Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'summit'

David Planella

Ubuntu is about people

Ubuntu has been around for just over a decade. That’s a long time for a project built around a field that evolves at such a rapid pace as computing. And not just any computing –software made for (and by) human beings, who have also inevitably grown and evolved with Ubuntu.

Over the years, Ubuntu has changed and has lead change to keep thriving in such a competitive space. The first years were particularly exciting: there was so much to do, countless possibilities and plenty of opportunities to contribute.

Everyone that has been around for a while has fond memories of the Ubuntu Developer Summit, UDS in short. An in-person event run every 6 months to plan the next version of the OS. Representatives of different areas of the community came together every half year, somewhere in the US or Europe, to discuss, design and lay out the next cycle, both in terms of community and technology.

It was in this setting where Ubuntu governance and leadership were discussed, the decisions of which default apps to include were made, the switch to Unity’s new UX, and much more. It was a particularly intense event, as often discussions continued into the hallways and sometimes up to the bar late at night.

In a traditionally distributed community, where discussions and planning happen online and across timezones, getting physically together in one place helped us more effectively resolve complex issues, bring new ideas, and often agree to disagree in a respectful environment.

Ubuntu Catalan team party

This makes Ubuntu special

Change takes courage, it takes effort in thinking outside the box and going all the way through, but it is not always popular. I personally believe, though, that without disruptive changes we wouldn’t be where we are today: millions of devices shipped with Ubuntu pre-installed, leadership in the cloud space, Ubuntu phones shipped worldwide, the convergence story, Ubuntu on drones, IoT… and a strong, welcoming and thriving community.

At some point, UDS morphed into UOS, an online-only event, which despite its own merits and success, it does admittedly lack the more personal component. This is where we are now, and this is not a write-up to hark back to the good old days, or to claim that all decisions we’ve made were optimal –acknowledging those lead by Canonical.

Ubuntu has evolved, we’ve solved many of the technological issues we were facing in the early days, and in many areas Ubuntu as a platform “just works”. Where we were seeing interest in contributing to the plumbing of the OS in the past, today we see a trend where communities emerge to contribute taking advantage of a platform to build upon.

Ubuntu Convergence

The full Ubuntu computer experience, in your pocket

Yet Ubuntu is just as exciting as it was in those days. Think about carrying your computer running Ubuntu in your pocket and connecting it to your monitor at home for the full experience, think about a fresh and vibrant app developer community, think about an Open Source OS powering the next generation of connected devices and drones. The areas of opportunity to get involved are much more diverse than they have ever been.

And while we have adapted to technological and social change in the project over the years, what hasn’t changed is one of the fundamental values of Ubuntu: its people.

To me personally, when I put aside open source and exciting technical challenges, I am proud to be part of this community because its open, welcoming, it’s driven by collaboration, I keep meeting and learning from remarkable individuals, I’ve made friendships that have lasted years… and I could go on forever. We are essentially people who share a mission: that of bringing access to computer to everyone, via Free Software and open collaboration.

And while over the years we have learnt to work productively in a remote environment, the need to socialize is still there and as important as ever to reaffirm this bonding that keep us together.

Enter UbuCons.

The rise of the UbuCons

UbuCons are in-person conferences around the world, fully driven by teams of volunteers who are passionate about Ubuntu and about community. They are also a remarkable achievement, showing an exceptional commitment and organizational effort from Ubuntu advocates to make them happen.

Unlike other big Ubuntu events such as release parties -celebrating new releases every six months- UbuCons happen generally once a year. They vary in size, going from tens to hundreds to thousands, include talks by Ubuntu community members and cross-collaboration with other Open Source communities. Most importantly, they are always events to remember.

UbuCons across the globe

A network of UbuCons

A few months back, at the Ubuntu Community Team we started thinking of how we could bring the community together in a similar way we used to do with a big central event, but also in a way that was sustainable and community-driven.

The existing network of UbuCons came as the natural vehicle for this, and in this time we’ve been working closely with UbuCon organizers to take UbuCons up a notch. It has been from this team work where initiatives such as the UbuContest leading to UbuCon DE in Berlin were made possible. And more support for worldwide UbuCons general: in terms of speakers and community donations to cover some of the organizational cost for instance, or most recently the UbuCon site.

It has been particularly rewarding for us to have played even a small part on this, where the full credit goes to the international teams of UbuCon organizers. Today, six UbuCons are running worldwide, with future plans for more.

