Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'tech'

bigjools

While setting up my new NUCs to use with MAAS as a development deployment tool, I got very, very frustrated with the initial experience so I thought I’d write up some key things here so that others may benefit — especially if you are using MAAS.

First hurdle — when you hit ctrl-P at the boot screen it is likely to not work. This is because you need to disable the num lock.

Second hurdle — when you go and enable the AMT features it asks for a new password, but doesn’t tell you that it needs to contain upper case, lower case, numbers AND punctuation.

Third hurdle — if you want to use it headless like me, it’s a good idea to enable the VNC server.  You can do that with this script:

AMT_PASSWORD=<fill me in>
VNC_PASSWORD=<fill me in>
IP=N.N.N.N
wsman put http://intel.com/wbem/wscim/1/ips-schema/1/IPS_KVMRedirectionSettingData -h ${IP} -P 16992 -u admin -p ${AMT_PASSWORD} -k RFBPassword=${VNC_PASSWORD} &&\
wsman put http://intel.com/wbem/wscim/1/ips-schema/1/IPS_KVMRedirectionSettingData -h ${IP} -P 16992 -u admin -p ${AMT_PASSWORD} -k Is5900PortEnabled=true &&\
wsman put http://intel.com/wbem/wscim/1/ips-schema/1/IPS_KVMRedirectionSettingData -h ${IP} -P 16992 -u admin -p ${AMT_PASSWORD} -k OptInPolicy=false &&\
wsman put http://intel.com/wbem/wscim/1/ips-schema/1/IPS_KVMRedirectionSettingData -h ${IP} -P 16992 -u admin -p ${AMT_PASSWORD} -k SessionTimeout=0 &&\
wsman invoke -a RequestStateChange http://schemas.dmtf.org/wbem/wscim/1/cim-schema/2/CIM_KVMRedirectionSAP -h ${IP} -P 16992 -u admin -p ${AMT_PASSWORD} -k RequestedState=2

(wsman comes from the wsmancli package)

But there is yet another gotcha!  The VNC_PASSWORD must be no more than 8 characters and still meet the same requirements as the AMT password.

Once this is all done you should be all set to use this very fast machine with MAAS.


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At UDS last week there was another "Testing in Ubuntu" session. During the event I gave a brief presentation on monitoring and testability. The thesis was that there are a lot of parallels between monitoring and testing, so many that it's worth thinking of monitoring as a type of testing at times. Due to that great monitoring requires a testable system, as well as thinking about monitoring right at the start to build a monitorable system as well as a testable one.

You can watch a video of the talk here. (Thanks to the video team for recording it and getting it online quickly.)

I have two main questions. Firstly, what are the conventional names for the "passive" and "active" monitoring that I describe? Seecondly, do you agree with me about monitoring?

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rvr

Fernando Tricas always has interesting things to say. In a recent post he talks about The life of links and digital content (Spanish):

«We tend to assume that digital [content] is forever. But anyone who accumulates enough information also knows that sometimes its difficult to find it, in other cases it breaks and, of course, there is a non-zero probability that things go wrong when hosted by third-party services. It is an old topic here, remember Will we have all this information in the future? . The topic resurfaces as news in the light of Currently charged by the article that can be read at A Year After the Egyptian Revolution, 10% of Its Social Media Documentation Is Already Gone».

In the comments, Anónima said: «Given a time t and an interval ?t, the larger ?t, the more likely is that all information in a time t-?t you want to find is gone». This sounded like an statement to check, Thus, I decided to do an experiment with del.icio.us' bookmarks.

In delicious.com/rvr I have archived around 4000 links from 2004. So, I downloaded the backup file, an HTML file with all links and metadata (date, title, tags). I developed a python script to process this file: go through the links and save its current status (whether the link is alive or not). With another script, the status were processed to generate the statistics. These are the results:

Captura de pantalla 2012-04-12 a la(s) 01.02.39

As can be seen, there is a correlation between the age of the links and the probability of being dead. For the 10% who cited the Egyptian revolution, in the case of my delicious, we must go back three years ago (2009). But at 6 years from now, a quarter of the links are now defunct. Of course, the sample is very small shouldn't be representative. It would be interesting to compare it with other accounts and to extend the time span: How many links are still alive after 10 or 15 years? Is it the same with information stored in other media? Are all this death links resting in peace in a forgotten Google's cache disk?

I imagine that sometime in the future, librarians will begin to worry not only to digitize remote past documents, but also to preserve those of the present.

In case you are interested, the code to generate such data is available at github.com/vrruiz/delicious-death-links. The spreadsheet is also available in Google Docs .

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mitechie

Since joining the Launchpad team my email has been flooded. I’ve always been pretty careful to keep my email clean and I’ve been a bit overwhelmed with all the new mailing lists. There are a bunch of people working on things, as you can imagine. So the email never stops. I’m still working on figuring out what I need to know, what I can ignore, and what should be filed away for later.

Another thing I’m finding is that I’ve got emails in both of my accounts around a single topic. For instance, I have to do some traveling. I’ve got emails on both my Gmail (personal) and Canonical (work) accounts that I really want to keep together in a single travel bucket.

I currently have offlineimap pull both of work and personal accounts down into a single folder on my machine ~/.email/. So I’ve got a ~/.email/work and a ~/.email/personal. I use mutt then to open the root there and to work through email. It works pretty well. Since I really wanted a global "travel" folder, I figured I’d just created one. So that works. I end up with a directory structure like:

  • personal
  • travel
  • work

The problem

Of course the issue here is that when offlineimap runs again it sees the email is no longer in the personal or work accounts and removes them from the server. And the travel folder isn’t a part of any server side account so it’s not backed up or synced anywhere. This means Gmail no longer sees things, my phone no longer sees them, and I’ve got no backups. Oops!

Solution start

So to fix that, my new directory structure needs to become an account. So I setup dovecot on my colo server. This way I could have an imap account that I could do whatever with. To get my email into there, I setup offlineimap on my colo to pull personal and work down as I had on my laptop. So I still have things in a ~/.email that’s from the accounts and then dovecot is keeping all of my email in ~/email (not a hidden dir). To get my email into there, I symlinked the ~/.email/personal/INBOX to ~/email/personal and did the same with the work account. Now the two accounts are just extra folders in my dovecot setup.

So there we go, colo is pulling my email, and I changed my laptop to offlineimap sync with the new dovecot server. In this way, I’ve got a single combined email account on my laptop using mutt. I then also setup my phone with an imap client to talk directly to the dovecot server. Sweet, this is getting closer to what I really want.

