Canonical Voices

Posts tagged with 'qa'

pitti

Two weeks ago, PostgreSQL announced the first beta version of the new major 9.1 version, with a lot of anticipated new features like synchronous replication or better support for multilingual databases. Please see the release announcement for details.

Due to my recent moving and the Ubuntu Developer Summit it took me a bit to package them for Debian and Ubuntu, but here they are at last. I uploaded postgresql-9.1 to Debian experimental; currently they are sitting in the NEW queue, but I’m sure our restless Debian archive admins will get to it in a few days. I also provided builds for Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, 10.10. and 11.04 in my PostgreSQL backports for stable Ubuntu releases PPA.

I provided full postgresql-common integration, i. e. you can use all the usual tools like pg_createcluster, pg_upgradecluster etc. to install 9.1 side by side with your 8.4/9.0 instances, attempt an upgrade of your existing instances to 9.1 without endangering the running clusters, etc. Fortunately this time there were no deprecated configuration options, so pg_upgradecluster does not actually have to touch your postgresql.conf for the 9.0 ?9.1 upgrade.

They pass upstream’s and postgresql-common’s integration test suite, so should be reasonably working. But please let me know about everything that doesn’t, so that we can get them in perfect shape in time for the final release.

I anticipate that 9.1 will be the default (and only supported) version in the next Debian release (wheezy), and will most likely be the one shipped in the next Ubuntu LTS (in 12.04). It might be that the next Ubuntu release 11.10 will still ship with 9.0, but that pretty much depends on how many extensions get ported to 9.1 by feature freeze.

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pitti

Apport has provided built-in support for automatically identifying and marking duplicate bug reports for normal signal as well as Python crashes. However, we have more kinds of bug reports submitted through Apport which could benefit from automatic duplication: X.org GPU freezes, package installation failures, kernel oopses, or gcc internal compiler errors, i. e. pretty much everything that gets reported automatically these days.

The latest Apport 1.20 (which also just hit current Ubuntu Natty) now allows package hooks to set a special field DuplicateSignature, which abstracts the concept for other kinds of bug reports where Apport doesn’t do automatic duplication. This field should both uniquely identify the problem class (e. g. “XorgGPUFreeze”) as well as the particular problem, i. e. variables which tell this instance apart from different problems. Aside from these requirements, the value can be any free-form string, Apport only treats it as an opaque value. It doesn’t even need to be ASCII only or only be one line, but for better human inspection I recommend this.

So your report could do something like

   report['DuplicateSignature'] = 'XorgGPUFreeze: instruction %s regs:%s:%s:%s' % (
                     current_instruction, regs[0], regs[1], regs[2])

or

    report['DuplicateSignature'] = 'PackageFailure: ' + log.splitlines()[-1]

This is integrated into Apport’s already existing CrashDatabase class, which maintains a signature ?master bug mapping in a SQLite database. So far these contained the crash signatures (built from executable name, signal number, and the topmost 5 stack trace names). As usual, if an incoming report defines a duplicate signature (from the crash stack trace or from DuplicateSignature), the first one will become the master bug, and all subsequent reports will automatically get closed as a duplicate in Launchpad.

Thanks to Bryce Harrington, who already came up with using this in the latest Intel X.org graphics driver for GPU hangs!

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Thanks to the hard work of Brian Murray we now have a section for Unity on http://status.qa.ubuntu.com

And here it is for the package level:

You’ll notice the “bitesize” section, more on this next week 

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pitti

PostgreSQL 9.0 with a whole lot of new features and improvements is nearing completion. The first release candidate was just announced.

As with the beta versions, I uploaded RC1 to Debian experimental again. If you want to test/use them on Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx), you can get packages from my “PostgreSQL backports for stable Ubuntu releases” PPA. Please let me know if you need them for other releases.

Just for the records, both Debian 6.0 “Squeeze” and Ubuntu 10.10 “Maverick Meerkat” will release and officially support 8.4 only, as 9.0 is too late for the feature freezes of both. Also, it will take quite some time to update all the packaged extensions to 9.0. As usual, 9.0 will be provided as official backports for both Debian and Ubuntu.

