine too. You can either subscribe to sessions, watch them on your browser or directly join a live hangout. Just remember to register first and learn how to join a session.
  • Propose a session – do you want to take a more active role in contributing to Ubuntu? Do you have a topic you’d like to discuss, or an idea you’d like to implement? Then you’ll probably want to propose a session to make it happen. There is still a week for accepting proposals, so why don’t you go ahead and propose a session?

Looking forward to seeing you all at the Summit!

The post Announcing the next Ubuntu Online Summit appeared first on David Planella.

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Ben Howard

I am pleased to announce initial Vagrant images [1, 2]. These images are bit-for-bit the same as the KVM images, but have a Cloud-init configuration that allows Snappy to work within the Vagrant workflow.

Vagrant enables a cross platform developer experience on MacOS, Windows or Linux [3].

Note: due to the way that Snappy works, shared file systems within Vagrant is not possible at this time. We are working on getting the shared file system support enabled, but it will take us a little bit to get going.

If you want to use Vagrant packaged in the Ubuntu archives, in a terminal run::

  • sudo apt-get -y install vagrant
  • cd <WORKSPACE>
  • vagrant init http://goo.gl/DO7a9W 
  • vagrant up
  • vagrant ssh
If you use Vagrant from [4] (i.e Windows, Mac or install the latest Vagrant) then you can run:
  • vagrant init ubuntu/ubuntu-15.04-snappy-core-edge-amd64
  • vagrant up
  • vagrant ssh

These images are a work in progress. If you encounter any issues, please report them to "snappy-devel@lists.ubuntu.com" or ping me (utlemming) on Launchpad.net

---

[1] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/snappy/15.04/core/edge/current/core-edge-amd64-vagrant.box
[2] https://atlas.hashicorp.com/ubuntu/boxes/ubuntu-15.04-snappy-core-edge-amd64
[3] https://docs.vagrantup.com/v2/why-vagrant/index.html
[4] https://www.vagrantup.com/downloads.html

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Nicholas Skaggs

It's Show and Tell Time!

Err, show and tell?
Who remembers their first years of schooling? At least for me growing up in the US, those first years invovled an activity called 'Show and Tell'. We were instructed to bring something in from home and talk about it. This could be a picture or souvenir from a trip or unique life event, something we made, another person who does interesting things, or just something we found really interesting. It was a way for us to learn more about each other in the classroom, as well as share cool things with each other.


Online Summit
Ok, snapping you back to reality, it's nearing time for UOS 15.05. UOS is the Ubuntu Online Summit we hold each cycle to talk about what's happening in ubuntu. UOS 15.05 will be on May 5th - May 7th.

So what does the childhood version of me reminiscing about show and tell have to do with UOS? Well, I'm glad you asked! There is a 'Show and Tell' track available to everyone as a platform for sharing interesting and unique things with the rest of the community. These sessions can be very short (5 or 10 minutes) and are a great way to share about your work within ubuntu.

With that in mind, it's a perfect opportunity for you to participate in 'Show and Tell' with the rest of the community. I encourage you to propose a session on the 'Show and Tell' track. This track exists for things like demos, quick talks, and 'show and tell' type things. It's perfect to spend 5 or 10 minutes talking about something you made or work on. Or perhaps something you find interesting. Or just a way to share a little about the team you work with or a project you've done. For those of you who may have been a part of the 'lightning talks' during the days of the physical UDS, anything that would have been considered a lightning talk is more than welcome in this track.

Cool, where do I signup?
Proposing a session is simple to do, and there's even a webpage to help! If you really get stuck, feel free to contact me, Svetlana Belkin, Marco Ceppi, or Allan Lesage who are your friendly track leads for this track. Once it's proposed the session will be assigned a date and time. Myself or another track lead will follow-up with you before UOS to ensure you are ready and the date and time is suitable for you.