Issues start, who am I

Of course, once this started working I realized I had to find a way to make sure I sent email as the right person. I’d previously just told mutt if I was in the personal account to use that address and if in the work account use that one. Fortunately, we can help make mutt a bit more intelligent about things.

First, we want to have mutt check the To/CC headers to determine who this email was to, if it was me, then use that address as a From during replies.

mutt config:

# I have to set these defaults because when you first startup mutt
# it's not running folder hooks. It just starts in a folder
set from="rharding@mitechie.com"
# Reply with the address used in the TO/CC header
set reverse_name=yes
alternates "rick.stuff@canonical.com|deuce868@gmail.com"

This is a start, but it fails when sending new email. It’s not sure who I should be still. So I want a way to manually switch who the active From use is. These macros give me the ability to swap using the keybindings Alt-1 and Alt-2.

mutt config:

macro index,pager \e1 ":set from=rharding@mitechie.com\n:set status_format=\"-%r-rharding@mitechie.com: %f [Msgs:%?M?%M/?%m%?n? New:%n?%?o? Old:%o?%?d? Del:%d?%?F? Flag:%F?%?t? Tag:%t?%?p? Post:%p?%?b? Inc:%b?%?l? %l?]---(%s/%S)-%>-(%P)---\"\n" "Switch to rharding@mitechie.com"
macro index,pager \e2 ":set from=rick.stuff@canonical.com\n:set status_format=\"-%r-rick.stuff@canonical.com: %f [Msgs:%?M?%M/?%m%?n? New:%n?%?o? Old:%o?%?d? Del:%d?%?F? Flag:%F?%?t? Tag:%t?%?p? Post:%p?%?b? Inc:%b?%?l? %l?]---(%s/%S)-%>-(%P)---\"\n" "Switch to rick.stuff@canonical.com"

That’s kind of cool, and it shows in the top of my window who I am set to. Hmm, even that fails if I’ve started an email and want to switch who I am on the fly. There is a way to change that though, so another macro to the rescue, this time for the compose ui in mutt.

mutt config:

macro compose \e1 "<esc>f ^U Rick Harding <rharding@mitechie.com>\n"
macro compose \e2 "<esc>f ^U Rick Harding <rick.stuff@canonical.com>\n"

There, now even if I’m in the middle of creating an email I can switch who it’s sent as. It’s not perfect, and I know I’ll screw up at some point, but hopefully this is close enough.

Firming up with folder hooks

Finally, if I know the folder I’m in is ONLY for one account or the other, I can use folder hooks to fix that up for me.

mutt config:

folder-hook +personal.* set from="rharding@mitechie.com"
folder-hook +personal.* set signature=$HOME/.mutt/signature-mitechie
folder-hook +personal.* set query_command='"goobook query \'%s\'"'

So there, if I’m in my personal account, set the from, the signature, and change mutt to complete my addresses from goobook instead of the ldap completion I use for work addresses.

Not all roses

There are still a few issues. I lose webmail. After all, mail goes into my Gmail Inbox and then from there into various folders of my dovecot server. Honestly though, I don’t think this will be an issue. I tend to use my phone more and more for email management so as long as that works, I can get at things.

I also lose Gmail search for a large portion of my email. Again, it’s not killer. On my laptop I’ve been using notmuch (Xapian backed) for fulltext search and it’s been doing a pretty good job for me. However, I can’t run that on my phone. So searching for mail on there is going to get harder. Hopefully having a decent folder structure will help though.

I’ve also noticed that the K-9 mail client is a bit flaky with syncing changes up on things. Gmail, mutt, and I’ve also setup Thunderbird all seem to sync up ok without issue, so I think this is K-9 specific.

That brings up the issue of creating new folders. Offlineimap won’t pick up new folders I create from within mutt. It won’t push those up as new imap folders for some reason. I have to first create them using thunderbird, which sets up the folder server side for me. Then everything works ok. It’s a PITA, but hopefully I can find a better way to do this. Maybe even a Python script to hook into a mutt macro or something.

Wrap Up

So there we are. Next up is to setup imapfilter to help me pre-filter the email as it comes in. Now that all email is in one place that should be nice and easy. I can run that on my colo server and it’ll be quick.

This is obviously more trouble than most people want to go through to setup email, but hey, maybe someone will find this interesting or have some of their own ideas to share.


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Today is the first day of the Linaro Connect in Cambridge. Linaro has gathered to spend a week talking, coding and having fun.

The Infrastructure team is spending most of the week coding, on a few select topics, chosen to make good use of the time that we have together.

In order to help us focus on our goals for the week I've put together a hard copy version of status.linaro.org.

/images/connect-progress-start.jpg

We'll be updating it during the week as we make progress. I'll report back on how it looks at the end of the week.

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rvr

Summary

  • Brief analysis of 150,000 photographs from Flickr in the province of Malaga.
  • It identifies the profile and preferences of tourists.

Last Saturday, I  was in Malaga. I was invited by Sonia Blanco and the Universidad Internacional de Andalucia to participate in workshop on Tourism and Social Networks. Sonia is professor at the University of Malaga, and one of the oldest bloggers in the Spanish blogosphere. Sonia asked me to present the analysis Fernando Tricas and myself did about Flickr photos and the Canary Islands (2009-2010), and I gladly accepted. I wanted to bring an update, so we got to work to make a short presentation with data from the province of Malaga. And that's what is shown below.

Video

Last Thursday, with the presentation already made, Fernando passed me an interesting link, a visualization by the Wall Street Journal that shows the density of a week of Foursquare check-ins in New York . If the WSJ could do it, so do we ;)  We already had the data and the map algorithms, so generated the maps by months and joined them to build the animation.

The video below shows the density of photographs taken in the province of Malaga from 2004 to 2010. Blue colors are areas where they make some pictures, and the red areas have made many pictures. There are areas with many photographs, places of touristic interest. And of course, there are months where the activity is higher and lower. 

Data

The video is just a bit of whole presented analysis. Full version is available below.

As you may know, Flickr is a popular photo-sharing service with 5 billion of hosted images and 86 million unique visitors. Flickr has social networking features, since it allows to make contacts. Flickr can play a role in the promotion of tourist destinations, as it is one of the main sources of images on the Internet. But to us, Flickr is a huge source of data: Which are the most photogenic places? Who are taking pictures there? These and other questions can answered using data mining.

For this study we obtained the metadata of 175,000 photographs (62,000 geolocated), 7,900 photographers and 1,470,000 tags (47,000 unique). All these pictures were either marked by the tag "malaga" or GPS coordinates were inside the province of Malaga.

Analysis

Below are the five most relevant slides: the tag cloud, the number of photos and photographers by months, the top 10 countries of the geolocated photographers, the group of tags and heatmaps of the geolocated images.