And enter the Summit

Community power

Community power

But we were not content yet. With UbuCons covering a particular geographical area, we still felt a bigger, more centralized event was needed for the community to rally around.

The idea of expanding to a bigger summit had already been brainstormed with members of the Ubuntu California LoCo in the months coming to the last UbuCon @ SCALE in LA. Building up on the initial concept, the vision for the Summit was penciled in at the Community Leadership Summit (CLS) 2015 together with representatives from the Ubuntu Community Council.

An UbuCon Summit is a super-UbuCon, if you will: with some of the most influential members of the wider Ubuntu community, with first-class talks content, and with a space for discussions to help shape the future of particular areas of Ubuntu. It’s the evolution of an UbuCon.

UbuCon Europe planning

The usual suspects planning the next UbuCon Europe

As a side note, I’m particularly happy to see that the US Summit organization has already set the wheels in motion for another summit in Europe next year. A couple of months ago I had the privilege to take part in one of the most reinvigorating online sessions I’ve been in recent times, where a highly enthusiastic and highly capable team of organizers started laying out the plans for UbuCon Europe in Germany next year! But back to the topic…

Today, the first UbuCon Summit in the US is brought to you by a passionate team of organizers in the Ubuntu California LoCo, the Ubuntu Community Team at Canonical and SCALE, who hope you enjoy it and contribute to the event as much as we are planning to :-)

Jono Bacon, who we have to thank for participating in and facilitating the initial CLS discussions, wrote an excellent blog post on why you should go to UbuCon in LA in January, which I highly recommend you read.

In a nutshell, here’s what to expect at the UbuCon Summit:
– A two-day, two-track conference
– User and developer talks by the best experts in the Ubuntu community
– An environment to propose topics, participate and influence Ubuntu
– Social events to network and get together with those who make Ubuntu
100% Free registration, although we encourage participants to also consider registering for the full 4 days of SCALE 14x, who are the host to the UbuCon

I’m really looking forward to meeting everyone there, to seeing old and new faces and getting together to keep the big Ubuntu wheels turning.

The post Ubuntu is about people appeared first on David Planella.

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Daniel Holbach

Ubuntu Online Summit featured more than 70 sessions this time around and quite a big turnout. You can find the full schedule with links to session videos and session notes in summit.ubuntu.com.

Here’s a quick summary of what happened in Snappy Ubuntu Core land:

  • Testing Snappy: In this Show & Tell session Leo Arias showcased a lot of the QA work which has been done on Ubuntu Core along with many useful techniques to run tests and easily bring up Snappy in a number of different scenario.
  • Creating more Snappy frameworks: Frameworks are an effective way to bring functionality to Ubuntu Core which can then be shared by apps. The session attracted quite a few users of Snappy who wanted to know if their use-case could be addressed by a framework. We discussed some more technical difficulties, possible solutions and learned that bluetooth and connectivity (based on network-manager) frameworks are in the works.
  • Snappy Clinic: bringing ROS apps to Snappy Ubuntu Core: Ted Gould showed off the great work which has been put into the catkin plugin of Snapcraft. Taking a simple ROS app and bringing it to Ubuntu Core is very easy. The interest from members of the ROS community was great to see and their feedback will help us improve the support even further.
  • Snap packages for phone and desktop apps: Alejandro Cura and Kyle Fazzari brought up their analysis of snappy on the phone/desktop and discussed a plan on what would need to land to make snappy apps on the Ubuntu desktop and phone a reality.
  • Your feedback counts: the Snappy onboarding experience: This session brought together a number of different users of Snappy who shared their experience and what they would like to do. The feedback was great and will be factored into our upcoming documentation plans.
  • Snappy Developer Community Resources: In this session Thibaut Rouffineau and I had a chat about our online support options and community resources. We gathered a number of ideas and will look into creating workshop and presentation materials this cycle as well.
  • Porting popular apps/software to Snappy: Many interesting apps and appliances exist for a variety of boards, most notably the Raspberry Pi. We put together a plan on how we could start a community initiative for bringing them over to Snappy Ubuntu Core.

Thanks to everyone who participated and helped to make this such a great UOS!

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David Planella

Ubuntu Online Summit
Starting on Tuesday 3rd to Thursday 5th of November, a new edition of the Ubuntu Online Summit is taking place next week.