Is there another way to participate?
Yes! Remember to checkout the show and tell sessions and participate by asking questions and enjoying the presentations. I guarantee you will learn something new. Maybe even useful!


Thanks for helping make UOS a success. I'll see you there!


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Shuduo

日期:2015-04-14 作者:新闻更新 出处:IT.com.cn(IT世界网)

近日,Canonical与中国移动联合发起的“Ubuntu开发者创新大赛”正在各大高校如火如荼的展开,公开征集优秀适配Ubuntu操作系统的Scope、应用等作品。其中,优麒麟作为本次大赛的开发平台,为开发者提供了开放的、便捷的桌面操作系统,该系统易于开发者使用,开发者可以将更多的精力投入到创新作品的开发中。


中国移动&Ubuntu开发者创新大赛

本次赛事活动将使国内开发者接触到Ubuntu所带来的新一代移动体验。这将打破自第一款iPhone以来所形成的对于应用为王的固定模式,也将突破屏幕上惟有应用图标排列组成的单一视觉效果和使用上的局限。Ubuntu系统实现了内容和服务的前置,可直接呈现于屏幕上,从而有效的为用户创造一个丰富、快速且不碎片化的体验。而开发者只需花费相对于传统应用开发和维护而言很小的成本,便可在系统级别上创造出与应用同样的用户体验。这些独特体验是通过使用Ubuntu Scopes来完成的,它是Ubuntu独有的全新UI工具,可通过Ubuntu SDK获取。想了解更多Ubuntu Scopes和Ubuntu手机的信息,可访问Ubuntu官网。

赛事面向学生群体、职业开发者和开源社区,共设置6个奖项,奖励包括7万人民币现金和手机等奖品,并为学生组的获奖参赛者提供Canonical实习机会。报名截止时间为2015年5月15日,2015年6月进行决赛评选。开发者可访问“和你圆梦”百万青年创业就业计划官网报名参赛,

据悉,本次大赛的参赛开发者大都在使用优麒麟Ubuntu Kylin做Ubuntu手机开发的操作系统,作为一个中文化本地化的Ubuntu分支优麒麟,让国内开发者可以更轻松的使用Ubuntu手机的SDK来进行开发。

为了让国内业界开发者以及校内学生,更快更好的了解Ubuntu手机平台和开发技术,Canonical公司已在全国校内外场所举办多场落地培训互动。由知名专家高级工程师带队,为国内开发者个人团体从平台介绍到实际上手开发详尽讲解,并在现场手把手教大家如何开发Scope。同时,他们还为广大的开发者朋友准备了一定数量的优麒麟Ubuntu Kylin启动盘,内含Ubuntu SDK,以及一整套的培训教程资料,为开发者们提供了全面的技术支持。

开发者使用优麒麟平台进行Ubuntu手机应开发,可以轻松实现自己的创新想法、潮流创意等,让青年开发者率先接触到了新兴的移动生态系统,在获得崭新的创业机遇同时助力TD 产业蓬勃发展。日前,Ubuntu开发者创新大赛线上线下的技术培训活动已经在北京邮电、中科大、长沙中南大学、中山大学等高校展开。后续培训安排日程可通过关注Ubuntu微信账号(UbuntuByCanonical)获得。

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Shuduo

2015-04-14 16:48 作者:www.guigu.org HV:87 来源:硅谷网 编辑:书明寒

  近日,记者了解到国产操作系统优麒麟正式发布了15.04 Beta 2测试版本,对重量级特色软件进行了升级,更好的方便用户体验,这款适合个人应用、大型企业和政府机构办公的操作系统在细节上的创新升级,提升了其品质和服务能力,获得了用户的认可,对于国内Linux操作系统的发展也起到了很好的示范作用。

  满足中国用户的使用习惯

  优麒麟设计之初就是为了做更有中国特色的操作系统,采用平台国际化与应用本地化融合的设计理念,通过定制本地化的桌面用户环境以及开发满足广大中文用户特定需求的应用软件来提供细腻的中文用户体验。