  • Turismo-malaga-11
  • Turismo-malaga-17
  • Turismo-malaga-13
  • Turismo-malaga-15
  • Turismo-malaga-20
  • Turismo-malaga-20
Turismo-malaga-20

According to those who share photos on Flickr about Malaga, we can conclude that:

  • The high season in Málaga is August (also, in April there is a Holy Week-effect.
  • Users come mainly from UK, USA, Italy, Germany, Madrid and Andalusia. (USA is probably overrepresented compared to real visitors).
  • They are interested in photography, beaches, festivals, fairs, nature, sea, birds, sky, parks.
  • Pictures are taken mainly in Málaga (capital), Ronda, Barcenilla and Benalmadena.

The full presentation slides show more features, such as geolocated photographs by countries. It is interesting to compare these data with the previous study on the Canaries. A more detailed analysis can be done, but the roundtable had limited time. This sneak peek shows the potential of social networking and geolocation services for market research. If you have any questions, ask in the comments!

The presentation and images have a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike license.

Finally, my gratitude to the organization of the UNIA for the invitation and hospitality, to Daniel Cerdan for suggesting the title of the post and Fernando Tricas for his unconditional support.

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If you are an application developer and you want to distribute your new application for a linux distribution, then you currently have several hurdles in your path. Beyond picking which one to start with, you either have a learn a packaging format well enough that you can do the work yourself, or find someone that can do it for you.

At the early stages though neither of these options is particularly compelling. You don't want to learn a packaging format, as there is lots of code to write, and that's what you want to focus on. Finding someone to do the work for you would be great, but there are far more applications than skilled packagers, and convincing someone to help you with something larval is tough: there are going to be a lot of updates, with plenty of churn, to stay on top of, and it may be too early for them to tell if the application will be any good.

This is where pkgme comes in. This is a tool that can take care of the packaging for you, so that you can focus on writing the code, and skilled packagers can focus on packages that need high-quality packaging as they will have lots of users.

This isn't a new idea, and there are plenty of tools out there to generate the packaging for e.g. a Python application. I don't think it is a particularly good use of developer time to produce tools like that for every language/project type out there.

Instead, a few of us created pkgme. This is a tool in two parts. The first part knows about packaging, and how to create the necessary files to build a working package, but it doesn't know anything about your application. This knowledge is delegated to a backend, which doesn't need to understand packaging, and just needs to be able to tell pkgme certain facts about the application.

pkgme is now at a stage where we would like to work with people to develop backends for whatever application type you would like (Python/ Ruby On Rails/GNOME/KDE/CMake/Autotools/Vala etc.) You don't have to be an expert on packaging, or indeed on the project type you want to work on. All it takes is writing a few scripts (in whatever language makes sense), which can introspect an application and report things such as the name, version, dependencies, etc.

If this sounds like something that you would like to do then please take a look at the documentation, write the scripts, and then submit your backend for inclusion in pkgme.

You can also contact the developers, see the nascent website at pkgme.net, or visit the Launchpad page. (We are also very interested in help with the website and documentation if that is where you skills or interests lie.)

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rvr

Abstract.

  • The Cablegate set is composed of +250,000 diplomatic cables.
  • The total number sent by Embassies and Secretary of State is guessed.

One of the biggest mysteries in astrophysics is the dark matter. Dark matter can not be seen, it doesn't shine nor reflects light. But we infer its existence because dark matter weights, and modifies the path of stars and galaxies. Cablegate has its own dark matter.

According to WikiLeaks, 251,287 communications compose the Cablegate. But what is the real volume of cables between the Embassies and Secretary of State? Can we guess it? The answer is yes, there is a simple way to know it. Using the methodology explained below, the total number of communications between Embassies and the Secretary of State is guessed.

This are the results.

The dark matter of the Embassies.

20101224cablegate-darkmatter.001Between 2005-2009, more than 400,000 non leaked cables are identified. In this case, the uncertainty is larger than with just one embassy due to the small number or released cables. The sum increased by 50% in just one week.

Curiously, the average size of the 1800 published cables is 12 KB. If this average is representative of the whole set, something I doubt, the total size of the 250,000 messages would be 350 MB.

Secretary of State.

In addition to embassies' communications, Cablegate has some cables from the Secretary of State. This messages are often quite interesting, because they request information or send commands to the embassies (eg 09STATE106750).

20101224cablegate-darkmatter.002In 2005 and 2006 there is no released cable, and therefore the sum cannot be estimated. But between 2007 and 2009, the volume of cables sent by the Secretary of State is remarkable (so big, that I doubted that the record number was an ordinal number and not a more sophisticated identifier). Compare this graph with the one of the embassies. 2007 show more cables from the Secretary than all Embassies combined, but beware, because this trend can be reversed with better data.

This results are available in Google Docs.

Madrid Embassy.

This is the chart for Madrid Embassy, which ranks seventh in the number of leaked cables.

20101224cablegate-darkmatter.003Between 2004-2009, the existence of at least 17,000 dispatches sent from Madrid can be deduced. In the same period, there are just 3500 leaked cables. The graph shows the breakdown by year. 2007 is leaked in a high percentage, the oppositat in 2004 and 2005. Also, the number of communications decreases progressively (Why? Maybe other networks are used instead of SIPRNet). The complete table is available in Google Docs.

Cablegate Dark Matter Howto

The Guardian published a text file with dates, source and tags of the 250,000 diplomatic cables included in the Cablegate. The content of this messages are being slowly released. (Using this short descriptions, I did an analysis of the messages related to Spain -tagged as SP-, and suggested the existence of communications related to the 2004 Madrid bombings and the Spaniard Internet Law. Later, El País published this cables, confirming the suspicions).

To infer the volume of communications the methodology is quite simple. Each cable has an identifier. For example, 04MADRID893 summaries the Madrid bombing on March 11th, 2004. This identifier can be broken into three parts:

  • 04: Current year (2004).
  • MADRID: Origin (the Embassy in Madrid)
  • 893: Record number?

What's that record number? Let's investigate. There are some cables sent on December 2004 from Madrid Embassy, as 04MADRID4887 (dated December 29, 2004). Its record number is "4887". Another message sent on February has ID 04MADRID527, record number "527". Looking to others cables dated on January, seems obvious that the record number starts at 1 and goes up, one by one, through the year. The record number is a simple ordinal value. Thanks to this simple rule, and reading the last cables of Madrid Embassy on December 2004, we know it sent ~4900 cables that year alone.

