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Posts tagged with 'ubuntu-core'

abeato

Ubuntu Core (UC) is Canonical’s take in the IoT space. There are pre-built images for officially supported devices, like Raspberry Pi or Intel NUCs, but if we have something else and there is no community port, we need to create the UC image ourselves. High level instructions on how to do this are found in the official docs. The process is straightforward once we have two critical components: the kernel and the gadget snap.

Creating these snaps is not necessarily complex, but there can be bumps in the road if you are new to the task. In this post I explain how I created them for the Jetson TX1 developer kit board, and how they were used to create a UC image for said device, hoping this will provide new tricks to hackers working on ports for other devices. All the sources for the snaps and the build scripts are available in github:
https://github.com/alfonsosanchezbeato/jetson-kernel-snap
https://github.com/alfonsosanchezbeato/jetson-gadget-snap
https://github.com/alfonsosanchezbeato/jetson-ubuntu-core

So, let’s start with…

The kernel snap

The Linux kernel that we will use needs some kernel configuration options to be activated, and it is also especially important that it has a modern version of apparmor so snaps can be properly confined. The official Jetson kernel is the 4.4 release, which is quite old, but fortunately Canonical has a reference 4.4 kernel with all the needed patches for snaps backported. Knowing this, we are a git format-patch command away to obtain the patches we will use on top of the nvidia kernel. The patches include also files with the configuration options that we need for snaps, plus some changes so the snap could be successfully compiled on Ubuntu 18.04 desktop.

Once we have the sources, we need, of course, to create a snapcraft.yaml file that will describe how to build the kernel snap. We will walk through it, highlighting the parts more specific to the Jetson device.

Starting with the kernel part, it turns out that we cannot use easily the kernel plugin, due to the special way in which the kernel needs to be built: nvidia distributes part of the needed drivers as separate repositories to the one used by the main kernel tree. Therefore, I resorted to using the nil plugin so I could hand-write the commands to do the build.

The pull stage that resulted is

override-pull: |
  snapcraftctl pull
  # Get kernel sources, which are distributed across different repos
  ./source_sync.sh -k tegra-l4t-r28.2.1
  # Apply canonical patches - apparmor stuff essentially
  cd sources/kernel/display
  git am ../../../patch-display/*
  cd -
  cd sources/kernel/kernel-4.4
  git am ../../../patch/*

which runs a script to retrieve the sources (I pulled this script from nvidia Linux for Tegra -L4T- distribution) and applies Canonical patches.

The build stage is a few more lines, so I decided to use an external script to implement it. We will analyze now parts of it. For the kernel configuration we add all the necessary Ubuntu bits:

make "$JETSON_KERNEL_CONFIG" \
    snappy/containers.config \
    snappy/generic.config \
    snappy/security.config \
    snappy/snappy.config \
    snappy/systemd.config

Then, to do the build we run

make -j"$num_cpu" Image modules dtbs

An interesting catch here is that zImage files are not supported due to lack of a decompressor implementation in the arm64 kernel. So we have to build an uncompressed Image instead.

After some code that stages the built files so they are included in the snap later, we retrieve the initramfs from the core snap. This step is usually hidden from us by the kernel plugin, but this time we have to code it ourselves:

# Get initramfs from core snap, which we need to download
core_url=$(curl -s -H "X-Ubuntu-Series: 16" -H "X-Ubuntu-Architecture: arm64" \
                "https://search.apps.ubuntu.com/api/v1/snaps/details/core?channel=stable" \
               | jq -r ".anon_download_url")
curl -L "$core_url" > core.snap
# Glob so we get both link and regular file
unsquashfs core.snap "boot/initrd.img-core*"
cp squashfs-root/boot/initrd.img-core "$SNAPCRAFT_PART_INSTALL"/initrd.img
ln "$SNAPCRAFT_PART_INSTALL"/initrd.img "$SNAPCRAFT_PART_INSTALL"/initrd-"$KERNEL_RELEASE".img

