Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'ubuntu core'

ssweeny

My team at work has been focused on snaps this year and one thing we’ve tried to do internally is establish a set of best practices for snap packaging software. Toward that end I’ve been working on a little tool I’m calling snaplint to encode those practices and verify that we’re following them.

Right now you can run snaplint against your snapcraft project directory
and it will scan the prime subdirectory for the following things:

  • copyright (basically that you included usr/share/doc/*copyright*) for
    any stage-packages
  • developer cruft (things like header and object files or static libs
    that might have made their way into your snap)
  • libraries (examine the ELF files in your snap and look for libraries
    which aren’t used)

The next things I’m planning on adding are:

  • checking for copyright info from apps/parts themselves.
  • checking for mixing of incompatible licenses

I would love to hear suggestions on further improvements.

You can find the source at https://github.com/ssweeny/snaplint

And, of course if you’re running Ubuntu 16.04 or later you can try it on your own machine with:
$ snap install snaplint
$ snaplint path/to/your/project

Read more
Daniel Holbach

Ubuntu 16.04 is out!

Ubuntu 16.04 – yet another LTS?

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, aka the Xenial Xerus, has just been released. It’s incredible that it’s already the 24th Ubuntu release and the 6th LTS release. If you have been around for a while and need a blast from the past, check out this video:

Click here to view it on youtube. It’s available in /usr/share/example-content on a default desktop install as well.

You would think that after such a long time releases get somewhat inflationary and less important and while I’d very likely always say on release day “yes, this one is the best of all so far”, Ubuntu 16.04 is indeed very special to me.

Snappy snappy snappy

Among the many pieces of goodness to come to your way is the snapd package. It’s installed by default on many flavours of Ubuntu including Ubuntu Desktop and is your snappy connection to myApps.

Snappy Ubuntu Core 2.0 landing just in time for the 16.04 LTS release only happened due to the great and very hard work of many teams and individuals. I also see it as the implementation of lots of feedback we have been getting from third party app developers, ISVs and upstream projects over the years. Basically what all of them wanted was in a nutshell: a solid Ubuntu base, flexibility in handling their app and the relevant stack, independence from distro freezes, dead-simple packaging, bullet-proof upgrades and rollbacks, and an app store model established with the rise of the smartphones. Snappy Ubuntu Core is exactly that and more. What it also brings to Ubuntu is a clear isolation between apps and a universal trust model.

As most of you know, I’ve been trying to teach people how to do packaging for Ubuntu for years and it continued to improve and get easier, but all in all, it still is hard to get right. snapcraft makes this so much easier. It’s just beautiful. If you have been doing some packaging in the past, just take a look at some of the examples.

Landing a well-working and stable snapd with clear-cut and stable set of APIs was the most important aspect, especially considering that almost everyone will be basing their work on 16.04 LTS, which is going to be supported for five years. This includes being able to use snapcraft on the LTS.

Today you can build a snap, upload it to the store using snapcraft upload, having it automatically reviewed and published by the store and Desktop users can install it on their system. This brings you in a position where you can easily share your software with millions of users, without having to wait for somebody to upload it to the distro for you, without having your users add yet another PPA, etc.

So, what’s still missing? Quite a few things actually. Because you have to bundle your dependencies, packages are still quite big. This will change as soon as the specifics of OS and library snaps are figured out. Apart from that many new interfaces will need to be added to make Ubuntu Core really useful and versatile. There are also still a few bugs which need figuring out.

If you generally like what you’re reading here, come and talk to us. Introduce yourselves, talk to us and we’ll figure out if anything you need it still missing.

If you’re curious you can also check out some blog posts written by people who worked on this relentlessly in the last weeks:

Thanks a lot everyone – I thoroughly enjoyed working with you on this and I’m looking forward to all the great things we are going to deliver together!

Bring your friends, bring your questions!

The Community team moved the weekly Ubuntu Community Q&A to be tomorrow, Friday 2016-04-22 15:00 UTC on https://ubuntuonair.com as usual. If you have questions, tune in and bring your friends as well!

Read more
Daniel Holbach

ubucon

I’m very excited about UbuCon Summit which will bring many many Ubuntu people from all parts of its community together in January. David Planella did a great job explaining why this event is going to be just fantastic.

I look forward to meeting everyone and particularly look forward to what we’ve got to show in terms of Snappy Ubuntu Core.

Manik Taneja and Sergio Schvezov

We are going to have Manik Taneja and Sergio Schvezov there who are going to give the following talk:

Internet of Things gets ‘snappy’ with Ubuntu Core

Snappy Ubuntu Core is the new rendition of Ubuntu, designed from the ground up to power the next generation of IoT devices. The same Ubuntu and its vast ecosystem, but delivered in a leaner form, with state-of-the art security and reliable update mechanisms to ensure devices and apps are always up-to-date.

This talk will introduce Ubuntu Core, the technologies of its foundations and the developer experience with Snapcraft. We will also discuss how public and branded stores can kickstart a thriving app ecosystem and how Ubuntu meets the needs of connected device manufacturers, entrepreneurs and innovators.

And there’s more! Sergio Schvezov will also give the following workshop:

Hands-on demo: creating Ubuntu snaps with Snapcraft

Overview the snapcraft features and demo how easily a snap can be created using multiple parts from different sources. We will also show how to create a plugin for unhandled source types.

In addition to that we are going to have a few nice things at our booth, so we can show give you a Snappy experience there as well.

If you want to find out more, like check the entire schedule or register for the event, do it at ubucon.org.

I’m looking forward to seeing you there! </p>
            <a href=Read more

Daniel Holbach

Ubuntu Online Summit featured more than 70 sessions this time around and quite a big turnout. You can find the full schedule with links to session videos and session notes in summit.ubuntu.com.

Here’s a quick summary of what happened in Snappy Ubuntu Core land:

  • Testing Snappy: In this Show & Tell session Leo Arias showcased a lot of the QA work which has been done on Ubuntu Core along with many useful techniques to run tests and easily bring up Snappy in a number of different scenario.
  • Creating more Snappy frameworks: Frameworks are an effective way to bring functionality to Ubuntu Core which can then be shared by apps. The session attracted quite a few users of Snappy who wanted to know if their use-case could be addressed by a framework. We discussed some more technical difficulties, possible solutions and learned that bluetooth and connectivity (based on network-manager) frameworks are in the works.
  • Snappy Clinic: bringing ROS apps to Snappy Ubuntu Core: Ted Gould showed off the great work which has been put into the catkin plugin of Snapcraft. Taking a simple ROS app and bringing it to Ubuntu Core is very easy. The interest from members of the ROS community was great to see and their feedback will help us improve the support even further.
  • Snap packages for phone and desktop apps: Alejandro Cura and Kyle Fazzari brought up their analysis of snappy on the phone/desktop and discussed a plan on what would need to land to make snappy apps on the Ubuntu desktop and phone a reality.
  • Your feedback counts: the Snappy onboarding experience: This session brought together a number of different users of Snappy who shared their experience and what they would like to do. The feedback was great and will be factored into our upcoming documentation plans.
  • Snappy Developer Community Resources: In this session Thibaut Rouffineau and I had a chat about our online support options and community resources. We gathered a number of ideas and will look into creating workshop and presentation materials this cycle as well.
  • Porting popular apps/software to Snappy: Many interesting apps and appliances exist for a variety of boards, most notably the Raspberry Pi. We put together a plan on how we could start a community initiative for bringing them over to Snappy Ubuntu Core.

Thanks to everyone who participated and helped to make this such a great UOS!

Read more