Happy testing!

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pitti

The Debian import freeze is settled, the first rush of major changes went into Maverick, and the dust now has settled a bit. Thus it’s time to turn back some attention to crashes and quality in general.

This morning I created maverick chroots for the Apport retracers, and they are currently processing the backlog. I also uploaded a new Apport package which now enables crash reporting by default again.

Happy segfaulting!

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pitti

PostgreSQL did microrelease updates three weeks ago: 8.4.3, 8.3.10, and 8.1.20 are the ones relevant for Debian/Ubuntu. There haven’t been reports about regressions in Debian or the upstream lists so far, so it’s time to push these into stable releases.

The new releases are in Lucid Beta-2, and hardy/jaunty/karmic-proposed. If you are running PostgreSQL, please upgrade to the proposed versions and give feedback to LP #557408.

Updates for Debian Lenny are prepared as well, and await release team ack.

On a related note, I recently fixed quite a major problem in pg_upgradecluster in postgresql-common 106: It did not copy database-level ACLs and configuration settings (Debian #543506). Fixing this required some reenginering of the upgrade process. It’s all thoroughly test case’d, but practical feedback would be very welcome! Remember, if anything goes wrong, the cluster of the previous version is still intact and untouched, so you can run upgrades as many times as you like and only pg_dropcluster the old one when you’re completely satisfied with the upgrade.

Thanks,

Martin

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pitti

Thanks to the work of David Henningsson, we now have a proper Apport symptom for audio bugs. It just got updated again to set default bug titles, which include the card/codec name and the problem, so that Launchpad’s suggested duplicates should work much more reliably.

So from now on you are strongly encouraged to report sound problems with

$ ubuntu-bug audio

instead of trying to guess the package right.

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pitti

The days before Chistmas are a wonderfully quiet time to catch up on old work which otherwise just drowns in the daily noise. I got a lot of Apport cleanups and improvements done.

One particular highlight of 1.11 is that it is now easy and consistent to collect information for a bug report on one place/at one time and save it into a file

$ apport-bug --save /tmp/argh.apport udev

… and report that later on with

$ apport-bug /tmp/argh.apport

This can happen on an entirely different machine.

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pitti

Yesterday PostgreSQL released new security/bug fix microreleases 8.4.2, 8.3.9, and 8.1.19, which fix two security issues and a whole bunch of bugs.

Updates for all supported Ubuntu releases are built in the ubuntu-security-proposed PPA. They pass the upstream and postgresql-common test suites, but more testing is heavily appreciated! Please give feedback in bug LP#496923.

Thanks!

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pitti

So far, Apport package hooks were limited to collecting data from the local system. However, a lot of debugging recipes and standard bug triage ping pong involves asking the reporter further questions which need reponses from a human. This can range from a very simple information message box “Now, please plug in the camera which is not detected” until a complex decision tree based on the symptoms the user sees.

As discussed at UDS Barcelona, Apport will grow this functionality in Karmic. A first preview is available in my PPA. The GUI looks horrible, but the API for hooks won’t change any more, so you can now begin to develop your interactive hooks.

Example:

import apport.hookutils

def add_info(report, ui):
    apport.hookutils.attach_alsa(report)

    ui.information('Now playing test sound...')

    report['AplayOut'] = apport.hookutils.command_output(['aplay',
            '/usr/share/sounds/question.wav'])

    response = ui.yesno('Did you hear the sound?')
    if response == None: # user cancelled
        raise StopIteration
    report['SoundAudible'] = str(response)

Please see the package-hooks.txt documentation for details.

I implemented all currently existing UI functions (information, yes/no question, file selector, multiple choice dialog) for GTK and CLI, and all except the multiple choice dialog for Qt. Anyone willing to hack on an implementation of ui_question_choice() similar to what the GTK frontend is doing?

Update:I merged Richard Johnson’s branch (thanks!) and uploaded a new package into my PPA. apport-qt is now fully functional.

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