Moving back to the snapcraft recipe we also have an initramfs part, which takes care of doing some changes to the default initramfs shipped by UC:

initramfs:
  after: [ kernel ]
  plugin: nil
  source: ../initramfs
  override-build: |
    find . | cpio --quiet -o -H newc | lzma >> "$SNAPCRAFT_STAGE"/initrd.img

Here we are taking advantage of the fact that the initramfs can be built as a concatenation of compressed cpio archives. When the kernel decompresses it, the files included in the later archives overwrite the files from the first ones, which allows us to modify easily files in the initramfs without having to change the one shipped with core. The change that we are doing here is a modification to the resize script that allows UC to get all the free space in the disk on first boot. The modification makes sure this happens in the case when the partition is already taken all available space but the filesystem does not. We could remove this modification when these changes reach the core snap, thing that will happen eventually.

The last part of this snap is the firmware part:

firmware:
  plugin: nil
  override-build: |
    set -xe
    wget https://developer.nvidia.com/embedded/dlc/l4t-jetson-tx1-driver-package-28-2-ga -O Tegra210_Linux_R28.2.0_aarch64.tbz2
    tar xf Tegra210_Linux_R28.2.0_aarch64.tbz2 Linux_for_Tegra/nv_tegra/nvidia_drivers.tbz2
    tar xf Linux_for_Tegra/nv_tegra/nvidia_drivers.tbz2 lib/firmware/
    cd lib; cp -r firmware/ "$SNAPCRAFT_PART_INSTALL"
    mkdir -p "$SNAPCRAFT_PART_INSTALL"/firmware/gm20b
    cd "$SNAPCRAFT_PART_INSTALL"/firmware/gm20b
    ln -sf "../tegra21x/acr_ucode.bin" "acr_ucode.bin"
    ln -sf "../tegra21x/gpmu_ucode.bin" "gpmu_ucode.bin"
    ln -sf "../tegra21x/gpmu_ucode_desc.bin" "gpmu_ucode_desc.bin"
    ln -sf "../tegra21x/gpmu_ucode_image.bin" "gpmu_ucode_image.bin"
    ln -sf "../tegra21x/gpu2cde.bin" "gpu2cde.bin"
    ln -sf "../tegra21x/NETB_img.bin" "NETB_img.bin"
    ln -sf "../tegra21x/fecs_sig.bin" "fecs_sig.bin"
    ln -sf "../tegra21x/pmu_sig.bin" "pmu_sig.bin"
    ln -sf "../tegra21x/pmu_bl.bin" "pmu_bl.bin"
    ln -sf "../tegra21x/fecs.bin" "fecs.bin"
    ln -sf "../tegra21x/gpccs.bin" "gpccs.bin"

Here we download some files so we can add firmware blobs to the snap. These files come separate from nvidia kernel sources.

So this is it for the kernel snap, now you just need to follow the instructions to get it built.

The gadget snap

Time now to take a look at the gadget snap. First, I recommend to start by reading great ogra’s post on gadget snaps for devices with u-boot bootloader before going through this section. Now, same as for the kernel one, we will go through the different parts that are defined in the snapcraft.yaml file. The first one builds the u-boot binary:

uboot:
  plugin: nil
  source: git://nv-tegra.nvidia.com/3rdparty/u-boot.git
  source-type: git
  source-tag: tegra-l4t-r28.2
  override-pull: |
    snapcraftctl pull
    # Apply UC patches + bug fixes
    git am ../../../uboot-patch/*.patch
  override-build: |
    export ARCH=arm64 CROSS_COMPILE=aarch64-linux-gnu-
    make p2371-2180_defconfig
    nice make -j$(nproc)
    cp "$SNAPCRAFT_PART_BUILD"/u-boot.bin $SNAPCRAFT_PART_INSTALL"/

We decided again to use the nil plugin as we need to do some special quirks. The sources are pulled from nvidia’s u-boot repository, but we apply some patches on top. These patches, along with the uboot environment, provide

  • Support for loading the UC kernel and initramfs from disk
  • Support for the revert functionality in case a core or kernel snap installation goes wrong
  • Bug fixes for u-boot’s ext4 subsystem – required because the just mentioned revert functionality needs to call u-boot’s command saveenv, which happened to be broken for ext4 filesystems in tegra’s u-boot

More information on the specifics of u-boot patches for UC can be found in this great blog post.