Ideally, the last cable of the year from each Embassy would be available, but the Cablegate data is not complete. Just fraction of the leaked messages has been published so far and those last cables of the year may not be leaked in Cablegate anyway. But, as can be seen in the graphics, this method allows to do an approximation.

The code used for the calculations is available at github (cablegate-sp) and has a BSD license.

Out of sight, out of mind.

One month after the first cable release, only two thousand messages has been published. At this rate it will take a decade to release all Cablegate content. Maybe not all messages are as relevant as those released so far, eg boring messages about visas. But if WikiLeaks has raised such a stir with just 2000 cables, I cannot imagine which other secrets remain in those thousands unfiltered (although top-secret cables use other networks).

Anyway, I'm sure there is still a lot of data mining job to do with the cables.

(Spanish version of this article: Cablegate: Lo que no está en WikiLeaks).

PS (December 30th, 2010): Ricardo Estalmán linked to this entry on Wikipedia about the German tank problem during World War II:

«Suppose one is an Allied intelligence analyst during World War II, and one has some serial numbers of captured German tanks. Further, assume that the tanks are numbered sequentially from 1 to N. How does one estimate the total number of tanks?»

The Cablegate case is quite similar. I will update the estimation with the formula cited in the above article, as soon as possible (Xmas days!).

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This was the confusing part when I first ran couchapp to create a new app, I couldn't really see where the "entry point" of the app was. In the hope that it might help someone else I'm going to present a quick overview of the default setup.

index.html

The index.html page is a static attachement, and the user starts by requesting it with their browser.

It has some small amount of static HTML, part of which creates a div for the javascript to put the data in.

Either inline, or in an included file, there is a small bit of javascript that will initialise the couchapp.

By default this will use the div with the id items, and will attach an evently widget to it.

evently

The evently widget that is attached will then either have an _init event, or a _changes event, either of which will be immediately run by evently.

This event will usually make a couchdb query to get data to transform to HTML and present to the user (see part three for how this works.)

Once that data has been displayed the user any combination of evently widgets or javascript can be used to make further queries and build an app that works however you like.

Previous installments

See part one, part two, and part three.

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Introducing soupmatchers

jml just announced testtools 0.9.8 and in it mentioned the soupmatchers project that I started. Given that I haven't talked about it here before, I wanted to do a post to introduce it, and explain some of the rationale behind it.

soupmatchers is a library for unit testing HTML, allowing you to assert that certain things are present or not within an HTML string. Asserting this based on substring matching is going to be too fragile to be usable, and so soupmatchers works on a parsed representation of the HTML. It uses the wonderful BeautifulSoup library for parsing the HTML, and allows you to assert the presence or not of tags based on the attributes that you care about.

self.assertThat(some_html,
                HTMLContains(Tag('testtools link', 'a',
                attrs={'href': 'https://launchpad.net/testtools'})))

You can see more examples in the README.

Basing this on the testtools matchers frameworks allows you to do this in a semi-declarative way. I think there is a lot of potential here to improve your unit tests. For instance you can start to build a suite of matchers tailored to talking about the HTML that your application outputs. You can have matchers that match areas of the page, and then talk about other elements relative to them ("This link is placed within the sidebar"). One thing that particularly interests me is to create a class hierarchy that allows you test particular things across your application. For instance, you could have an ExternalLink class that asserts that a particular class is set on all of your external links. Assuming that you use this at the appropriate places in your tests then you will know that the style that is applied to class will be on all external links. Should you wish to change the way that external links are represented in the HTML you can change the one class and your tests should tell you all the places that the code has to be updated.

Please go ahead and try the library and let me know how it could be improved.

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[ Apologies to those that saw this half-finished when I published rather than saving a draft ]

This is the part that it took me a long time to understand: how the different parts of the default couchapp collaborate to present data to the user.

In this post I'm just going to deal with client-side couchapps using the default technologies. As explained in the previous post you can use any combination of HTML and javascript in a couchapp, and you can also do some of the work server-side in couchdb. However, I'm going to explain what the couchapp tool gives you when you create a new project, as that is where you are likely to be starting, and once you understand that you can choose where to deviate from that model.

jQuery events

Our first detour is in to a little bit of background, the excellent javascript libarary that is heavily used in couchapps.

jQuery allows for events on elements in the DOM. There are standard events, such as "click" and "submit", but you are free to define your own.

These events are given a name, and you can then "trigger" them, and bind handlers to act when they are triggered.

By building up events from low level ones such as "click", to more-complex and app-specific ones such as "item purchased", you can break down your code in to smaller chunks, and have different parts of the page react to the same event, such as having the "buy" link disappear from the item that the user just bought, as well as having the total of the shopping cart update.

Events can also have data, or arguments, that travels with them. For instance the "item purchased" event could have the item that was purchased as the data, so that handlers can make use of it when they run.

evently

Now that we know something about jQuery events, we can look at something built on top of them, the "evently" library. This is a layer on top of jQuery that allows you build up your app from pieces that have a specific function, and communicate through events.

An evently "widget" can be bound to an element (or several elements if you want). The widget is a bunch of event handlers which can do anything you like, but have some conveniences built in for fetching data and updating the page based on the result.

When an event is triggered the handler you defined is run. If it is a simple javascript function then that function is run, and can do anything you like.

{click: function() {
        alert("You clicked!");
    }
}

Often though you want to update the element based on the action. evently has built in support for the "mustache" templating language, and if you specify a template in that syntax it will replace the current HTML of the element that it is attached to with the result of rendering that template.

{click:
    {
        mustache: "<div>You clicked!</div>"
    }
}

Which will put "You clicked!" in to the page instead of in an alert. What if you don't want to replace the current content, and just want to append another line? For that use the "render" option.

{click:
    {
        mustache: "<div>You clicked!</div>",
        render: "append"
    }
}

Which would put another "You clicked!" on the page every time you click. As well as "append" there is also "prepend", or really any jQuery method that you want to call.

Simply rendering a static template isn't going to be very useful though, usually you want something dynamic. For that use the "data" option, which can just be an object if you want, but that's still not going to be very dynamic either, so it can be a function that returns an object.

{click:
    {
        data: function(e) {
            return {name, "Bob"};
        },
        mustache: "<div>Hi {{name}}!</div>"
    }
}

The data function gets passed the event object from jQuery (so you can e.g. get the target of the event), and any data for the event too (so it could see what item you just bought).

That's all well and good, but it doesn't help us get data from couchdb in to the page. For that we need the opportunity to make a request to couchdb. We could just fall back to using one function to handle the event, but then we lose the integration with mustache. Therefore there is an "async" key that allows us to make an AJAX request and then use mustache on the result.