Three days of free and live content all around Ubuntu and Open Source: discussions, tutorials, demos, presentations and Q+As for anyone to get in touch with the latest news and technologies, and get started contributing to Ubuntu.

The tracks

As in previous editions, the sessions runs along multiple tracks that group related topics as a theme:

  • App & scope development: the SDK and developer platform roadmaps, phone core apps planning, developer workshops
  • Cloud: Ubuntu Core on clouds, Juju, Cloud DevOps discussions, charm tutorials, the Charm, OpenStack
  • Community: governance discussions, community event planning, Q+As, how to get involved in Ubuntu
  • Convergence: the road to convergence, the Ubuntu desktop roadmap, requirements and use cases to bring the desktop and phone together
  • Core: snappy Ubuntu Core, snappy post-vivid plans, snappy demos and Q+As
  • Show & Tell: presentations, demos, lightning talks (read: things that break and explode) on a varied range of topics

The highlights

Here are some of my personal handpicks on sessions not to miss:

  • Opening keynote: Mark Shuttleworth, Canonical and Ubuntu founder will be opening the Online Summit with his keynote, on Tuesday 3rd Nov, 14:00 UTC
  • Ask the CEO: Jane Silber, Canonical’s CEO will be talking with the audience and answering questions from the community on her Q+A session, on Wednesday 4th Nov, 17:00 UTC
  • Snappy Clinic: join the snappy team on an interactive session about bringing robotics to Ubuntu – porting ROS apps to snappy Ubuntu Core, on Tuesday 3rd Nov, 18:00 UTC
  • JavaScript scopes hands-on: creating Ubuntu phone scopes is now easier than ever with JavaScript; learn all about it with resident scopes expert Marcus Tomlinson on Thursday 5th Nov, 15:00 UTC
  • An introduction to LXD: Stéphane Graber will be demoing LXD, the container hypervisor, and discussing features and upcoming plans on Thursday 5th Nov, 16:00 UTC
  • UbuCon Europe planning: a community team around the Ubuntu German LoCo will be getting together to plan the next in-person UbuCon Summit in Europe next year on Wednesday 4th Nov, 18:00 UTC

Check out the full schedule for more! >

Participating

Joining the summit is easy. Simply remember to:

Once you’ve done that, there are different ways of taking part online event via video hangouts and IRC:

  • Participate or watch sessions – everyone is welcome to participate and join a discussion to provide input or offer contribution. If you prefer to take a rear seat, that’s fine too. You can either subscribe to sessions, watch them on your browser or directly join a live hangout.
  • Propose a session – do you want to take a more active role in contributing to Ubuntu? Do you have a topic you’d like to discuss, or an idea you’d like to implement? Then you’ll probably want to propose a session to make it happen. There is still a week for accepting proposals, so why don’t you go ahead and propose a session?

Looking forward to seeing you all at the Summit!

The post The Ubuntu Online Summit starts next week appeared first on David Planella.

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David Planella

ubuntu-community
I am thrilled to announce the next big event in the Ubuntu calendar: the UbuCon Summit, taking place in Pasadena, CA, in the US, from the 21st to 22nd of January 2016, hosted at SCALE and with Mark Shuttleworth on the opening keynote.

Taking UbuCons to the next level

UbuCons are a remarkable achievement from the Ubuntu community: a network of conferences across the globe, organized by volunteers passionate about Open Source and about collaborating, contributing, and socializing around Ubuntu. The UbuCon at SCALE has been one of the most successful ones, and this year we are kicking it up a notch.

Enter the UbuCon Summit. In discussions with the Community Council, and after the participation of some Ubuntu team members at the Community Leadership Summit a few months ago, one of the challenges that we identified our community is facing was the lack of a global event to meet face to face after the UDS era. While UbuCons continue to thrive as regional conferences, one of the conclusions we reached was that we needed a way to bring everyone together on a bigger setting to complement the UbuCon fabric: the Summit.

The Summit is the expansion of the traditional UbuCon: more content and at a bigger scale. But at the same maintaining the grass-roots spirit and the community-driven organization that has made these events successful.