The only other part that the snap has is uboot-env:

uboot-env:
  plugin: nil
  source: uboot-env
  override-build: |
    mkenvimage -r -s 131072 -o uboot.env uboot.env.in
    cp "$SNAPCRAFT_PART_BUILD"/uboot.env "$SNAPCRAFT_PART_INSTALL"/
    # Link needed for ubuntu-image to work properly
    cd "$SNAPCRAFT_PART_INSTALL"/; ln -s uboot.env uboot.conf
  build-packages:
    - u-boot-tools

This simply encodes the uboot.env.in file into a format that is readable by u-boot. The resulting file, uboot.env, is included in the snap.

This environment is where most of the support for UC is encoded. I will not delve too much into the details, but just want to mention that the variables that need to be edited usually for new devices are

  • devnum, partition, and devtype to set the system boot partition, from which we load the kernel and initramfs
  • fdtfile, fdt_addr_r, and fdt_high to determine the name of the device tree and where in memory it should be loaded
  • ramdisk_addr_r and initrd_high to set the loading location for the initramfs
  • kernel_addr_r to set where the kernel needs to be loaded
  • args contains kernel arguments and needs to be adapted to the device specifics
  • Finally, for this device, snappy_boot was changed so it used booti instead of bootz, as we could not use a compressed kernel as explained above

Besides the snapcraft recipe, the other mandatory file when defining a gadget snap is the gadget.yaml file. This file defines, among other things, the image partitioning layout. There is more to it, but in this case, partitioning is the only thing we have defined:

volumes:
  jetson:
    bootloader: u-boot
    schema: gpt
    structure:
      - name: system-boot
        role: system-boot
        type: 0FC63DAF-8483-4772-8E79-3D69D8477DE4
        filesystem: ext4
        filesystem-label: system-boot
        offset: 17408
        size: 67108864
      - name: TBC
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 2097152
      - name: EBT
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 4194304
      - name: BPF
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 2097152
      - name: WB0
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 6291456
      - name: RP1
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 4194304
      - name: TOS
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 6291456
      - name: EKS
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 2097152
      - name: FX
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 2097152
      - name: BMP
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 134217728
      - name: SOS
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 20971520
      - name: EXI
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 67108864
      - name: LNX
        type: 0FC63DAF-8483-4772-8E79-3D69D8477DE4
        size: 67108864
        content:
          - image: u-boot.bin
      - name: DTB
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 4194304
      - name: NXT
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 2097152
      - name: MXB
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 6291456
      - name: MXP
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
        size: 6291456
      - name: USP
        type: EBD0A0A2-B9E5-4433-87C0-68B6B72699C7
size: 2097152

The Jetson TX1 has a complex partitioning layout, with many partitions being allocated for the first stage bootloader, and many others that are undocumented. So, to minimize the risk of touching a critical partition, I preferred to keep most of them untouched and do just the minor amount of changes to fit UC into the device. Therefore, the gadget.yaml volumes entry mainly describes the TX1 defaults, with the main differences comparing to the original being:

  1. The APP partition is renamed to system-boot and reduced to only 64MB. It will contain the uboot environment file plus the kernel and initramfs, as usual in UC systems with u-boot bootloader.
  2. The LNX partition will contain our u-boot binary
  3. If a partition with role: system-data is not defined explicitly (which is the case here), a partition which such role and with label “writable” is implicitly defined at the end of the volume. This will take all the available space left aside by the reduction of the APP partition, and will contain the UC root filesystem. This will replace the UDA partition that is the last in nvidia partitioning scheme.

Now, it is time to build the gadget snap by following the repository instructions.