{click:
    {
        async: function(callback) {
            /* some code that does an async request, and then calls callback with the result */
        },
        data: function(resp) {
            /* Some code that processes the data from the async function to ready it for the template */
        },
        mustache: "A tempate that will be rendered with the result of the data function"
    }
}

Now, writing an async method to query a couchdb view is so common in couchapps that eventy has special support for it. The query key can either be a json structure that specifies a view and the arguments to it, or a function that returns such a structure based on things such as the query string in the URL.

There are two further functions that you will find helpful from time to time. The first is before that allows you to run some code before the rest of the process starts, and may do something such as trigger another event. The other is its partner after, which can do much the same things as before, but can also do things such as modify the HTML that is output.

Lastly there is another thing that can be done with the HTML that is output, specified with they selectors key. This allows you to perform an action on particular parts of the html. The keys of this structure are jQuery selectors that specify which elements the function will be applied to. For instance you can do something with all the divs in the output, or all the spans with a certain class, or the form with a particular id.

What you can do to those elements is basically unlimited, as you can run arbitrary javascript. However, there is built in support for specifying an evently widget, which will automatically be bound to each element that matches the selector. This nesting is one of the most powerful and useful features of evently, and one you should generally be using often. I will probably talk more about what nested widgets are useful for later.

Special evently events

evently has two special events. The first of these is _init. This event is triggered when the widget is created. This means you can dynamically pre-populate the element, or at least keep the inital state of the element with the rest of your code, rather than putting some in the HTML file and the rest in evently code.

The other special event is tied to couchdb, and is the _changes event, and is triggered whenever the database that the couchapp is in changes. This means that you can have elements on the page that dynamically update whenever the database changes, whether that is through user action, another user doing something, external scripts, or couchdb replication. This makes it very easy to write "live" pages that show updates without refreshes, and is very useful for some applications.

Currently _changes doesn't receive the modified documents, so it is normally just used to make another request to get the updated information, whether that be through async or view. If you wish to get the modified documents in order to update the page directly and reduce requests then you can write some custom code to do this.

Conclusion

As you have seen, evently is just a thin layer on top of jQuery concepts such as events and asynchronous events, with some conveniences for templating and interacting with couchdb.

This combination is well suited to the needs of at least simple and moderately complex couchapps, while still being very powerful, and allowing you to fall back to custom javascript at any point.

You can find more about evently at the couchapp site.

See part one and part two.

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This is the part that it took me a long time to understand: how the different parts of the default couchapp collaborate to present data to the user.

In this post I'm just going to deal with client-side couchapps using the default technologies. As explained in the previous post you can use any combination of HTML and javascript in a couchapp, and you can also do some of the work server-side in couchdb. However, I'm going to explain what the couchapp tool gives you when you create a new project, as that is where you are likely to be starting, and once you understand that you can choose where to deviate from that model.

jQuery events

Our first detour is in to a little bit of background, the excellent javascript libarary that is heavily used in couchapps.

jQuery allows for events on elements in the DOM. There are standard events, such as "click" and "submit", but you are free to define your own.

These events are given a name, and you can then "trigger" them, and bind handlers to act when they are triggered.

By building up events from low level ones such as "click", to more-complex and app-specific ones such as "item purchased", you can break down your code in to smaller chunks, and have different parts of the page react to the same event, such as having the "buy" link disappear from the item that the user just bought, as well as having the total of the shopping cart update.

Events can also have data, or arguments, that travels with them. For instance the "item purchased" event could have the item that was purchased as the data, so that handlers can make use of it when they run.

evently

Now that we know something about jQuery events, we can look at something built on top of them, the "evently" library. This is a layer on top of jQuery that allows you build up your app from pieces that have a specific function, and communicate through events.

An evently "widget" can be bound to an element (or several elements if you want). The widget is a bunch of event handlers which can do anything you like, but have some conveniences built in for fetching data and updating the page based on the result.

When an event is triggered the handler you defined is run. If it is a simple javascript function then that function is run, and can do anything you like.

::
{click: function() {
alert("You clicked!");

System Message: WARNING/2 (<string>, line 57)

Block quote ends without a blank line; unexpected unindent.

}

System Message: WARNING/2 (<string>, line 58)

Definition list ends without a blank line; unexpected unindent.

}

Often though you want to update the element based on the action. evently has built in support for the "mustache" templating language, and if you specify a template in that syntax it will replace the current HTML of the element that it is attached to with the result of rendering that template.

::
{click:
{
mustache: "<div>You clicked!</div>"

System Message: WARNING/2 (<string>, line 70)

Definition list ends without a blank line; unexpected unindent.

}

System Message: WARNING/2 (<string>, line 71)

Definition list ends without a blank line; unexpected unindent.

}

Which will put "You clicked!" in to the page instead of in an alert. What if you don't want to replace the current content, and just want to append another line? For that use the "render" option.

::
{click:
{
mustache: "<div>You clicked!</div>", render: "append"

System Message: WARNING/2 (<string>, line 82)

Definition list ends without a blank line; unexpected unindent.

}

System Message: WARNING/2 (<string>, line 83)

Definition list ends without a blank line; unexpected unindent.

}

Which would put another "You clicked!" on the page every time you click. As well as "append" there is also "prepend", or really any jQuery method that you want to call.

Simply rendering a static template isn't going to be very useful though, usually you want something dynamic. For that use the "data" option, which can just be an object if you want, but that's still not going to be very dynamic either, so it can be a function that returns an object.

::
{click:
{
data: function(e) {
return {name, "Bob"};

System Message: WARNING/2 (<string>, line 99)

Definition list ends without a blank line; unexpected unindent.

}, mustache: "<div>Hi {{name}}!</div>"

System Message: WARNING/2 (<string>, line 101)

Definition list ends without a blank line; unexpected unindent.

}

System Message: WARNING/2 (<string>, line 102)

Definition list ends without a blank line; unexpected unindent.

}

The data function gets passed the event object from jQuery (so you can e.g. get the target of the event), and any data for the event too (so it could see what item you just bought).

That's all well and good, but it doesn't help us get data from couchdb in to the page. For that we need the opportunity to make a request to couchdb. We could just fall back to using one function to handle the event, but then we lose the integration with mustache. Therefore there is an "async" key that allows us to make an AJAX request and then use mustache on the result.

See part one and part two.

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Today I would like to talk about the couchapp tool. This is something that you can use when working on couchapps, and provides a way to quickly iterate your design.

However, rather confusingly, the couchapp tool isn't actually required for couchapps. If you get a design document with HTML attachments in to your database then you have a couchapp.