Two days and two tracks of content

During these two days, the event will be structured as a traditional conference with presentations, demos and plenaries on the first day and as an unconference for the second one. The idea behind the unconference is simple: participants will propose a set of topics in situ, each one of which will be scheduled as a session. For each session the goal is to have a discussion and reach a set of conclusions and actions to address the topics. Some of you will be familiar with the setting :)

We will also have two tracks to group sessions by theme: Users, for those interested in learning about the non-tech, day-to-day part of using Ubuntu, but also including the component on how to contribute to Ubuntu as an advocate. The Developers track will cover the sessions for the technically minded, including app development, IoT, convergence, cloud and more. One of the exciting things about our community is that there is so much overlap between these themes to make both tracks interesting to everyone.

All in all, the idea is to provide a space to showcase, learn about and discuss the latest Ubuntu technologies, but also to focus on new and vibrant parts of the community and talk about the challenges (and opportunities!) we are facing as a project.

A first-class team

In addition to the support and guidance from the Community Council, the true heroes of the story are Richard Gaskin, Nathan Haines and the Ubuntu California LoCo. Through the years, they have been the engines behind the UbuCon at SCALE in LA, and this time around they were quick again to jump and drive the Summit wagon too.

This wouldn’t have been possible without the SCALE team either: an excellent host to UbuCon in the past and again on this occasion. In particular Gareth Greenaway and Ilan Rabinovitch, who are helping us with the logistics and organization all along the way. If you are joining the Summit, I very much recommend to stay for SCALE as well!

More Summit news coming soon

On the next few weeks we’ll be sharing more details about the Summit, revamping the global UbuCon site and updating the SCALE schedule with all relevant information.

Stay tuned for more, including the session about the UbuCon Summit at the next Ubuntu Online Summit in two weeks.

Looking forward to seeing some known and new faces at the UbuCon Summit in January!

Picture from an original by cm-t arudy

The post Announcing the UbuCon Summit appeared first on David Planella.

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Daniel Holbach

snappyIt’d be a bit of a stretch to call UOS Snappy Online Summit, but Snappy definitely was talk of the town this time around. It was also picked up by tech news sites, who not always depicted Ubuntu’s plans accurately. :-)

Anyway… if you missed some of the sessions, you can always go back, watch the videos of the sessions and check the notes. Here’s the links to the sessions which already happened:

Which leaves us with today, 7th May 2015! You can still join these sessions today – we’ll be glad to hear your input and ideas! :-)

  • 14:00 UTC: Ubuntu Core Brainstorm – Calling all Snappy pioneers
    Snappy and Ubuntu Core are still hot off the press, but it’s already clear that they’re going to bring a lot of opportunities and will make the lives of developers a lot easier. Let’s get together, brainstorm and find out where Snappy can be used in the future, which communities/tools/frameworks can be joined by it, which software should be ported to it and which crazy nice tutorials/demos can be easily put together. Anything goes, join us, no matter if on IRC or in the hangout!
  • 16:00 UTC: Snappy Q&A
    Everything you always wanted to know about Snappy and Ubuntu Core. Bring your questions here! Bring your friends as well. We’ll make sure to have all the relevant experts here.
  • 18:00 UTC: Replace ifupdown with networkd on snappy / cloud / server for 16.04
    What the title says. Networkers, we’ll need you here. :-)

The above are just my suggestions, obviously there’s loads of other good stuff on the schedule today! See you later!

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Michael Hall

Next week we will be kicking off the November 2014 Ubuntu Online Summit where people from the Ubuntu community and Canonical will be hosting live video sessions talking about what is being worked on, what is currently available, and what the future holds across all of the Ubuntu ecosystem.

uos_scheduleWe are in the process of recruiting sessions and filling out the Summit Schedule for this event, which should be finalized at the start of next week. You can register that you are attending on the Summit website, where you can also mark specific sessions that you are interested in and get a personalized view of your schedule (and an available iCal feed too!) UOS is designed for participation, not just consumption. Every session will have active IRC channel that goes along with it where you can speak directly to the people on video. For discussion sessions, you’re encouraged to join the video yourself when you want to join the conversation.

Moreover, we want you to host sessions! Anybody who has an idea for a good topic for conversation, presentation, or planning and is willing to host the video (meaning you need to run a Google On-Air Hangout) can propose a session. You don’t need to be a Canonical employee, project leader, or even an Ubuntu member to run a session, all you need is a topic and a willingness to be the person to drive it. And don’t worry, we have track leads who have volunteered to help you get it setup.

These sessions will be split into tracks, so you can follow along with the topics that interest you. Or you can jump from track to track to see what everybody else in the community is doing. And if you want to host a session yourself, you can contact any one of the friendly Track Leads, who will help you get it registered and on the schedule.