  记者从官方了解到,相对于14.10正式版,在细节上看到了更多创新,此次发布的测试版本累计修复了60多个Bug;更新了系统主题;系统内核升级到3.19,,能支持下一代英特尔Braswell芯片;用户桌面环境的改进包括默认打开“本地集成菜单”和启动器的“单击最小化”两个特性,更利于Windows熟练用户学习使用Unity用户界面。

  同时,新版本还升级了一些特色应用,软件中心、优客助手、优客农历等,其中优客助手2.0.1版本实现了全新的用户界面和操作方式,软件中心1.3.0版本增加了用户“完善翻译”和个人应用管理等功能。另外,开发团队与搜狗公司合作开发了搜狗输入法1.2版本,该版本已修复多个重要已知Bug,并支持细胞词库功能,当有最新更新时,已安装的用户可以自动更新。

  优麒麟获得用户认可

  绝大多数的开源软件在正式发布前会发布数版测试版本,然后会通过其技术社区不断后续完善,这也是开源软件正常的开发过程。这个版本应该是15.04正式版本之前最后发布的一个测试版本,接下来优麒麟开发团队将对系统关键组件、集成应用、中文化等进行更详细的测试以及Bug修复,这将为优麒麟推向市场奠定基础。

  去年,优麒麟系统进入了中央国家机关政府采购个人操作系统协议供货商名单。入围政府采购名单,意味着这款操作系统通过了国内最高层次的全面审核和认可,这对优麒麟来说是一个很好的发展机会。据悉,目前中央政府采购中心已经在安装试用优麒麟,而诸多部委和国家机构也正在评估试用安装优麒麟中。

  记者也从身边的朋友了解到,目前在国内很多的安卓手机开发工程师其实都是在使用优麒麟做安卓的开发,例如小米,盛大。“没有最好,只有更好”,优麒麟发布最新测试版本,就是为了更好的方便用户使用和体验,目前从下载数量看优麒麟正逐渐获得市场和消费者的认可。

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David Planella

Nearly two years ago, the Ubuntu Community Donations Program was created as an extension to the donations page on ubuntu.com/download, where those individuals who download Ubuntu for free can choose to support the project financially with a voluntary contribution. In doing so, they can use a set of sliders to determine which parts of the project the amount they donate goes to (Ubuntu Desktop, Ubuntu for phone, Ubuntu for tablet, Ubuntu on public clouds, Cloud tools, Ubuntu Server with OpenStack, Community projects, Tip to Canonical).

While donations imply the trust from donors that Canonical is acting as a steward to manage their contributions, the feedback from the community back then was that the Community slider required a deeper level of attention in terms of management and transparency. With community being such an integral part of Ubuntu, and with the new opportunity to financially support new community projects, events or travel, it was just logical to ensure that the funds allocated to them were managed fairly and transparently, with public reporting every six months and a way for Ubuntu members to request funding.

Although the regular reports already provide a clear picture where the money donated for community projects is spent on, today I’d like to give an update on the bigger picture of the Community Donations Program and answer some questions community members have raised.

A successful two years

In a nutshell, we’re proud to say that the program continues to successfully achieve the goals it was set out for. Since its inception, it has given the ability to fund around 70,000 USD worth of community initiatives, conferences, travel and more. The money has always been allocated upon individual requests, the vast majority of which were accepted. Very few were declined, and when they were, we’ve always strived to provide good reasoning for the decision.

This process has given the opportunity to support a diverse set of teams and projects of the wide Ubuntu family, including flavours and sponsoring open source projects and conferences that have collaborated with Ubuntu over the years.

Program review and feedback

About two years into the Program, we felt a more thorough review was due: to assess how it has been working, to evaluate the community feedback and to decide if there are any adjustments required. Working with the Community Council on the review, we’ve also tried to address some questions from Ubuntu members that came in recently. Here is a summary of this review.