Building & flashing the image

Now that we have the snaps, it is time to build the image. There is not much to it, you just need an Ubuntu One account and to follow the instructions to create a key to be able to sign a model assertion. With that just follow the README.md file in the jetson-ubuntu-core repository. You can also download the latest tarball from the repository if you prefer.

The build script will generate not only a full image file, but also a tarball that will contain separate files for each partition that needs to be flashed in the device. This is needed because unfortunately there is no way we can fully flash the Jetson device with a GPT image, instead we can flash only individual partitions with the tools nvidia provides.

Once the build finishes, we can take the resulting tarball and follow the instructions to get the necessary partitions flashed. As can be read there, we have to download the nvidia L4T package. Also, note that to be able to change the partition sizes and files to flash, a couple of patches have to be applied on top of the L4T scripts.

Summary

After this, you should have a working Ubuntu Core 18 device. You can use the serial port or an external monitor to configure it with your launchpad account so you can ssh into it. Enjoy!

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Dustin Kirkland

tl;dr

  • Put /tmp on tmpfs and you'll improve your Linux system's I/O, reduce your carbon foot print and electricity usage, stretch the battery life of your laptop, extend the longevity of your SSDs, and provide stronger security.
  • In fact, we should do that by default on Ubuntu servers and cloud images.
  • Having tested 502 physical and virtual servers in production at Canonical, 96.6% of them could immediately fit all of /tmp in half of the free memory available and 99.2% could fit all of /tmp in (free memory + free swap).

Try /tmp on tmpfs Yourself

$ echo "tmpfs /tmp tmpfs rw,nosuid,nodev" | sudo tee -a /etc/fstab
$ sudo reboot

Background

In April 2009, I proposed putting /tmp on tmpfs (an in memory filesystem) on Ubuntu servers by default -- under certain conditions, like, well, having enough memory. The proposal was "approved", but got hung up for various reasons.  Now, again in 2016, I proposed the same improvement to Ubuntu here in a bug, and there's a lively discussion on the ubuntu-cloud and ubuntu-devel mailing lists.

The benefits of /tmp on tmpfs are:
  • Performance: reads, writes, and seeks are insanely fast in a tmpfs; as fast as accessing RAM
  • Security: data leaks to disk are prevented (especially when swap is disabled), and since /tmp is its own mount point, we should add the nosuid and nodev options (and motivated sysadmins could add noexec, if they desire).
  • Energy efficiency: disk wake-ups are avoided
  • Reliability: fewer NAND writes to SSD disks
In the interest of transparency, I'll summarize the downsides:
  • There's sometimes less space available in memory, than in your root filesystem where /tmp may traditionally reside
  • Writing to tmpfs could evict other information from memory to make space
You can learn more about Linux tmpfs here.

Not Exactly Uncharted Territory...

Fedora proposed and implemented this in Fedora 18 a few years ago, citing that Solaris has been doing this since 1994. I just installed Fedora 23 into a VM and confirmed that /tmp is a tmpfs in the default installation, and ArchLinux does the same. Debian debated doing so, in this thread, which starts with all the reasons not to put /tmp on a tmpfs; do make sure you read the whole thread, though, and digest both the pros and cons, as both are represented throughout the thread.

Full Data Treatment

In the current thread on ubuntu-cloud and ubuntu-devel, I was asked for some "real data"...

In fact, across the many debates for and against this feature in Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, ArchLinux, and others, there is plenty of supposition, conjecture, guesswork, and presumption.  But seeing as we're talking about data, let's look at some real data!

Here's an analysis of a (non-exhaustive) set of 502 of Canonical's production servers that run Ubuntu.com, Launchpad.net, and hundreds of related services, including OpenStack, dozens of websites, code hosting, databases, and more. These servers sampled are slightly biased with more physical machines than virtual machines, but both are present in the survey, and a wide variety of uptime is represented, from less than a day of uptime, to 1306 days of uptime (with live patched kernels, of course).  Note that this is not an exhaustive survey of all servers at Canonical.