Why would you want to use such a tool then? Firstly because it will generate a skeleton couchapp for you, so that you don't have to remember how to organise it, and if it is your first couchapp it's good to start from something working.

More importantly though, the couchapp tool is useful as you develop as it allows you to edit the parts of your app in their native format. This means that if you are writing a HTML snippet you can just put some HTML in a file, rather than having to write it as part of a deeply nested JSON structure and deal with the errors that you would make if you did that. Also it means that you can use things like syntax highlighting in your preferred text editor without any special magic.

How it works

At it's core couchapp is a rather simple tool. It walks a filesystem tree and assembles the things that it finds there in to a JSON document.

For instance, if it finds a directory at the root of the tree called _attachments it puts the content of each file there in to a list which it puts in to the dict with an "_attachments" key, Which is one of the ways that couchdb accepts document attachments. Therefore if you have an _attachments/index.html file in your tree it will be attached to your design document when the JSON structure is sent to couchdb.

This continues across the tree, so the contents of the "views" directory will become the "views" key of the documents, which is how you do map/reduce queries on the database.

couchapp has various conventions for dealing with files. For instance if it finds a ".js" file it treats it as a javascript snippet which will be encoded in to a string in the resulting document. ".html" files outside of the "_attachments" directory will also be encoded as strings. If it finds a ".json" file then it treats it as literal JSON that will be embebedded.

This way it builds up the JSON structure that a couchapp expects, and will send it to the couchdb of your choice when it is done.

In addition to this functionality the tool can also generate you a skeleton app, and also add new pieces to your app, such as new views.

Getting It

couchapp is a python tool, so you can install it using pip or similar. However, Ubuntu users can install it from a PPA (yay for daily builds with recipes!).

Using It

To use it run

couchapp generate myapp

which will create you a new skeleton in myapp.

cd myapp
ls

You will see for instance the _attachments and views directories, and an _attachments/index.html.

To get your app in to couchdb you can run

couchapp push http://localhost:5984/mydb

and it will tell you the URL to visit to see your new app.

If you want to use desktopcouch you can run

couchapp push desktopcouch://

though I think it has a bug that it prints the wrong URLs when pushing to desktopcouch.

Once you have looked at the HTML generated by your app you should look at the design document that couchapp created. Go to

http://localhost:5984/_utils

or

xdg-open ~/.local/share/desktop-couch/couchdb.html

if you are using desktopcouch.

Click to the mydb database and you will see a document called _design/myapp. Click on this and you will see the content of the design document; you are looking at a couchapp in its raw form.

If you compare what is in that design document with what is in the myapp directory that the tool created you should start to see how it generates it from the filesystem.

Now try making a change on the filesystem, for instance edit _attachments/index.html and put your name somewhere in the body. Then push again, running

couchapp push http://localhost:5984/mydb

and refresh the page in your browser and you should see the change. (Just click on index.html in the design document to get back to viewing your app from there).

I will go in to more detail about the content of the couchapp that was generated for you in another post.

See the previous installment.

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Couchapps are a particular way of using couchdb that allow you to serve web applications directly from the database. These applications generate HTML and javascript to present data from couchdb to the user, and then update the database and the UI based on their actions.

Of course there are plenty of frameworks out there that do this sort of thing, and more and more of them are adding couchdb support. What makes couchapps particularly interesting are two things. Firstly, the ease with which they can be developed and deployed. As they are served directly from couchdb they require little infrastructure, and the couchapp tool allows for a rapid iteration. In addition, the conveniences that are provided mean that simple things can be done very quickly with little code.

The other thing that makes couchapps attractive is that they live inside the database. This means that the code lives alongside the data, and will travel with it as it is replicated. This means that you can easily have an app that you have fast, local access to on your desktop, while at the same time replicating to a server so that you can access the same data from your phone while you are out. Again, this doesn't require couchapps, and they won't be suitable for all needs, but they are certainly an interesting idea.

You can read more about couchapps at http://couchapp.org.

Intrigued by couchapps I set out to play with them over a weekend. Unfortunately the documentation is rather lacking currently, so I wouldn't recommend experimenting yourself if you are not happy digging around for answers, and sometimes not finding them outside the code. In order to go a little way to rectifying this, I intend to write a few posts about the things I wish I had known when I started out. I found everything to be a little strange at first, and it wasn't even clear where the entry point of a couchapp was for instance. Hopefully these posts will be found using google by others who are struggling in a similar way.

Architecture

Firstly something about the pieces that make up a couchapp (or at least those that the tool and documentation recommend,) and the way that they all fit together.

At the core is the couchdb database itself. It is a collection of "documents", each of which can have attachments. Some of these documents are known as "design documents," and they start with a prefix of "_design." Design documents can have "view" functions, and various other special fields that can be used to query or manipulate other documents.

A couchapp is a design document with an attachment, usually called index.html. These attachments are served directly by couchdb and can be accessed at a known URL. You can put anything you like in that html file, and you could just have a static page if you wanted. Usually however though it is is an HTML page that uses javascript in order to display the results of queries on the database. The user will then access the attachment on the design document, and will interact with the resulting page.

In theory you can do anything you like in that page, but it is usual to make use of standard tools in order to query the database and provide information and opportunity for interaction to the user.

The first standard tool is jQuery, with a couple of plugins for working with couchdb and couchapps specifically. These allow for querying views in the database and acting on the results, retrieving and updating documents, and plenty more.

In addition the couchapp tool sets you up with another jQuery plugin called "evently", which is a way to structure interactions with jQuery, and change the page based on various events. I will go in to more detail about how evently works in a later post.

In addition to all the client-side tools for interacting with the database, it is also possible to make use of couchdb features such as shows, lists, update handlers validation functions in order to move some of the processing server-side. This is useful for various reasons, including being more accessible, allowing search engines to index the content, and not having to trust the client not to take malicious actions.

The two approaches can be combined, and you can prototype with the client-side tools, and then move some of the work to the server-side facilities later.

Stay tuned for more on how a simple couchapp generates content based on what is in the db.

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The examples for Django testing point you towards hardcoding a username and password for a user to impersonate in tests, and the API of the test client encourages this too.

However, Django has a nice pluggable authentication system that means you can easily use something such as OpenID instead of passwords.

Putting the passwords in your tests ties you to having the password support enabled, and while you could do this for just the tests, it's completely out of the scope of most tests (I'm not talking about any tests for the actual login process here.)

When I saw this while reviewing code recently I worked with Zygmunt to write a Client subclass that didn't have this restriction. With this subclass you can just choose a User object, and have that client login as that user, without them having to have a password at all. Doing this decoples your tests from the implementation of the authentication system, and makes them target the code you want to test more precisely.