The feedback in general has been overwhelmingly positive. The Community Donations Program is not only seen as an initiative that hugely benefits the Ubuntu project, but also the figures and allocations on the reports and are a testament to this fact.

Criticism is also important to take, and when it has come, we’ve addressed it individually and updated the public policy or FAQ accordingly. Recently, it has arrived in two areas: the uncertainty in some cases where the exact cost is not known in advance (e.g. fluctuating travel costs from the date of the request until approval and booking) and the delay in actioning some of the requests. In the first case, we’ve updated the FAQ to reflect the fact that there is some flexibility allowed in the process to work with a reasonable estimate. In the second, we’ve tried to explain that while some requests are easy to approve and actioned in a matter of a few days (we review them all once a week), some others take longer due to several different factors: back and forth communication to clarify aspects of the requests, the amount of pending requests, and in some cases, the complexity of arranging the logistics. In general, we feel that it’s not unreasonable to expect sending a request at least a month in advance to what it is being planned to organize with the funds. We’re also making it clear that requests should be filled in advance as opposed to retroactively, so that community members do not end up in a difficult position should a request not be granted.

One of the questions that came in was regarding the flavour and upstream donation sliders. Originally, there were 3 community-related sliders on ubuntu.com/download: 1) Community participation in Ubuntu development, 2) Better coordination with Debian and upstreams, 3) Better support for flavours like Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu. At some point during the 14.04 release sliders 2) and 3) were removed, leaving 1) as Community projects. Overall, this didn’t change the outcome of community allocations: since its beginning, the Community Donations Programme amounts have only come from the first slider, which is what the Canonical Community team are managing. From there, money is always allocated upon request fairly, not making a difference and benefiting Ubuntu, its flavours and upstreams equally.

All that said the lack of communication regarding the removal of the slider was something that was not intended and should have been communicated with the Community Team and the Community Council. It was a mistake for which we need to apologize. For any future changes in sliders that affect the community we will make sure that the Community Council is included in communications as an important stakeholder in the process.

Questions were also raised about the reporting on the community donations during the months in 2012/2013, between the donations page going live and the announcement of the Community Donations Program. As mentioned before, the Program was born out of the want to provide a higher level of transparency for the funds assigned to community projects. Up until then (and in the same way as they do today for the rest of the donation sliders) donors were trusting Canonical to manage the allocations fairly. Public reports were made retroactively only where it made sense (i.e. to align with fiscal quarters), but not going back all the way to the time before the start of the Program.

All in all, with these small adjustments we’re proud to say we’ll continue to support community projects with donations in the same way we’ve been doing these last two years.

And most especially, we’d like to say a big ‘thank you’ to everyone who has kindly donated and to everyone who has used the funds to help shaping the future of Ubuntu. You rock!

The post The Ubuntu Community Donations Program in review appeared first on David Planella.

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bmichaelsen

Das ist alles nur geklaut und gestohlen,
nur gezogen und geraubt.
Entschuldigung, das hab ich mir erlaubt.
— die Prinzen, Alles nur geklaut

So, you might have noticed that there was no April Fools post from me this, year unlike previous years. One idea, I had was giving LibreOffice vi-key bindings — except that apparently already exists: vibreoffice. So I went looking for something else and found odpdown by Thorsten, who just started to work on LibreOffice fulltime again, and reading about it I always had the thought that it would be great to be able to run this right from your favourite editor: Vim.

And indeed: That is not hard to do. Here is a very raw video showing how to run presentations right out of vim:

Now, this is a quick hack, Linux only, requires you to have Python3 UNO-bindings installed etc. If you want to play with it: Clone the repo from github and get started. Kudos go out to Thorsten for the original odpdown on which this is piggybagging (“das ist alles nur geklaut”). So: Have fun with this — I will have to install vibreoffice now.


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