Ubuntu Development

Those who have participated in the Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) in the past will find the same kind of platform-focused topics and discussions in the Ubuntu Development track. This track covers everything from the kernel to packaging, desktops and all of the Ubuntu flavors.

The track leads are: Will CookeŁukasz ZemczakSteve LangasekAntonio Rosales, and Rohan Garg

App & Scope Development

For developers who are targeting the Ubuntu platform, for both apps and Unity scopes, we will be featuring a number of presentations on the current state of the tools, APIs and documentation, as well as gathering feedback from those who have been using them to help us improve upon them in Ubuntu 15.04. You will also see a lot of planning for the Ubuntu Core Apps, and some showcases of other apps or technologies that developers are creating.

The track leads are: Tim PeetersMichael HallAlan Pope, and Nekhelesh Ramananthan

Cloud & DevOps

Going beyond the core and client side, Ubuntu is making a lot of waves in the cloud and server market these days, and there’s no better place to learn about what we’re building (and help us build it) that the Cloud & Devops track. Whether you want to roll out your own OpenStack cloud, or make your web service easy to deploy and scale out, you will find topics here that interest you.

The track leads are: Antonio RosalesMarco CeppiPatricia Gaughen, and José Antonio Rey

Community

The Ubuntu Online Summit is itself a community coordinated event, and we’ve got a track dedicated to helping us improve and grow the whole community. You can use this to showcase the amazing work that your team has been doing, or plan out new events and projects for the coming cycle. The Community Team from canonical will be there, as well as members of the various councils, flavors and boards that provide governance for the Ubuntu project.

The track leads are: David PlanellaDaniel HolbachSvetlana Belkin, and José Antonio Rey

Users

And of course we can’t forget about our millions or users, we have a whole track setup just to provide them with resources and presentations that will help them make the most out Ubuntu. If you have been working on a project for Ubuntu, you should think about hosting a session on this track to show it off. We’ll also be hosting several feedback session to hear directly from users about what works, what doesn’t, and how we can improve.

The track leads are: Nicholas SkaggsElfy, and Scarlett Clark

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Chris Johnston

This week I will be attending Linaro Connect Q1.12 in Redwood City, California. Infact, I’m in an American Airlines plane at 34,000 feet heading there now. In-flight WiFi is awesome!

Over the past two months Michael Hall and myself have been doing a large amount of work on The Summit Scheduler to get it ready for Connect this week including modifying more than 2,400 lines of Summit code. You can find out more about that in my previous post.

I have a few things that I want to get out of Connect. The first is that I want to get feedback on the changes to Summit, as well as figure out what other things we may need to change. The second thing that I want to do is to learn more about the Beagleboard-xM that I have and how to use it for the many different things it can be used for. The third thing that I want to do is to learn about Linaro’s LAVA.

LAVA is an automated validation suite used to run all sorts of different tests on the products that Linaro produces. The things that I would like to get out of Connect in relation to LAVA are how to setup and run LAVA, how to set it up to run tests, and how to produce results and display those results the way that I want them.

If you are at Linaro Connect, and would be willing to talk with me about Summit and the way you use it and your thoughts on the changes, please contact me and we will set aside a time to meet.

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John Bernard

This year’s Ubuntu Hardware Summit (UHS) will take place on December 8th at the Grand Victoria Hotel in Taipei. You can register your place at www.ubuntu.com.uhs

Building on the success of 2010 (with over 200 attendees), the 2011 Ubuntu Hardware Summit promises to deliver more. With keynote speeches from various members of the Canonical team and a more focused technical delivery, UHS is created especially for product managers and engineers at ODMs and OEMs, with interest or responsibility in deploying Ubuntu on new computers and devices.

Highlights will include presentations on Ubuntu Server, deploying Ubuntu Cloud, QA, power management, hardware enablement….and much more! Details of the event can also be found on the new Ubuntu Hardware Debugging website at http://odm.ubuntu.com/portal/

UHS is sponsored by Canonical and free of charge.

To reserve your space, visit www.ubuntu.com/uhs today as registrations will close on 29th November 2011.

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Iain Farrell

We’ve been talking a lot about UDS but some of you out there might not know what it is. Duncan McGregor, one of my colleagues, has had this very conversation with a speaker who will be attending this UDS. He took some time to compose a blog post explaining what the summit is all about.

It’s well worth a read :)

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