Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'slides'

Dustin Kirkland

Earlier this month, I spoke at ContainerDays, part of the excellent DevOpsDays series of conferences -- this one in lovely Portland, Oregon.

I gave a live demo of Kubernetes running directly on bare metal.  I was running it on an 11-node Ubuntu Orange Box -- but I used the exact same tools Canonical's world class consulting team uses to deploy Kubernetes onto racks of physical machines.
You see, the ability to run Kubernetes on bare metal, behind your firewall is essential to the yin-yang duality of Cloud Native computing.  Sometimes, what you need is actually a Native Cloud.
Deploying Kubernetes into virtual machines in the cloud is rather easy, straightforward, with dozens of tools now that can handle that.

But there's only one tool today, that can deploy the exact same Kubernetes to AWS, Azure, GCE, as well as VMware, OpenStack, and bare metal machines.  That tools is conjure-up, which acts as a command line front end to several essential Ubuntu tools: MAAS, LXD, and Juju.

I don't know if the presentation was recorded, but I'm happy to share with you my slides for download, and embedded here below.  There are a few screenshots within that help convey the demo.




Cheers,
Dustin

Read more
Dustin Kirkland

Thank you to Oracle Cloud for inviting me to speak at this month's CloudAustin Meetup hosted by Rackspace.

I very much enjoyed deploying Canonical Kubernetes on Ubuntu in the Oracle Cloud, and then exploring Kubernetes a bit, how it works, the architecture, and a simple workload within.  I'm happy to share my slides below, and you can download a PDF here:


If you're interested in learning more, check out:
It was a great audience, with plenty of good questions, pizza, and networking!

I'm pleased to share my slide deck here.

Cheers,
Dustin

Read more
Dustin Kirkland



Yesterday, I delivered a talk to a lively audience at ContainerWorld in Santa Clara, California.

If I measured "the most interesting slides" by counting "the number of people who took a picture of the slide", then by far "the most interesting slides" are slides 8-11, which pose an answer the question:
"Should I run my PaaS on top of my IaaS, or my IaaS on top of my PaaS"?
In the Ubuntu world, that answer is super easy -- however you like!  At Canonical, we're happy to support:
  1. Kubernetes running on top of Ubuntu OpenStack
  2. OpenStack running on top of Canonical Kubernetes
  3. Kubernetes running along side OpenStack
In all cases, the underlying substrate is perfectly consistent:
  • you've got 1 to N physical or virtual machines
  • which are dynamically provisioned by MAAS or your cloud provider
  • running stable, minimal, secure Ubuntu server image
  • carved up into fast, efficient, independently addressable LXD machine containers
With that as your base, we'll easily to conjure-up a Kubernetes, an OpenStack, or both.  And once you have a Kubernetes or OpenStack, we'll gladly conjure-up one inside the other.


As always, I'm happy to share my slides with you here.  You're welcome to download the PDF, or flip through the embedded slides below.



Cheers,
Dustin

Read more
Dustin Kirkland


From Linux kernel livepatches to encryption to ASLR to compiler optimizations and configuration hardening, we strive to ensure that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is the most secure Linux distribution out of the box.

These slides try to briefly explain:

  • what we do to secure Ubuntu
  • how the underlying technology works
  • when the features took effect in Ubuntu

I hope you find this slide deck informative and useful!  The information herein is largely collected from the Ubuntu Security Features wiki page, where you can always find up to date information.



Cheers,
Dustin

Read more
Dustin Kirkland


On Monday this week, I was afforded the distinct privilege to deliver the opening keynote at the OpenZFS Developer Summit in San Francisco.  It was a beautiful little event, with a full day of informative presentations and lots of networking during lunch and breaks.

Below, you can view my slides, download the PDF, or watch the talk (starts at 31:10) and demo in its entirety.

Hopefully you'll enjoy the demo -- especially the most interesting raw tracing system new in the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Linux 4.4 kernel, something called The Berkeley Packet Filter, or "BPF" for short.  I used a series of open source utilities from Brendan Gregg (from Netflix), called iovisor/bcc.  Quoting the README.md on Github:

BCC is a toolkit for creating efficient kernel tracing and manipulation programs, and includes several useful tools and examples. It makes use of extended BPF (Berkeley Packet Filters), formally known as eBPF, a new feature that was first added to Linux 3.15. Much of what BCC uses requires Linux 4.1 and above.
I'll follow up this post with another one, formally introducing BPF and how to install and use bcc in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, if anyone is interested...