I humbly invite further study and analysis of the raw, tab-separated data, which you can find at:
The column headers are:
  • Column 1: The host names have been anonymized to sequential index numbers
  • Column 2: `du -s /tmp` disk usage of /tmp as of 2016-01-17 (ie, this is one snapshot in time)
  • Column 3-8: The output of the `free` command, memory in KB for each server
  • Column 9-11: The output of the `free` command, sway in KB for each server
  • Column 12: The number of inodes in /tmp
I have imported it into a Google Spreadsheet to do some data treatment. You're welcome to do the same, or use the spreadsheet of your choice.

For the numbers below, 1 MB = 1000 KB, and 1 GB = 1000 MB, per Wikipedia. (Let's argue MB and MiB elsewhere, shall we?)  The mean is the arithmetic average.  The median is the middle value in a sorted list of numbers.  The mode is the number that occurs most often.  If you're confused, this article might help.  All calculations are accurate to at least 2 significant digits.

Statistical summary of /tmp usage:

  • Max: 101 GB
  • Min: 4.0 KB
  • Mean: 453 MB
  • Median: 16 KB
  • Mode: 4.0 KB
Looking at all 502 servers, there are two extreme outliers in terms of /tmp usage. One server has 101 GB of data in /tmp, and the other has 42 GB. The latter is a very noisy django.log. There are 4 more severs using between 10 GB and 12 GB of /tmp. The remaining 496 severs surveyed (98.8%) are using less than 4.8 GB of /tmp. In fact, 483 of the servers surveyed (96.2%) use less than 1 GB of /tmp. 454 of the servers surveyed (90.4%) use less than 100 MB of /tmp. 414 of the servers surveyed (82.5%) use less than 10 MB of /tmp. And actually, 370 of the servers surveyed (73.7%) -- the overwhelming majority -- use less than 1MB of /tmp.

Statistical summary of total memory available:

  • Max: 255 GB
  • Min: 1.0 GB
  • Mean: 24 GB
  • Median: 10.2 GB
  • Mode: 4.1 GB
All of the machines surveyed (100%) have at least 1 GB of RAM.  495 of the machines surveyed (98.6%) have at least 2GB of RAM.   437 of the machines surveyed (87%) have at least 4 GB of RAM.   255 of the machines surveyed (50.8%) have at least 10GB of RAM.    157 of the machines surveyed (31.3%) have more than 24 GB of RAM.  74 of the machines surveyed (14.7%) have at least 64 GB of RAM.

Statistical summary of total swap available:

  • Max: 201 GB
  • Min: 0.0 KB
  • Mean: 13 GB
  • Median: 6.3 GB
  • Mode: 2.96 GB
485 of the machines surveyed (96.6%) have at least some swap enabled, while 17 of the machines surveyed (3.4%) have zero swap configured. One of these swap-less machines is using 415 MB of /tmp; that machine happens to have 32 GB of RAM. All of the rest of the swap-less machines are using between 4 KB and 52 KB (inconsequential) /tmp, and have between 2 GB and 28 GB of RAM.  5 machines (1.0%) have over 100 GB of swap space.

Statistical summary of swap usage:

  • Max: 19 GB
  • Min: 0.0 KB
  • Mean: 657 MB
  • Median: 18 MB
  • Mode: 0.0 KB
476 of the machines surveyed (94.8%) are using less than 4 GB of swap. 463 of the machines surveyed (92.2%) are using less than 1 GB of swap. And 366 of the machines surveyed (72.9%) are using less than 100 MB of swap.  There are 18 "swappy" machines (3.6%), using 10 GB or more swap.

Modeling /tmp on tmpfs usage

Next, I took the total memory (RAM) in each machine, and divided it in half which is the default allocation to /tmp on tmpfs, and subtracted the total /tmp usage on each system, to determine "if" all of that system's /tmp could actually fit into its tmpfs using free memory alone (ie, without swap or without evicting anything from memory).

485 of the machines surveyed (96.6%) could store all of their /tmp in a tmpfs, in free memory alone -- i.e. without evicting anything from cache.

