Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'roadmap'

mark

By 14.04 LTS Ubuntu will power tablets, phones, TVs and smart screens from the car to the office kitchen, and it will connect those devices cleanly and seamlessly to the desktop, the server and the cloud.

Unity, the desktop interface in today’s Ubuntu 11.10, was designed with this specific vision in mind. While the interface for each form factor is shaped appropriately, Unity’s core elements are arranged in exactly the way we need to create coherence across all of those devices. This was the origin of the name Unity – a single core interface framework, that scales across all screens, and supports all toolkits.

Canonical and the Ubuntu community have established Ubuntu’s place in desktop, server and cloud deployments. We have also invested in the design and engineering of Unity, motivated by the belief that desktop interfaces would merge with mobile, touch interfaces into a seamless personal computing platform in the future. Today we are inviting the whole Ubuntu community – both commercial and personal – to shape that possibility and design that future; a world where Ubuntu runs on mobile phones, tablets, televisions and traditional PC’s, creating a world where content is instantly available on all devices, in a form that is delightful to use.

A constantly changing world

The way we access the Internet, connect to our friends, listen to music, watch films and go about our daily lives is rapidly evolving. We now use a diverse set of devices with an array of operating systems, which have a range of connectivity. Few people are exclusively loyal to a single technology provider.

Consider this quote from Paul Maritz of VMWare:

“Three years ago over 95 percent of the devices connected to the Internet were personal computers. Three years from now that number will probably be less than 20 percent. More than 80 percent of the devices connected to the Internet will not be Windows-based personal computers.” Paul Maritz, 29 August 2011 VM World Keynote.

Make no mistake – just as the world is changing for manufacturers so is it changing for Linux distributions. Today, 70% of people in Egypt access the Internet solely via the phone. Even in the US that figure is a startling 25%.

Ubuntu is well positioned

Ubuntu will thrive in this new reality.

Our established collaboration with the silicon vendors that are driving this converging market are critical. Intel, ARM and AMD will make the chip-sets that will power this future and Ubuntu works with all of them on all technologies.

Our engagement with the PC market will help bring the results of this work to a huge audience – partnerships with the likes of Dell, HP, Asus, Lenovo, Acer, IBM, Vodafone and more are a gateway to users who want continuous, connected, cross-device computing.

We are determined to bring more free software to more people around the world, and building that future hand in hand with device manufacturers is the best way to do it. There is no winner in place yet. This opportunity remains wide open, but only to products that deliver excellent experiences for users, across a full range of device categories.

The investment we have already made in the interface accommodates the touch scenarios required in some form factors and, with a little love and attention, will work equally well in mouse, keyboard or stylus-driven environments. Ubuntu will not be restricted to small screen or large screen environments but encompasses both and all the form factors in between. We will see our work on the Ubuntu platform land in a variety of formats current and yet to be invented. It is without doubt the most exciting phase in the history of Ubuntu.

Ubuntu One and the software centre

Ubuntu’s personal cloud and app centre services are appropriate for all these environments. They deliver the required storage, syncing and sharing capabilities that are not just a convenience but a requirement as we move to a universe where content is increasingly shared but the devices that access them become more diverse. Ubuntu One’s support for other OSes show the ability of Ubuntu to play nice with others, recognising that the divergence is strength.  It allows users to choose the devices they prefer but still delivering the benefits of Ubuntu-centred strategy.

The next steps

We are describing this at UDS to energize the entire Ubuntu ecosystem around this challenge. Canonical will provide the heavy lifting needed to put us in the ball park, but there are opportunities for participation, contribution and engagement by all elements of the broader Ubuntu community, both corporate and individual.

Our developers, our partners’ developers and the broader open source development community share this opportunity. There is a great deal to discuss, and an array of strands we need to pull together at UDS. But the direction is clear and the prize is great – to bring more free software to more people in more delightful ways than ever before.

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David

Ubuntu Translations Portal

Following the series of blog posts about the Ubuntu Translations plans for the Natty cycle, this week I’m thrilled to report on the Ubuntu Translations Portal, and to announce its initial test deployment.