:-Dustin

Read more
Dustin Kirkland


A couple of weeks ago, I delivered a talk at the Container Camp UK 2016.  It was an brilliant event, on a beautiful stage at Picturehouse Central in Picadilly Circus in London.

You're welcome to view the slides or download them as a PDF, or watch my talk below.

And for the techies who want to skip the slide fluff and get their hands dirty, setup your OpenStack and LXD and start streamlining your HPC workloads using this guide.




Enjoy,
:-Dustin

Read more
Dustin Kirkland


Below you can find the audio/video recording of my OpenStack Austin presentation, where I demonstrated Ubuntu OpenStack Mitaka, running on top of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, entirely within LXD machine containers.  You can also download the PDF of the slides here.  And there are a number of other excellent talks here!



Cheers,
Dustin

Read more
Dustin Kirkland



I had the opportunity to speak at Container World 2016 in Santa Clara yesterday.  Thanks in part to the Netflix guys who preceded me, the room was absolutely packed!

You can download a PDF of my slides here, or flip through them embedded below.

I'd really encourage you to try the demo instructions of LXD toward the end!


:-Dustin

Read more
Dustin Kirkland


As always, I enjoyed speaking at the SCALE14x event, especially at the new location in Pasadena, California!

What if you could adapt a package from a newer version of Ubuntu, onto your stable LTS desktop/server?

Or, as a developer, what if you could provide your latest releases to your users running an older LTS version of Ubuntu?

Introducing adapt!

adapt is a lot like apt...  It’s a simple command that installs packages.

But it “adapts” a requested version to run on your current system.

It's a simple command that installs any package from any release of Ubuntu into any version of Ubuntu.

How does adapt work?

Simple… Containers!

More specifically, LXD system containers.

Why containers?

Containers can run anywhere, physical, virtual, desktops, servers, and any CPU architecture.

And containers are light and fast!  Zero latency and no virtualization overhead.

Most importantly, system containers are perfect copies of the released distribution, the operating system itself.

And all of that continuous integration testing we do perform on every single Ubuntu release?

We leverage that!
You can download a PDF of the slides for my talk here, or flip through them here:



I hope you enjoy some of the magic that LXD is making possible ;-)

Cheers!
Dustin

Read more
bmichaelsen

It’s so hard when it doesn’t come easy

It’s so hard when it doesn’t come fast

– So Hard, Taking The Long Way, Dixie Chicks

So, LibreOffice 4.2 is released, FOSDEM is over, was very nice and I am back home in Hamburg after a week in London. I missed the LibreOffice UX Hackfest for that, which I heard was also awesome. So without further ado, here are the slides from my quick talk at FOSDEM:

(direct link if you are watching this on a planet that does not support embedded speakerdecks: https://speakerdeck.com/sweetshark1/liberated-build-system-mission-accomplished)

and some errata for it: On slide 13 it says “the same file is also hardlinked from workdir/” — thats not true for quite a while already. LibreOffice keeps around exactly one copy of a library, unlike the confusing three copies that we had in LibreOffice 3.3. This should be a lot less confusing to the curious first time contributor.

Reviewing all these changes in toto, it became how much we simplified getting involved with LibreOffice through this. As the lyrics quoted above say: “Back when we started, we didn’t know how hard it was”.

If there is just one number to take away from all these slides, its that a noop rebuild for LibreOffice on a three year old developer notebook with the distro provided GNU make 3.81 takes just 17 seconds(*). And slide 7 shows still some possibilities to still speed things up beyond that — and while at current speeds it might not be worth it on Linux, it might be worthwhile for e.g. Windows, which is traditionally rather slow when it comes to file I/O.

On a related note, over time we improved the way new contributors can submit their changes on our instance of gerrit in many ways. Thanks a lot to David, Norbert and Robert for the work on this. One only has to look at one of daily digests generated from activity on gerrit and imagine we would still get one mail for each change, update and merge to the mailing list for manual patch tracking as we did in the early days. Thanks a lot also to Mathias Michel for his work on the script!

So if you haven’t done that yet, consider graping an EasyHack and get started!

A copy of the original .odp is also available at FOSDEM or on the LibreOffice wiki.

(*) This includes checking 1.3GB of generated c++ dependency files for some >8000 object files, which we simplify to <350MB.


Read more