Now, if we take each machine, and sum each system's "Free memory" and "Free swap", and check its /tmp usage, we'll see that 498 of the systems surveyed (99.2%) could store the entire contents of /tmp in tmpfs free memory + swap available. The remaining 4 are our extreme outliers identified earlier, with /tmp usages of [101 GB, 42 GB, 13 GB, 10 GB].

Performance of tmpfs versus ext4-on-SSD

Finally, let's look at some raw (albeit rough) read and write performance numbers, using a simple dd model.

My /tmp is on a tmpfs:
kirkland@x250:/tmp⟫ df -h .
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
tmpfs 7.7G 2.6M 7.7G 1% /tmp

Let's write 2 GB of data:
kirkland@x250:/tmp⟫ dd if=/dev/zero of=/tmp/zero bs=2G count=1
0+1 records in
0+1 records out
2147479552 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 1.56469 s, 1.4 GB/s

And let's write it completely synchronously:
kirkland@x250:/tmp⟫ dd if=/dev/zero of=./zero bs=2G count=1 oflag=dsync
0+1 records in
0+1 records out
2147479552 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 2.47235 s, 869 MB/s

Let's try the same thing to my Intel SSD:
kirkland@x250:/local⟫ df -h .
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/dm-0 217G 106G 100G 52% /

And write 2 GB of data:
kirkland@x250:/local⟫ dd if=/dev/zero of=./zero bs=2G count=1
0+1 records in
0+1 records out
2147479552 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 7.52918 s, 285 MB/s

And let's redo it completely synchronously:
kirkland@x250:/local⟫ dd if=/dev/zero of=./zero bs=2G count=1 oflag=dsync
0+1 records in
0+1 records out
2147479552 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 11.9599 s, 180 MB/s

Let's go back and read the tmpfs data:
kirkland@x250:~⟫ dd if=/tmp/zero of=/dev/null bs=2G count=1
0+1 records in
0+1 records out
2147479552 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 1.94799 s, 1.1 GB/s

And let's read the SSD data:
kirkland@x250:~⟫ dd if=/local/zero of=/dev/null bs=2G count=1
0+1 records in
0+1 records out
2147479552 bytes (2.1 GB) copied, 2.55302 s, 841 MB/s

Now, let's create 10,000 small files (1 KB) in tmpfs:
kirkland@x250:/tmp/foo⟫ time for i in $(seq 1 10000); do dd if=/dev/zero of=$i bs=1K count=1 oflag=dsync ; done
real 0m15.518s
user 0m1.592s
sys 0m7.596s

And let's do the same on the SSD:
kirkland@x250:/local/foo⟫ time for i in $(seq 1 10000); do dd if=/dev/zero of=$i bs=1K count=1 oflag=dsync ; done
real 0m26.713s
user 0m2.928s
sys 0m7.540s

For better or worse, I don't have any spinning disks, so I couldn't repeat the tests there.

So on these rudimentary read/write tests via dd, I got 869 MB/s - 1.4 GB/s write to tmpfs and 1.1 GB/s read from tmps, and 180 MB/s - 285 MB/s write to SSD and 841 MB/s read from SSD.

Surely there are more scientific ways of measuring I/O to tmpfs and physical storage, but I'm confident that, by any measure, you'll find tmpfs extremely fast when tested against even the fastest disks and filesystems.