The idea behind the portal is to aggregate all existing content and to be the main entry point to the translations community for new contributors, providing them answers, inspiration and excitement. For experienced translators it will be a central point for resources and news about translating Ubuntu.

The main goal for this cycle is the deployment of the portal, with an official news feed and planet-like and microblogging feeds, all nicely wrapped in an Ubuntu-Light-based theme. I’m happy to report that we’re doing good progress on this.

So without further ado, here’s a preview of what the portal will look like:

Note that as it stands now, this is very much an alpha deployment on an external site, for development and testing purposes. As such, you’ll see that there is not much content, and that that content has been put there to help with development. You’ll also see that the theme still needs work in several parts of the site, but the current state will already give you a good idea of the shape the portal is taking.

Also note that one of the main requirements is that the site is multilingual, so that everyone can see it in their own language. We’ve been setting up the infrastructure for that, so that next cycle we can start translating the portal in all of the Ubuntu languages, but the first iteration this cycle will probably be in English.

Contribute

Do you want to take part in shaping up the Ubuntu Translations portal?

There are many ways in which you can help. Here are just a few:

Join the Ubuntu Translations Portal discussionDiscuss. Participate in the discussion, ask your questions and stay up to date with the latest developments and announcements in the portal.

Help developing the Ubuntu Translations PortalDevelop. Have you got web development or web design skills? We need you! Help us developing the theme and infrastructure for the portal.

Report a bug in the Ubuntu Translations PortalReport. Have you been using the portal and have noticed any bugs or anything that needs improvement? Report them as bugs in the Ubuntu Translations Portal project in Launchpad.

Write and moderate content for the Ubuntu Translations PortalWrite. Do you want to submit articles related to translation, help with content editing or moderation? Join the Ubuntu Translations Portal editors team and put your writing skills to work.

Stay tuned for more updates. Looking forward to everyone’s participation!

Other posts in this series:


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David

Translations Stories - A tsig mit zibn tsigelekhAs Jono has been mentioning recently, one of the projects we’re working on the translations community this cycle are Translations Stories.

We’d like to show how translations change people’s lives for the best, and how the work of translators has an impact on that. We’d like to share our excitement and highlight the awesome work translators do, and we thought that articles with translations stories would be the perfect vehicle for that.

In order to achieve this, we need your help. You don’t have to be a translator for this: you only need a few spare hours and be willing to give back to the project contributing on this effort to raise awareness on translations.

So, without further ado, here’s how:

Contribute

Do you want to submit a story to let everyone know about the fantastic work the translation team in your language is doing? Well, that’s easy!

  • Sign up. Sign up for writing a translations story on this wiki page by adding your name to the list there.
  • Research. Think about what you want to write, and get some information. The Get inspired section below (or here) should give you a few pointers to get you started.
  • Write a Story. Write a short article highlighting an area of your choice related to translations. Don’t forget to add a picture!
  • Send the Story. Send me your story (david (DOT) planella (AT) ubuntu (DOT) com) adding the word [STORY] to the e-mail’s subject. I’ll then take care of publishing it to Ubuntu News, Ubuntu Planet and to the translators Facebook page.

Get inspired

Here are some ideas about what you can write about:

  • Schools with Ubuntu in your language: Check out the schools using Ubuntu in your language. Get in touch with them to get more information and write how they are using Ubuntu.
  • Translation Jams: Did you run a translation jam during the UbuntuGlobalJam or at any other time? Tell us how it went!
  • Statistics: Did your team had a whooping increase in translation coverage since the last release? Tell us how you dit it and promote some healthy competition among teams.
  • Interviews: Interview and tell us about people being able to use Ubuntu in their language
  • Workflow: Are you particularly proud about your successful translation workflow and would like to show it to other teams? Write an article and let everyone know!
  • Be creative: There are lots more of other subjects or areas where we can highlight the work of translators and their impact on people’s lives. Use your imagination as a source for stories!

Stay tuned for more news on this effort. We’ll soon be publishing some guidelines on how to write good translations stories to help you making them even more awesome.

Are you going to be the first to send one? Looking forward to reading them!

Picture: A tsig mit zibn tsigelekh by Center for Jewish HistoryNo known copyright restrictions


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