Here's the code:

from django.conf import settings
from django.contrib.auth import login
from django.http import HttpRequest
from django.test.client import Client


class TestClient(Client):

    def login_user(self, user):
        """
        Login as specified user, does not depend on auth backend (hopefully)

        This is based on Client.login() with a small hack that does not
        require the call to authenticate()
        """
        if not 'django.contrib.sessions' in settings.INSTALLED_APPS:
            raise AssertionError("Unable to login without django.contrib.sessions in INSTALLED_APPS")
        user.backend = "%s.%s" % ("django.contrib.auth.backends",
                                  "ModelBackend")
        engine = import_module(settings.SESSION_ENGINE)

        # Create a fake request to store login details.
        request = HttpRequest()
        if self.session:
            request.session = self.session
        else:
            request.session = engine.SessionStore()
        login(request, user)

        # Set the cookie to represent the session.
        session_cookie = settings.SESSION_COOKIE_NAME
        self.cookies[session_cookie] = request.session.session_key
        cookie_data = {
            'max-age': None,
            'path': '/',
            'domain': settings.SESSION_COOKIE_DOMAIN,
            'secure': settings.SESSION_COOKIE_SECURE or None,
            'expires': None,
        }
        self.cookies[session_cookie].update(cookie_data)

        # Save the session values.
        request.session.save()

Then you can use it in your tests like this:

from django.contrib.auth.models import User


client = TestClient()
user = User(username="eve")
user.save()
client.login_user(user)

Then any requests you make with that client will be authenticated as the user that was created.

Ticket submitted with Django to have this available for everyone in future.

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Normally when you write some code using launchpadlib you end up with Launchpad showing your users something like this:

/images/lplib-before.png

This isn't great, how is the user supposed to know which option to click? What do you do if they don't choose the option you want?

Instead it's possible to limit the choices that the user has to make to only those that your application can use, plus the option to deny all access, by changing the way you create your Launchpad object.

from launchpadlib.launchpad import Launchpad

lp = Launchpad.get_token_and_login("testing", allow_access_levels=["WRITE_PUBLIC"])

This will present your users with something like this:

/images/lplib-after.png

which is easier to understand. There could be further improvements, but they would happen on the Launchpad side.

This approach works for both Launchpad.get_token_and_login and Launchpad.login_with.

The values that you can pass here aren't documented, and should probably be constants in launchpadlib, rather than hardcoded in every application, but for now you can use:

  • READ_PUBLIC
  • READ_PRIVATE
  • WRITE_PUBLIC
  • WRITE_PRIVATE

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Dear Mr Neary, thanks for your thought provoking post, I think it is a problem we need to be aware of as Free Software matures.

Firstly though I would like to say that the apparent ageism present in your argument isn't helpful to your point. Your comments appear to diminish the contributions of a whole generation of people. In addition, we shouldn't just be concerned with attracting young people to contribute, the same changes will have likely reduced the chances that people of all ages will get involved.

Aside from that though there is much to discuss. You talk about the changes in Free Software since you got involved, and it mirrors my observations. While these changes may have forced fewer people to learn all the details of how the system works, they have certainly allowed more people to use the software, bringing many different skills to the party with them.

I would contend that often the experience for those looking to do the compilation that you rate as important has parallels to the experience of just using the software you present from a few years ago. If we can change that experience as much as we have the installation and first use experience then we will empower more people to take part in those activities.

It is instructive then to look at how the changes came about to see if there are any pointers for us. I think there are two causes of the change that are of interest to this discussion.

Firstly, one change has been an increased focus on user experience. Designing and building software that serves the users needs has made it much more palatable for people, and reduced the investment that people have to make before using it. In the same way I think we should focus on developer experience, making it more pleasant to perform some of the tasks needed to be a hobbyist. Yes, this means hiding some of the complexity to start with, but that doesn't mean that it can't be delved in to later. Progressive exposure will help people to learn by not requiring them to master the art before being able to do anything.

Secondly, there has been a push to make informed decisions on behalf of the user when providing them with the initial experience. You no longer get a base system after installation, upon which you are expected to select from the thousands of packages to build your perfect environment. Neither are you led to download multiple CDs that contain the entire contents of a distribution, much of which is installed by default. Instead you are given an environment that is already equipped to do common tasks, where each task is covered by an application that has been selected by experts on your behalf.

We should do something similar with developer tools, making opinionated decisions for the new developer, and allowing them to change things as they learn, similar to the way in which you are still free to choose from the thousands of packages in the distribution repositories. Doing this makes documentation easier to write, allows for knowledge sharing, and reduces the chances of paralysis of choice.

There are obviously difficulties with this given that often the choice of tool that one person makes on a project dicatates or heavily influences the choice other people have to make. If you choose autotools for your projects then I can't build it with CMake. Our development tools are important to us as they shape the environment in which we work, so there are strong opinions, but perhaps consistency could become more of a priority. There are also things we can do with libraries, format specifications and wrappers to allow choice while still providing a good experience for the fledgling developer.

Obviously as we are talking about free software the code will always be available, but that isn't enough in my mind. It needs to be easier to go from code to something you can install and remove, allowing you to dig deeper once you have achieved that.

I believe that our effort around things like https://dev.launchpad.net/BuildBranchToArchive will go some way to helping with this.

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If you don't want to read this article, then just steer clear of python-multiprocessing, threads and glib in the same application. Let me explain why.

There's a rather famous bug in Gwibber in Ubuntu Lucid, where a gwibber-service process will start taking 100% of the CPU time of one of your cores if it can. While looking in to why this bug happened I learnt a lot about how multiprocessing and GLib work, and wanted to record some of this so that others may avoid the bear traps.

Python's multiprocessing module is a nice module to allow you to easily run some code in a subprocess, to get around the restriction of the GIL for example. It makes it really easy to run a particular function in a subprocess, which is a step up from what you had to do before it existed. However, when using it you should be aware how the way it works can interact with the rest of your app, because there are some possible nasties lurking there.

GLib is a set of building blocks for apps, most notably used by GTK+. It provides an object system, a mainloop and lots more besides. What we are most interested here is the mainloop, signals, and thread integration that it provides.

Let's start the explanation by looking at how multiprocessing does its thing. When you start a subprocess using multiprocessing.Process, or something that uses it, it causes a fork(2), which starts a new process with a copy of the programs current memory, with some exceptions. This is really nice for multiprocessing, as you can just run any code from that program in the subprocess and pass the result back without too much difficulty.

The problems occur because there isn't an exec(3) to accompany the fork(2). This is what makes multiprocessing so easy to use, but doesn't insert a clean process boundary between the processes. Most notably for this example, it means the child inherits the file descriptors of the parent (critically even those marked FD_CLOEXEC).