Summary

  • /tmp usage
    • 98.8% of the servers surveyed use less than 4.8 GB of /tmp
    • 96.2% use less than 1.0 GB of /tmp
    • 73.7% use less than 1.0 MB of /tmp
    • The mean/median/mode are [453 MB / 16 KB / 4 KB]
  • Total memory available
    • 98.6% of the servers surveyed have at least 2.0 GB of RAM
    • 88.0% have least 4.0 GB of RAM
    • 57.4% have at least 8.0 GB of RAM
    • The mean/median/mode are [24 GB / 10 GB / 4 GB]
  • Swap available
    • 96.6% of the servers surveyed have some swap space available
    • The mean/median/mode are [13 GB / 6.3 GB / 3 GB]
  • Swap used
    • 94.8% of the servers surveyed are using less than 4 GB of swap
    • 92.2% are using less than 1 GB of swap
    • 72.9% are using less than 100 MB of swap
    • The mean/median/mode are [657 MB / 18 MB / 0 KB]
  • Modeling /tmp on tmpfs
    • 96.6% of the machines surveyed could store all of the data they currently have stored in /tmp, in free memory alone, without evicting anything from cache
    • 99.2% of the machines surveyed could store all of the data they currently have stored in /tmp in free memory + free swap
    • 4 of the 502 machines surveyed (0.8%) would need special handling, reconfiguration, or more swap

Conclusion


  • Can /tmp be mounted as a tmpfs always, everywhere?
    • No, we did identify a few systems (4 out of 502 surveyed, 0.8% of total) consuming inordinately large amounts of data in /tmp (101 GB, 42 GB), and with insufficient available memory and/or swap.
    • But those were very much the exception, not the rule.  In fact, 96.6% of the systems surveyed could fit all of /tmp in half of the freely available memory in the system.
  • Is this the first time anyone has suggested or tried this as a Linux/UNIX system default?
    • Not even remotely.  Solaris has used tmpfs for /tmp for 22 years, and Fedora and ArchLinux for at least the last 4 years.
  • Is tmpfs really that much faster, more efficient, more secure?
    • Damn skippy.  Try it yourself!
:-Dustin

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Dustin Kirkland


With the recent introduction of Snappy Ubuntu, there are now several different ways to extend and update (apt-get vs. snappy) multiple flavors of Ubuntu (Core, Desktop, and Server).

We've put together this matrix with a few examples of where we think Traditional Ubuntu (apt-get) and Transactional Ubuntu (snappy) might make sense in your environment.  Note that this is, of course, not a comprehensive list.

Ubuntu Core
Ubuntu Desktop
Ubuntu Server
Traditional apt-get
Minimal Docker and LXC imagesDesktop, Laptop, Personal WorkstationsBaremetal, MAAS, OpenStack, General Purpose Cloud Images
Transactional snappy
Minimal IoT Devices and Micro-Services Architecture Cloud ImagesTouch, Phones, TabletsComfy, Human Developer Interaction (over SSH) in an atomically updated environment

I've presupposed a few of the questions you might ask, while you're digesting this new landscape...

Q: I'm looking for the smallest possible Ubuntu image that still supports apt-get...
A: You want our Traditional Ubuntu Core. This is often useful in building Docker and LXC containers.

Q: I'm building the next wearable IoT device/drone/robot, and perhaps deploying a fleet of atomically updated micro-services to the cloud...
A: You want Snappy Ubuntu Core.

Q: I want to install the best damn Linux on my laptop, desktop, or personal workstation, with industry best security practices, 30K+ freely available open source packages, freely available, with extensive support for hardware devices and proprietary add-ons...
A: You want the same Ubuntu Desktop that we've been shipping for 10+ years, on time, every time ;-)

Q: I want that same converged, tasteful Ubuntu experience on your personal, smart devices like my Phones and Tablets...
A: You want Ubuntu Touch, which is a very graphical human interface focused expression of Snappy Ubuntu.

Q: I'm deploying Linux onto bare metal servers at scale in the data center, perhaps building IaaS clouds using OpenStack or PaaS cloud using CloudFoundry? And I'm launching general purpose Linux server instances in public clouds (like AWS, Azure, or GCE) and private clouds...
A: You want the traditional apt-get Ubuntu Server.

Q: I'm developing and debugging applications, services, or frameworks for Snappy Ubuntu devices or cloud instances?
A: You want Comfy Ubuntu Server, which is a command line human interface extension of Snappy Ubuntu, with a number of conveniences and amenities (ssh, byobu, manpages, editors, etc.) that won't be typically included in the minimal Snappy Ubuntu Core build. [*Note that the Comfy images will be available very soon]

Cheers,
:-Dustin

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