The other piece to this puzzle is how the GLib mainloop communicates between threads. It requires some mechanism where one thread can alert another that something of interest happened. To do this when you tell GLib that you will be using threads in your app by calling g_thread_init (gobject.threads_init() in Python) then it will create a pipe for use by glib to alert other threads. It also creates a watcher thread that polls one end of this pipe so that it can act when a thread wishes to pass something on to the mainloop.

The final part of the puzzle is what your app does in a subprocess with mutliprocessing. If you purely do something such as number crunching then you won't have any issues. If however you use some glib functions that will cause the child to communicate with the mainloop then you will see problems.

As the child inherits the file descriptors of the parent it will use the same pipe for communication. Therefore if a function in the child writes to this pipe then it can put the parent in to a confused state. What happens in gwibber is that it uses some gnome-keyring functions and that puts the parent in to a state where the watcher thread created by g_thread_init busy-polls on the pipe, taking up as much CPU time as it can get from one core.

In summary, you will see issues if you use python-multiprocessing from a thread and use some glib functions in the children.

There are some ways to fix this, but no silver bullet:

  • Don't use threads, just use multiprocessing. However, you can't communicate with glib signals between subprocesses, and there's no equivalent built in to multiprocessing.
  • Don't use glib functions from the children.
  • Don't use multiprocessing to run the children, use exec(3) a script that does what you want, but this isn't as flexible or as convenient.

It may be possible to use the support for different GMainContexts for different threads to work around this, but:

  • You can't access this from Python, and
  • I'm not sure that every library you use will correctly implement it, and so you may still get issues.

Note that none of the parties here are doing anything particularly wrong, it's a bad interaction caused by some decisions that are known to cause issues with concurrency. I also think there are issues when using DBus from multiprocessing children, but I haven't thoroughly investigated that. I'm not entirely sure why the multiprocessing child seems to have to be run from a non-main thread in the parent to trigger this, any insight would be welcome. You can find a small script to reproduce the problem here.

Or, to put it another way, global state bad for concurrency.

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As my contribution to Ada Lovelace Day 2010 I would like to mention Emma Jane Hogbin.

Emma is an Ubuntu Member, published author, documentation evangelist, conference organiser, Drupal theming expert, tireless conference presenter, and many more things as well.

Her enthusiasm is infectious, and her passion for solving problems for people is admirable. She is a constant source of inspiration to me, and that continues even as she branches out in to new things.

(Hat tip for the title to the ever excellent Sharrow)

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Commit access is no more

Many projects that I work on, or follow the development of, and granted there may be a large selection bias here, are showing some of the same tendencies. Combined these indicate to me that we need to change the way we look at becoming a trusted member of the project.

The obvious change here is the move to distributed version control. I'm obviously a fan of this change, and for many reasons. One of those is the democratisation of the tools. There is no longer a special set of people that gets to use the best tools, with everyone else having to make do. Now you get to use the same tools whether you were the founder of the project, or someone working on your first change. That's extremely beneficial as it means that we don't partition our efforts to improve the tools we use. It also means that new contributors have an easier time getting started, as they get to use better tools. These two influences combine as well: a long time contributor can describe how they achieve something, and the new contributor can directly apply it, as they use the same tools.

This change does mean that getting "commit access" isn't about getting the ability to commit anymore; everyone can commit anytime to their own branch. Some projects, e.g. Bazaar, don't even hand out "commit access" in the literal sense, the project blessed code is handled by a robot, you just get the ability to have the robot merge a branch.

While it is true that getting "commit access" was never really about the tools, it was and is about being trusted to shepherd the shared code, a lot of projects still don't treat it that way. Once a developer gets "commit access" they just start committing every half-cooked patch they have to trunk. The full use of distributed version control, with many branches, just emphasises the shared code aspect. Anyone is free to create a branch with their half-baked idea and see if anyone else likes it. The "blessed" branch is just that, one that the project as a whole decides they will collaborate on.

This leads to my second change, code review. This is something that I also deeply believe in; it is vital to quality, and a point at which open source software becomes a massive advantage, so something we should exploit to the full. I see it used increasingly in many projects, and many moving up jml's code review "ladder" towards pre-merge review of every change. There seems to be increasing acceptance that code review is valuable, or at least that it is something a good project does.

Depending on the project the relationship of code review and "commit access" can vary, but at the least, someone with "commit access" can make their code review count. Some projects will not allow even those with "commit access" to act unilaterally, requiring multiple reviews, and some may even relegate the concept, working off votes from whoever is interested in the change.

At the very least, most projects will have code review when a new contributor wishes to make a change. This typically means that when you are granted "commit access" you are able or expected to review other people's code, even though you may never have done so before. Some projects also require every contribution to be reviewed, meaning that "commit access" doesn't grant you the ability to do as you wish, it instead just puts the onus on you to review the code of others as well as write your own.

As code review becomes more prevalent we need to re-examine what we see as "commit access," and how people show that they are ready for it. It may be that the concept becomes "trusted reviewer" or similar, but at the least code review will be a large part of it. Therefore I feel that we shouldn't just be looking at a person's code contributions, but also their code review contributions. Code review is a skill, some people are very good at it, some people are very very bad at it. You can improve with practice and teaching, and you can set bad examples for others if you are not careful. We will have to make sure that review runs through the blood of a project, everyone reviews the code of everyone else, and the reviews are reviewed.

The final change that I see as related is that of empowering non-code contributors. More and more projects are valuing these contributors, and one important part of doing that is trusting them with responsibility. It may be that sometimes trusting them means giving them "commit access", if they are working on improving the inline help for instance. Yes, it may be that distributed version control and code review mean that they do not have to do this, but those arguments could be made for code contributors too.

This leads me to another, and perhaps the most important, aspect of the "commit access" idea: trust. The fundamental, though sometimes unspoken, measure we use to gauge if someone should get "commit access" is whether we believe them to be trustworthy. Do we trust them to introduce code without review? Do we trust them to review other people's changes? Do we trust them to change only those areas they are experts in, or to speak to someone else if they are not? This is the rule we should be applying when making this decision, and we should be sure to be aware that this is what we are doing. There will often be other considerations as well, but this decision will always factor.

These ideas are not new, and the influences described here did not create them. However the confluence of them, and the changes that will likely happen in our projects over the next few years, mean that we must be sure to confront them. We must discard the "commit access" idea as many projects have seen it, and come up with new responsibilities that better reflect the tasks people are doing, the new ways projects operate, and that reward the interactions that make our projects stronger.

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